Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framedpicture to keep it STRAIGHT?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Al Schmidt, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. Al Schmidt

    Al Schmidt Guest

    Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    keep it STRAIGHT?

    I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.

    The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    perfectly parallel.

    I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came with
    it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).

    So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    photo by hand.
    Al Schmidt, Feb 27, 2013
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Al Schmidt

    Rob Guest

    On 28/02/2013 8:06 AM, Al Schmidt wrote:
    > Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    > keep it STRAIGHT?
    >
    > I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    > picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    > wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.
    >
    > The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    > perfectly parallel.
    >
    > I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came with
    > it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).
    >
    > So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    > with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    > clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    > photo by hand.
    >



    The camera film plane should be parallel to the picture.

    Small stuff use a copy stand or tripod.

    Large stuff on a wall use a tripod.

    Set up by using a bubble level on the camera in the flash shoe, a tape
    measure or a mirror.

    Not sure if the D5000 has a grid in the viewfinder but switch it on.
    Rob, Feb 27, 2013
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On 2/27/2013 5:09 PM, Rob wrote:
    > On 28/02/2013 8:06 AM, Al Schmidt wrote:
    >> Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    >> keep it STRAIGHT?
    >>
    >> I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    >> picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    >> wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.
    >>
    >> The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    >> perfectly parallel.
    >>
    >> I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came with
    >> it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).
    >>
    >> So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    >> with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    >> clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    >> photo by hand.
    >>

    >
    >
    > The camera film plane should be parallel to the picture.
    >
    > Small stuff use a copy stand or tripod.
    >
    > Large stuff on a wall use a tripod.
    >
    > Set up by using a bubble level on the camera in the flash shoe, a tape
    > measure or a mirror.
    >
    > Not sure if the D5000 has a grid in the viewfinder but switch it on.



    It's called Photoshop or Photoshop Elements.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
    James Silverton, Feb 27, 2013
    #3
  4. Al Schmidt

    Martin Brown Guest

    On 27/02/2013 21:06, Al Schmidt wrote:
    > Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    > keep it STRAIGHT?


    I think you actually mean square. You are shooting from too close and at
    extreme wide angle if the straight lines are curved.

    > I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    > picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    > wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.
    >
    > The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    > perfectly parallel.


    They would be apart from barrel/pincushion distortion if you actually
    took the photograph from exactly on centreline of the picture.
    >
    > I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came with
    > it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).
    >
    > So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    > with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    > clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    > photo by hand.


    However, you can usually get better quality results by deliberately
    photographing off axis so that any reflection from the glass is onto a
    black velvet cloth and then straighten the image out with perspective
    correction in post processing.

    Taking a shot square on towards a varnished or glass covered picture
    invariably leaves a reflection of the camera and photographer faintly
    visible unless you have total control of the lighting.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown
    Martin Brown, Feb 27, 2013
    #4
  5. Al Schmidt

    Rob Guest

    On 28/02/2013 9:40 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    > On 2/27/2013 5:09 PM, Rob wrote:
    >> On 28/02/2013 8:06 AM, Al Schmidt wrote:
    >>> Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    >>> keep it STRAIGHT?
    >>>
    >>> I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    >>> picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    >>> wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.
    >>>
    >>> The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    >>> perfectly parallel.
    >>>
    >>> I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came
    >>> with
    >>> it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).
    >>>
    >>> So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    >>> with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    >>> clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    >>> photo by hand.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> The camera film plane should be parallel to the picture.
    >>
    >> Small stuff use a copy stand or tripod.
    >>
    >> Large stuff on a wall use a tripod.
    >>
    >> Set up by using a bubble level on the camera in the flash shoe, a tape
    >> measure or a mirror.
    >>
    >> Not sure if the D5000 has a grid in the viewfinder but switch it on.

    >
    >
    > It's called Photoshop or Photoshop Elements.
    >

    Still better to have a good image first before resorting to PS
    Rob, Feb 28, 2013
    #5
  6. On 2/27/2013 8:16 PM, Rob wrote:
    > On 28/02/2013 9:40 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    >> On 2/27/2013 5:09 PM, Rob wrote:
    >>> On 28/02/2013 8:06 AM, Al Schmidt wrote:
    >>>> Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    >>>> keep it STRAIGHT?
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    >>>> picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    >>>> wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.
    >>>>
    >>>> The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    >>>> perfectly parallel.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came
    >>>> with
    >>>> it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).
    >>>>
    >>>> So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    >>>> with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture
    >>>> frame is
    >>>> clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    >>>> photo by hand.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> The camera film plane should be parallel to the picture.
    >>>
    >>> Small stuff use a copy stand or tripod.
    >>>
    >>> Large stuff on a wall use a tripod.
    >>>
    >>> Set up by using a bubble level on the camera in the flash shoe, a tape
    >>> measure or a mirror.
    >>>
    >>> Not sure if the D5000 has a grid in the viewfinder but switch it on.

    >>
    >>
    >> It's called Photoshop or Photoshop Elements.
    >>

    > Still better to have a good image first before resorting to PS


    Why? Can you really tell that an image has been rotated 5 or 6 degrees?
    I'm sure I could hold a camera horizontal within those limits.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
    James Silverton, Feb 28, 2013
    #6
  7. Al Schmidt

    David Taylor Guest

    On 27/02/2013 21:06, Al Schmidt wrote:
    > Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    > keep it STRAIGHT?
    >
    > I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    > picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    > wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.
    >
    > The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    > perfectly parallel.
    >
    > I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came with
    > it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).
    >
    > So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    > with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    > clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    > photo by hand.


    I have the same problem as sometimes my photos have to be taken rapidly,
    so I use the pincushion or barrel-distortion correction functions in my
    Paint Shop Pro software to make the edges straight, and then the
    perspective correction function to rotate the final image and make it
    rectangular.

    As it happens, I also use a Nikon D5000 DSLR.
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Feb 28, 2013
    #7
  8. Al Schmidt

    Rob Guest

    Rob, Feb 28, 2013
    #8
  9. Al Schmidt

    Rob Guest

    On 28/02/2013 7:50 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > This painting, shot on the same day, had some "Keystone" vertical
    > distortion in the original which was fixed in CS5, also no glass in the
    > frame, and no reflection problem present.
    > < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/DSC_0548-1w.jpg >



    Having taken images of works in an art gallery with a tripod etc I have
    used the available gallery lights only. Its very unusual that the
    gallery staff will illuminate paintings or art so that its shows
    reflections or unwanted shadows, for that matter, to the viewer.
    Rob, Feb 28, 2013
    #9
  10. Al Schmidt

    otter Guest

    On Feb 27, 3:06 pm, Al Schmidt <> wrote:
    > Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    > keep it STRAIGHT?
    >
    > I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    > picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    > wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.
    >
    > The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    > perfectly parallel.
    >
    > I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came with
    > it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).
    >
    > So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    > with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    > clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    > photo by hand.


    On the other hand, what is the point of taking such pictures, anyway?

    Can someone show a picture of a painting that they are actually proud
    of?
    otter, Feb 28, 2013
    #10
  11. On 2/28/2013 1:06 PM, Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
    > Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >> On 2013-02-28 01:50:31 -0800, (Floyd L. Davidson) said:
    >>
    >>> Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>>> On 2013-02-28 00:11:55 -0800, (Floyd L. Davidson) said:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>>>>> On 2013-02-27 22:21:45 -0800, (Floyd L. Davidson) said:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On 2013-02-27 21:18:13 -0800, isw <> said:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> In article <kglsgj$1hi$>,
    >>>>>>>>> Al Schmidt <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    >>>>>>>>>> keep it STRAIGHT?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Yes. It's called GIMP.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Isaac
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Nope!
    >>>>>>>> GIMP is not a technique for shooting handheld shots of
    >>>>>>>> framed pictures. It is just one of the possible post
    >>>>>>>> processing tools for fixing poor technique.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> If you shoot framed pictures, with or without a tripod,
    >>>>>>> and do not have absolute control of the lighting then
    >>>>>>> the best technique is to frame for the fewest
    >>>>>>> reflections and post process to remove resulting
    >>>>>>> perspective distortion.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> It's done that way because reflections are easy enough
    >>>>>>> to avoid and very difficult to remove with post
    >>>>>>> processing, while perspective distortion is somewhat
    >>>>>>> difficult to totally avoid but easy to remove with post
    >>>>>>> processing.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Which is to say that Isaac pretty much got it right!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> While it is true that reflections can be problematic,
    >>>>>> you are making the assumption that glass is a problem
    >>>>>> you will be faced with all framed, or mounted
    >>>>>> pictures. The OP seemed to be concerned with finding, or
    >>>>>> being instructed in a technique to reduce perspective
    >>>>>> distortion when shooting framed and mounted pictures
    >>>>>> handheld. There was no mention of reflections or glass.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> He didn't mention a lot of things, but reflections are
    >>>>> a fact of life when it comes to shooting mounted pictures.
    >>>>
    >>>> Only if the framed picture is protected with glass. Not
    >>>> all framed pictures are photographs protected by glass.
    >>>
    >>> Oh? I don't think that is true...
    >>>
    >>>>>> While I agree that GIMP, Photoshop, Lightroom, and a few
    >>>>>> other editing products have it within their capability
    >>>>>> to fix much of the distortion issues in post, none of
    >>>>>> them could even be flippantly described as an actual
    >>>>>> "Technique" for capturing such images. The are post
    >>>>>> processing tools, not photographic techniques. So, as
    >>>>>> such Isaac was wrong.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> He isn't as far off the mark as you are!
    >>>>
    >>>> Not quite, since there has been no mention of glass, or
    >>>> reflections.
    >>>
    >>> The OP is very inexperienced. He didn't even understand
    >>> what was causing the distortion he is seeing. He also
    >>> doesn't understand the effects of correcting it in
    >>> different ways.

    >>
    >> Perhaps, perhaps not.
    >>
    >>> His next question was going to be, "Okay, I'm getting
    >>> nearly parallel lines now, but what do I do about
    >>> getting rid of the flare that shows up on ever shinny
    >>> part of the painting???"

    >>
    >> Now you are making an assumption regarding something
    >> that was never written, to justify your position. You
    >> are making a statement regarding the OP's thought
    >> process, and neither one of us is privy to that.
    >> Unless you are capable of some unique clairvoyant mind reading act.

    >
    > It's not clairvoyant at all, it's just experience. It
    > also is not something just to justify a position, rather what
    > I explained to you was the specfic thought process a the
    > time that I wrote the first response.
    >
    > The rest of you article was utter drivel that should embarass
    > you...
    >

    I saw an exhibition of nature photography recently in San Francisco and
    I was surprised how large color print paper could be. I'm also amazed
    that development of such paper can be done. However, I suspect many
    paintings are larger than that size.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
    James Silverton, Feb 28, 2013
    #11
  12. Al Schmidt

    Rob Guest

    On 1/03/2013 1:09 AM, otter wrote:
    >> So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    >> >with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    >> >clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    >> >photo by hand.

    > On the other hand, what is the point of taking such pictures, anyway?
    >
    > Can someone show a picture of a painting that they are actually proud
    > of?



    If a job, which should be done correctly, with understanding, to
    eliminate problems, one should develop technique, to accomplish a good
    result.

    I only use happy snaps as a reference and it does not matter what they
    look like (within reason), but still follow the same basic steps. Its
    not likely I would ever hang them or reproduce them.
    Rob, Feb 28, 2013
    #12
  13. Al Schmidt

    RichA Guest

    On Feb 27, 4:06 pm, Al Schmidt <> wrote:
    > Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    > keep it STRAIGHT?


    Gridline overlay in the viewfinder. Make sure your lens is level with
    the centre of the picture.
    RichA, Mar 1, 2013
    #13
  14. Al Schmidt

    nick c Guest

    On 2/27/2013 1:06 PM, Al Schmidt wrote:
    > Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    > keep it STRAIGHT?
    >
    > I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    > picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    > wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.
    >
    > The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    > perfectly parallel.
    >
    > I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came with
    > it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).



    >
    > So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    > with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    > clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    > photo by hand.
    >


    I'll stretch my imagination and offer the following explanation, and
    then some advice.

    Lenses inherently have some degree of distortion, some more than others.
    However, I noticed flat field macro lenses are designed to provide high
    sharpness with a minimum amount of field distortion at close distances.
    Lens designers know that optical aberrations increase as the lens moves
    further away from the film plane, or as in this case, from the sensor.
    That's where floating element(s) designs comes into play. So, as I see
    the issue, unless the lens is designed to capture an image in a flat
    field plane, field curvature and spherical aberrations are problems the
    photographer has to be aware of when trying to capture a flat field
    image. Although there may well be other initial image set-up
    considerations that must be dealt with, the final answer to your inquiry
    may lay with the design of the lens itself.

    When using a common lens, a lens not designed to capture a close flat
    field image, the way I deal with such described aberrations is to
    capture more of the image and crop the distortion from the image. Of
    course the problem may be slightly compounded if the photographer
    intends to have the entire frame in the picture too. Then I suggest you
    step into a telephone booth and change into your Photoshop costume and
    SHAZAM, use Photoshop skills to make whatever necessary image distortion
    corrections. However, be initially aware that when taking a picture,
    cropping will be necessary so adjust the set-up to allow for distortion
    correction and cropping.

    That's my story, Al, and I'm sticking to it. Now if I can find my pipe
    I'll relax and see what's on the tube.
    nick c, Mar 1, 2013
    #14
  15. Al Schmidt

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Wednesday, February 27, 2013 9:06:27 PM UTC, Al Schmidt wrote:
    > Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    >
    > keep it STRAIGHT?
    >
    >
    >
    > I'm sure there are special cameras,


    Have you tried this method ;-)

    Dynamo' s Magic photos with hands.mov
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfsnfRrnAE8
    Whisky-dave, Mar 1, 2013
    #15
  16. Al Schmidt

    nick c Guest

    On 2/27/2013 1:06 PM, Al Schmidt wrote:
    > Is there a TECHNIQUE to snapping a photo by hand of a framed picture to
    > keep it STRAIGHT?
    >
    > I'm sure there are special cameras, but I often snap (sans tripod) a
    > picture of a painting placed on the ground or of a framed photo on the
    > wall, and EVERY SINGLE TIME the photo comes out needing straightening.
    >
    > The funny part about the straightening is that the sides are never
    > perfectly parallel.
    >
    > I'm using a Costco Nikon D5000 with the standard zoom lens that came with
    > it (as it's the only lens I have other than the larger zoom lens).
    >
    > So, I guess my question is WHY does EVERY one of these pictures end up
    > with sides that are not parallel to each other when the picture frame is
    > clearly parallel and I'm only about 3 or 4 feet from it when I snap the
    > photo by hand.
    >


    It took a while for me to find a particular picture that illustrates
    what I was attempting to tell you in a previous post, in this thread.
    This unsigned painting was hanging on a wall, behind glass, in a wood
    frame. My wife liked the painting so I took a hand held picture and
    enlarged it for her. The distortion was corrected, along with a minimum
    of cropping, using Photoshop. The initial hand-held setup was aligned
    with the painting but I don't remember the lens I used or which camera I
    used. Damn, I don't even remember whose wall the painting was hanging
    on. For the record, it's my photo but not my painting.

    https://dl-web.dropbox.com/get/Phot...ACPRuiUChoybMt9v38hteHn8EgYLrMtPnhudbgFhmm9_g
    nick c, Mar 1, 2013
    #16
  17. Al Schmidt

    Al Schmidt Guest

    James Silverton wrote on Wed, 27 Feb 2013 20:39:16 -0500:

    > Why? Can you really tell that an image has been rotated 5 or 6 degrees?
    > I'm sure I could hold a camera horizontal within those limits.


    All you guys are saying I'm not holding it level or horizontal.

    Maybe that's it - but I can easily align the top of the viewfinder
    with that of the frame - and it STILL comes out crooked.

    And, as suggested, I can easily align ONE of the sides using
    any number of freeware choices, e.g., The Gimp as shown below:
    http://graphicssoft.about.com/od/gimp/ss/rotatestraight.htm

    But often, the two supposedly parallel sides are NOT parallel, so, it's
    impossible to straighten without cropping.

    Why would two parallel sides not be parallel in the photo?
    Al Schmidt, Mar 2, 2013
    #17
  18. Al Schmidt

    Al Schmidt Guest

    Martin Brown wrote on Wed, 27 Feb 2013 22:48:36 +0000:

    > They would be apart from barrel/pincushion distortion if you actually
    > took the photograph from exactly on centreline of the picture.


    Ah, do I need to have the lens aimed dead center on the centerline?

    I had not thought of that as I thought I only needed to be parallel
    to the painting, as a whole.
    Al Schmidt, Mar 2, 2013
    #18
  19. Al Schmidt

    David Taylor Guest

    On 02/03/2013 18:40, Al Schmidt wrote:
    []
    > All you guys are saying I'm not holding it level or horizontal.
    >
    > Maybe that's it - but I can easily align the top of the viewfinder
    > with that of the frame - and it STILL comes out crooked.
    >
    > And, as suggested, I can easily align ONE of the sides using
    > any number of freeware choices, e.g., The Gimp as shown below:
    > http://graphicssoft.about.com/od/gimp/ss/rotatestraight.htm
    >
    > But often, the two supposedly parallel sides are NOT parallel, so, it's
    > impossible to straighten without cropping.
    >
    > Why would two parallel sides not be parallel in the photo?


    You may be assuming that in your camera the framing in the viewfinder
    exactly matches the view of the sensor. It may not - there may be a
    slight twist between them (except in the most expensive professional
    level cameras). The lens itself may introduce pincushion or barrel
    distortion, leading to sides that are not even straight.

    Given all this, not to mention the issue of reflections in glass-covered
    pictures, perhaps you might accept that post-processing is the easiest
    way to get things right.
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Mar 2, 2013
    #19
  20. On 3/2/2013 2:06 PM, David Taylor wrote:
    > On 02/03/2013 18:40, Al Schmidt wrote:
    > []
    >> All you guys are saying I'm not holding it level or horizontal.
    >>
    >> Maybe that's it - but I can easily align the top of the viewfinder
    >> with that of the frame - and it STILL comes out crooked.
    >>
    >> And, as suggested, I can easily align ONE of the sides using
    >> any number of freeware choices, e.g., The Gimp as shown below:
    >> http://graphicssoft.about.com/od/gimp/ss/rotatestraight.htm
    >>
    >> But often, the two supposedly parallel sides are NOT parallel, so, it's
    >> impossible to straighten without cropping.
    >>
    >> Why would two parallel sides not be parallel in the photo?

    >
    > You may be assuming that in your camera the framing in the viewfinder
    > exactly matches the view of the sensor. It may not - there may be a
    > slight twist between them (except in the most expensive professional
    > level cameras). The lens itself may introduce pincushion or barrel
    > distortion, leading to sides that are not even straight.
    >
    > Given all this, not to mention the issue of reflections in glass-covered
    > pictures, perhaps you might accept that post-processing is the easiest
    > way to get things right.


    This is not an attempt at sarcasm but I am puzzled as to what can do
    about reflections in post precessing. I know I might use a polarizer
    when taking the picture.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
    James Silverton, Mar 2, 2013
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Moody Marco
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    2,297
  2. pgiblin

    Advise on Photo software and Technique

    pgiblin, Jul 28, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    283
    Joseph Meehan
    Jul 29, 2003
  3. xianzeguanggao

    Seek cooperation Expect hand in hand

    xianzeguanggao, Jun 14, 2007, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    505
    xianzeguanggao
    Jun 14, 2007
  4. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Microsoft Left Hand, Meet Microsoft Right Hand

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Mar 5, 2011, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    364
    Gordon
    Mar 7, 2011
  5. Pablo

    I love to go snapping with this Samyang

    Pablo, Jun 2, 2012, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    258
    Bruce
    Jun 6, 2012
Loading...

Share This Page