Is the world becoming dumber?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Margolotta, Apr 19, 2006.

  1. Margolotta

    Margolotta Guest

    I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went to pick up a box
    of cornflakes. Next to said box was a packet of Kellogg's Crunchy NUT
    Cornflakes. On the side was the following allergy advice: -

    "This product contains nuts."

    And I was thinking - I damned well hope it does, or I'd be asking for my
    money back!

    Thinking this was a one off and that Kellogg's believed that particularly
    stupid people bought their products, I headed on over to the dairy section.
    Picking up a pint (sorry, 500ml) of Dairy Crest semi-skimmed, I noticed the
    following on the front of the carton. Yep, you guessed it: 'This product
    contains milk.' Well, DUH! If it didn't, the carton would be empty...

    And it was the same on 100s of other products; I saw sliced loaves bearing an
    announcement warning the consumer that they contained wheat, cartons of
    yoghurt with warnings that they contained milk and jars of peanut butter
    stating that it should not be consumed if one is allergic to peanuts!

    Okay, I realise companies have to cover themselves these days but, surely, if
    a nut-allergy sufferer is moronic enough to eat crunchy nut cornflakes, then
    they really deserve everything they get.

    Are companies *REALLY* so paranoid about being sued they have to put warnings
    on the most obvious of products?!
     
    Margolotta, Apr 19, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Margolotta

    Ghostrider Guest

    Margolotta wrote:
    > I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went to pick up a box
    > of cornflakes. Next to said box was a packet of Kellogg's Crunchy NUT
    > Cornflakes. On the side was the following allergy advice: -
    >
    > "This product contains nuts."
    >
    > And I was thinking - I damned well hope it does, or I'd be asking for my
    > money back!
    >
    > Thinking this was a one off and that Kellogg's believed that particularly
    > stupid people bought their products, I headed on over to the dairy section.
    > Picking up a pint (sorry, 500ml) of Dairy Crest semi-skimmed, I noticed the
    > following on the front of the carton. Yep, you guessed it: 'This product
    > contains milk.' Well, DUH! If it didn't, the carton would be empty...
    >
    > And it was the same on 100s of other products; I saw sliced loaves bearing an
    > announcement warning the consumer that they contained wheat, cartons of
    > yoghurt with warnings that they contained milk and jars of peanut butter
    > stating that it should not be consumed if one is allergic to peanuts!
    >
    > Okay, I realise companies have to cover themselves these days but, surely, if
    > a nut-allergy sufferer is moronic enough to eat crunchy nut cornflakes, then
    > they really deserve everything they get.
    >
    > Are companies *REALLY* so paranoid about being sued they have to put warnings
    > on the most obvious of products?!
    >


    Advisory labeling is protection from lawyers who file suits
    and not of people who know their allergies and limitations.
    And one can blame the legislators who, since most are lawyers,
    write the inane rules and regulations that put the warning
    labels on product packaging...not to limit the number of suits
    but to placate their local electorates.
     
    Ghostrider, Apr 19, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Margolotta wrote:

    > I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went to pick up a
    > box of cornflakes. Next to said box was a packet of Kellogg's Crunchy NUT
    > Cornflakes. On the side was the following allergy advice: -
    >
    > "This product contains nuts."


    Lawyer thing.

    > And I was thinking - I damned well hope it does, or I'd be asking for my
    > money back!


    There are no nuts in Grape Nuts.


    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    Coming Soon: Filtering rules specific to various real news clients
     
    Blinky the Shark, Apr 19, 2006
    #3
  4. Margolotta

    clot Guest

    Ghostrider wrote:
    > Margolotta wrote:
    >> I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went to pick
    >> up a box of cornflakes. Next to said box was a packet of Kellogg's
    >> Crunchy NUT Cornflakes. On the side was the following allergy
    >> advice: - "This product contains nuts."
    >>
    >> And I was thinking - I damned well hope it does, or I'd be asking
    >> for my money back!
    >>
    >> Thinking this was a one off and that Kellogg's believed that
    >> particularly stupid people bought their products, I headed on over
    >> to the dairy section. Picking up a pint (sorry, 500ml) of Dairy
    >> Crest semi-skimmed, I noticed the following on the front of the
    >> carton. Yep, you guessed it: 'This product contains milk.' Well,
    >> DUH! If it didn't, the carton would be empty... And it was the same
    >> on 100s of other products; I saw sliced loaves
    >> bearing an announcement warning the consumer that they contained
    >> wheat, cartons of yoghurt with warnings that they contained milk and
    >> jars of peanut butter stating that it should not be consumed if one
    >> is allergic to peanuts! Okay, I realise companies have to cover
    >> themselves these days but,
    >> surely, if a nut-allergy sufferer is moronic enough to eat crunchy
    >> nut cornflakes, then they really deserve everything they get.
    >>
    >> Are companies *REALLY* so paranoid about being sued they have to put
    >> warnings on the most obvious of products?!
    >>

    >
    > Advisory labeling is protection from lawyers who file suits
    > and not of people who know their allergies and limitations.
    > And one can blame the legislators who, since most are lawyers,
    > write the inane rules and regulations that put the warning
    > labels on product packaging...not to limit the number of suits
    > but to placate their local electorates.


    I'm with you on this. Let's reflect upon the Nanny State that Tony and
    Gordon have enabled. "Blow the dangerous drivers, let's gain an income
    from those that inadvertently exceed the limit whilst watching the road
    for potential dangers!"
     
    clot, Apr 19, 2006
    #4
  5. Margolotta

    Beck Guest

    Margolotta wrote:
    > I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went to pick up
    > a box of cornflakes. Next to said box was a packet of Kellogg's
    > Crunchy NUT Cornflakes. On the side was the following allergy advice:
    > -
    >
    > "This product contains nuts."
    >
    > And I was thinking - I damned well hope it does, or I'd be asking for
    > my money back!
    >
    > Thinking this was a one off and that Kellogg's believed that
    > particularly stupid people bought their products, I headed on over to
    > the dairy section. Picking up a pint (sorry, 500ml) of Dairy Crest
    > semi-skimmed, I noticed the following on the front of the carton.
    > Yep, you guessed it: 'This product contains milk.' Well, DUH! If it
    > didn't, the carton would be empty...
    >
    > And it was the same on 100s of other products; I saw sliced loaves
    > bearing an announcement warning the consumer that they contained
    > wheat, cartons of yoghurt with warnings that they contained milk and
    > jars of peanut butter stating that it should not be consumed if one
    > is allergic to peanuts!
    >
    > Okay, I realise companies have to cover themselves these days but,
    > surely, if a nut-allergy sufferer is moronic enough to eat crunchy
    > nut cornflakes, then they really deserve everything they get.
    >
    > Are companies *REALLY* so paranoid about being sued they have to put
    > warnings on the most obvious of products?!


    The funniest time I saw that warning was actually on a packet of peanuts.
    The mind boggles. Trouble is this paranoia makes it very difficult for
    people with nut allergies to make selections with their food. It gets to a
    point where there is a warning on non-nut products and those people are
    restricted in what they can eat.
     
    Beck, Apr 19, 2006
    #5
  6. Margolotta

    Beck Guest

    Ghostrider wrote:
    > Advisory labeling is protection from lawyers who file suits
    > and not of people who know their allergies and limitations.
    > And one can blame the legislators who, since most are lawyers,
    > write the inane rules and regulations that put the warning
    > labels on product packaging...not to limit the number of suits
    > but to placate their local electorates.


    Nut warnings are not a requirement by law even if the product does contain
    nuts. Its down to the companies who are over-protecting themselves.
     
    Beck, Apr 19, 2006
    #6
  7. Margolotta

    Beck Guest

    Beck wrote:
    > Ghostrider wrote:
    >> Advisory labeling is protection from lawyers who file suits
    >> and not of people who know their allergies and limitations.
    >> And one can blame the legislators who, since most are lawyers,
    >> write the inane rules and regulations that put the warning
    >> labels on product packaging...not to limit the number of suits
    >> but to placate their local electorates.

    >
    > Nut warnings are not a requirement by law even if the product does
    > contain nuts. Its down to the companies who are over-protecting
    > themselves.


    That should have said "UK Law"
     
    Beck, Apr 19, 2006
    #7
  8. Margolotta

    thanatoid Guest

    "Beck" <> wrote in
    news:4446bd04$0$23181$:

    > Margolotta wrote:
    >> I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went
    >> to pick up a box of cornflakes. Next to said box was a
    >> packet of Kellogg's Crunchy NUT Cornflakes. On the side
    >> was the following allergy advice: -
    >>
    >> "This product contains nuts."
    >>
    >> And I was thinking - I damned well hope it does, or I'd be
    >> asking for my money back!
    >>
    >> Thinking this was a one off and that Kellogg's believed
    >> that particularly stupid people bought their products, I
    >> headed on over to the dairy section. Picking up a pint
    >> (sorry, 500ml) of Dairy Crest semi-skimmed, I noticed the
    >> following on the front of the carton. Yep, you guessed it:
    >> 'This product contains milk.' Well, DUH! If it didn't, the
    >> carton would be empty...
    >>
    >> And it was the same on 100s of other products; I saw
    >> sliced loaves bearing an announcement warning the consumer
    >> that they contained wheat, cartons of yoghurt with
    >> warnings that they contained milk and jars of peanut
    >> butter stating that it should not be consumed if one is
    >> allergic to peanuts!
    >>
    >> Okay, I realise companies have to cover themselves these
    >> days but, surely, if a nut-allergy sufferer is moronic
    >> enough to eat crunchy nut cornflakes, then they really
    >> deserve everything they get.
    >>
    >> Are companies *REALLY* so paranoid about being sued they
    >> have to put warnings on the most obvious of products?!

    >
    > The funniest time I saw that warning was actually on a
    > packet of peanuts. The mind boggles. Trouble is this
    > paranoia makes it very difficult for people with nut
    > allergies to make selections with their food. It gets to a
    > point where there is a warning on non-nut products and
    > those people are restricted in what they can eat.


    That's because many "non-nut" (or other allergen) containing
    products are often manufactured in facilities that ALSO process
    the allergens. A TRACE amount may be enough to kill a severely
    allergic person.

    (Apparently, cockroach parts and rat shit, also found in trace
    amounts in almost everything we eat, is not enough to kill
    anyone.)

    Some companies spell it out ("this product was manufactured in a
    facility that processes X and may contain traces of same"), some
    just say "may contain X". I don't have a problem with it,
    frankly.

    What's funny is no one has yet apparently realized that
    antifreeze (yes, the same one you put in your car) is regularly
    added to many semi-liquid and liquid foods as a free-flow (I
    think, or blending) agent. It is called polyethylene glycol.
    Check it out in the supermarket if you don't believe me. Vanilla
    flavoring (artificial, needless to say) is one of the MANY
    products almost all manufacturers put antifreeze into.

    Still, do not underestimate stupidity.

    Jessica Simpson (if you don't know who she is, you're just
    lucky) thought tuna is actually chicken, and said it on
    international TV.

    I hate to overuse a quote, but:

    "Only two things are infinite, the universe and
    human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

    - Albert Einstein

    --
    thanatoid-Tip® #1
    It's OK to talk with your mouth full as long as stuff doesn't
    fall out.
     
    thanatoid, Apr 20, 2006
    #8
  9. Margolotta

    Beck Guest

    thanatoid wrote:

    > What's funny is no one has yet apparently realized that
    > antifreeze (yes, the same one you put in your car) is regularly
    > added to many semi-liquid and liquid foods as a free-flow (I
    > think, or blending) agent. It is called polyethylene glycol.
    > Check it out in the supermarket if you don't believe me. Vanilla
    > flavoring (artificial, needless to say) is one of the MANY
    > products almost all manufacturers put antifreeze into.


    Vanilla eh? Wondered what brainless twat thought of that one.
     
    Beck, Apr 20, 2006
    #9
  10. Margolotta

    philo Guest

    Margolotta wrote:
    > I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went to pick up a box
    > of cornflakes. Next to said box was a packet of Kellogg's Crunchy NUT
    > Cornflakes. On the side was the following allergy advice: -
    >
    > "This product contains nuts."
    >
    > And I was thinking - I damned well hope it does, or I'd be asking for my
    > money back!
    >


    <snip>

    on a bottle of sleeping pills...the warning is:

    may cause drowsiness.
     
    philo, Apr 20, 2006
    #10
  11. Margolotta

    thanatoid Guest

    Mara <> wrote in
    news::

    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?O30345CFC


    Thanks for the links. I THOUGHT I got the name wrong (not
    getting any younger, but MUCH dumber), the stuff in food is
    propylene glycol.

    Propylene glycol (C3H8O2; CAS no. 57-55-6), also known as 1,2-
    propanediol, is a chemical compound (a diol alcohol), usually a
    tasteless, odorless, and colorless clear oily liquid that is
    hygroscopic and miscible with water. Its molar mass is 74 g/mol.

    Propylene glycol is used:

    ==> as a moisturizer to maintain moisture in medicines,
    cosmetics, food, and tobacco products,
    As a flavoring agent in Angostura and Orange bitters
    ==> As a solvent for food colors and flavourings
    As a humectant food additive, labeled as E number E1520
    As a carrier in fragrance oils
    As a food grade antifreeze
    In smoke machines to make artificial smoke for use in
    firefighters' training and theatrical productions
    In hand sanitizers, antibacterial lotions, and saline solutions
    As a main ingredient in many cosmetic products, including baby
    wipes, bubble baths, and shampoos
    As the primary ingredient in the "Paint" inside a Paintball
    ==> As a base ingredient in aircraft deicing fluid and some
    automobile antifreezes
    In cryonics

    (Wikipedia)

    (arrows courtesy thanatoid)

    --
    thanatoid-Tip® #1
    It's OK to talk with your mouth full as long as stuff doesn't
    fall out.
     
    thanatoid, Apr 20, 2006
    #11
  12. Margolotta

    Zitty Guest

    "Beck" <> wrote in message
    news:4446bd04$0$23181$...
    > Margolotta wrote:
    >> I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went to pick up
    >> a box of cornflakes. Next to said box was a packet of Kellogg's
    >> Crunchy NUT Cornflakes. On the side was the following allergy advice:
    >> -
    >>
    >> "This product contains nuts."
    >>
    >> And I was thinking - I damned well hope it does, or I'd be asking for
    >> my money back!
    >>
    >> Thinking this was a one off and that Kellogg's believed that
    >> particularly stupid people bought their products, I headed on over to
    >> the dairy section. Picking up a pint (sorry, 500ml) of Dairy Crest
    >> semi-skimmed, I noticed the following on the front of the carton.
    >> Yep, you guessed it: 'This product contains milk.' Well, DUH! If it
    >> didn't, the carton would be empty...
    >>
    >> And it was the same on 100s of other products; I saw sliced loaves
    >> bearing an announcement warning the consumer that they contained
    >> wheat, cartons of yoghurt with warnings that they contained milk and
    >> jars of peanut butter stating that it should not be consumed if one
    >> is allergic to peanuts!
    >>
    >> Okay, I realise companies have to cover themselves these days but,
    >> surely, if a nut-allergy sufferer is moronic enough to eat crunchy
    >> nut cornflakes, then they really deserve everything they get.
    >>
    >> Are companies *REALLY* so paranoid about being sued they have to put
    >> warnings on the most obvious of products?!

    >
    > The funniest time I saw that warning was actually on a packet of peanuts.


    I've seen similar - a packet of peanuts that said on the side "MAY contain
    nuts".
     
    Zitty, Apr 20, 2006
    #12
  13. X-No-Archive: YES
    philo [] has entered into testimony


    > Margolotta wrote:
    >> I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went to pick
    >> up a box of cornflakes. Next to said box was a packet of Kellogg's
    >> Crunchy NUT Cornflakes. On the side was the following allergy
    >> advice: -
    >>
    >> "This product contains nuts."
    >>
    >> And I was thinking - I damned well hope it does, or I'd be asking
    >> for my money back!
    >>

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > on a bottle of sleeping pills...the warning is:
    >
    > may cause drowsiness.


    On a canister of lighter fluid... the warning is:

    FLAMMABLE

    --

    Skepticult® Member# 581-00504-208
    ChadwickStone at Gmail dot com
    Usenet's most helpful netizen
    Hammer of Thor, March 2005
     
    Chadwick Stone©, Apr 20, 2006
    #13
  14. X-No-Archive: YES
    Margolotta [] has entered into
    testimony


    > I was shopping with my mother today in Sainsbury's. I went to pick up
    > a box of cornflakes. Next to said box was a packet of Kellogg's
    > Crunchy NUT Cornflakes. On the side was the following allergy advice:
    > -
    >
    > "This product contains nuts."


    So does this newsfroup.

    --

    Skepticult® Member# 581-00504-208
    ChadwickStone at Gmail dot com
    Usenet's most helpful netizen
    Hammer of Thor, March 2005
     
    Chadwick Stone©, Apr 20, 2006
    #14
  15. Margolotta

    philo Guest

    <snip>
    >>
    >>"This product contains nuts."

    >
    >
    > So does this newsfroup.
    >



    newsfroup...? <G>
     
    philo, Apr 20, 2006
    #15
  16. X-No-Archive: YES
    philo [] has entered into testimony


    > <snip>
    >>>
    >>> "This product contains nuts."

    >>
    >>
    >> So does this newsfroup.
    >>

    >
    >
    > newsfroup...? <G>


    Yes... newsfroup.

    --

    Skepticult® Member# 581-00504-208
    ChadwickStone at Gmail dot com
    Usenet's most helpful netizen
    Hammer of Thor, March 2005
     
    Chadwick Stone©, Apr 20, 2006
    #16
  17. Margolotta

    Mara Guest

    On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 23:58:47 GMT, "Zitty" <moc.dlrowltn@esuba> wrote:

    >
    >"Beck" <> wrote in message
    >news:4446bd04$0$23181$...


    <snip>
    >>
    >> The funniest time I saw that warning was actually on a packet of peanuts.

    >
    >I've seen similar - a packet of peanuts that said on the side "MAY contain
    >nuts".


    This is from my files, just as I received it:

    Sign in Japanese public bath: FOREIGN GUESTS ARE REQUESTED NOT TO PULL COCK
    IN TUB.

    Tokyo hotel's rules and regulations: GUESTS ARE REQUESTED NOT TO SMOKE OR DO
    OTHER DISGUSTING BEHAVIOURS IN BED.

    In a Bangkok temple: IT IS FORBIDDEN TO ENTER A WOMAN EVEN A FOREIGNER IF
    DRESSED AS A MAN.

    Hotel brochure, Italy: THIS HOTEL IS RENOWNED FOR ITS PEACE AND SOLITUDE.
    IN FACT, CROWDS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD FLOCK HERE TO ENJOY ITS SOLITUDE.

    Hotel lobby, Bucharest: THE LIFT IS BEING FIXED FOR THE NEXT DAY. DURING
    THAT TIME WE REGRET THAT YOU WILL BE UNBEARABLE.

    Hotel, Yugoslavia: THE FLATTENING OF UNDERWEAR WITH PLEASURE IS THE JOB OF
    THE CHAMBERMAID.

    In the lobby of a Moscow hotel across from a Russian Orthodox monastery: YOU
    ARE WELCOME TO VISIT THE CEMETERY WHERE FAMOUS RUSSIAN AND SOVIET COMPOSERS,
    ARTISTS, AND WRITERS ARE BURIED DAILY EXCEPT THURSDAY.

    Taken from a menu, Poland: SALAD A FIRM'S OWN MAKE; LIMPID RED BEET SOUP
    WITH CHEESY DUMPLINGS IN THE FORM OF A FINGER; ROASTED DUCK LET LOOSE; BEEF
    RASHERS BEATEN IN THE COUNTRY PEOPLE'S FASHION.

    Supermarket, Hong Kong: FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, WE RECOMMEND COURTEOUS,
    EFFICIENT SELF-SERVICE.

    From the "Soviet Weekly": THERE WILL BE A MOSCOW EXHIBITION OF ARTS BY
    15,000 SOVIET REPUBLIC PAINTERS AND SCULPTORS. THESE WERE EXECUTED OVER THE
    PAST TWO YEARS.

    In an East African newspaper: A NEW SWIMMING POOL IS RAPIDLY TAKING SHAPE
    SINCE THE CONTRACTORS HAVE THROWN IN THE BULK OF THEIR WORKERS.

    A sign posted in Germany's Black Forest: IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN ON OUR
    BLACK FOREST CAMPING SITE THAT PEOPLE OF DIFFERENT SEX, FOR INSTANCE, MEN
    AND WOMEN, LIVE TOGETHER IN ONE TENT UNLESS THEY ARE MARRIED WITH EACH OTHER
    FOR THIS PURPOSE.

    Hotel, Zurich: BECAUSE OF THE IMPROPRIETY OF ENTERTAINING GUESTS OF THE
    OPPOSITE SEX IN THE BEDROOM, IT IS SUGGESTED THAT THE LOBBY BE USED FOR THIS
    PURPOSE.

    An advertisement by a Hong Kong dentist: TEETH EXTRACTED BY THE LATEST
    METHODISTS.

    A laundry in Rome: LADIES, LEAVE YOUR CLOTHES HERE AND SPEND THE AFTERNOON
    HAVING A GOOD TIME.

    Tourist agency, Czechoslovakia: TAKE ONE OF OUR HORSE-DRIVEN CITY TOURS. WE
    GUARANTEE NO MISCARRIAGES.

    Advertisement for donkey rides, Thailand: WOULD YOU LIKE TO RIDE ON YOUR OWN
    ASS?

    The box of a clockwork toy made in Hong Kong: GUARANTEED TO WORK THROUGHOUT
    ITS USEFUL LIFE.

    Airline ticket office, Copenhagen: WE TAKE YOUR BAGS AND SEND THEM IN ALL
    DIRECTIONS.

    On the door of a Moscow hotel room: IF THIS IS YOUR FIRST VISIT TO RUSSIA,
    YOU ARE WELCOME TO IT.

    --
    <Prowler> AB, do you know how to speak to the dead yet?
    <AB> ...
    <AB> Prowler: Yes. It's part of RCN Abuse training.
     
    Mara, Apr 20, 2006
    #17
  18. Mara wrote:

    > Tokyo hotel's rules and regulations: GUESTS ARE REQUESTED NOT TO SMOKE OR DO
    > OTHER DISGUSTING BEHAVIOURS IN BED.


    I'm sure this doesn't include Mazolla.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Apr 20, 2006
    #18
  19. Margolotta

    Jimchip Guest

    On 2006-04-19, thanatoid <> wrote:
    > Mara <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> http://makeashorterlink.com/?O30345CFC

    >
    > Thanks for the links. I THOUGHT I got the name wrong (not
    > getting any younger, but MUCH dumber), the stuff in food is
    > propylene glycol.
    >
    > Propylene glycol (C3H8O2; CAS no. 57-55-6), also known as 1,2-
    > propanediol, is a chemical compound (a diol alcohol), usually a
    > tasteless, odorless, and colorless clear oily liquid that is
    > hygroscopic and miscible with water. Its molar mass is 74 g/mol.
    >
    > Propylene glycol is used:
    >
    >==> as a moisturizer to maintain moisture in medicines,
    > cosmetics, food, and tobacco products,
    > As a flavoring agent in Angostura and Orange bitters
    >==> As a solvent for food colors and flavourings
    > As a humectant food additive, labeled as E number E1520
    > As a carrier in fragrance oils
    > As a food grade antifreeze
    > In smoke machines to make artificial smoke for use in
    > firefighters' training and theatrical productions
    > In hand sanitizers, antibacterial lotions, and saline solutions
    > As a main ingredient in many cosmetic products, including baby
    > wipes, bubble baths, and shampoos
    > As the primary ingredient in the "Paint" inside a Paintball
    >==> As a base ingredient in aircraft deicing fluid and some
    > automobile antifreezes
    > In cryonics
    >
    > (Wikipedia)
    >
    > (arrows courtesy thanatoid)


    When ethylene glcol was used as an antifreeze there were several incidents
    involving the draining of the radiator, followed by the ol' 'best friend'
    ROVER coming over and licking it all up (it tastes sweet). Poor ol' ROVER is
    able to biochemically oxidize ethylene glycol into oxalic acid. The oxalate
    precipitates calcium (Ca) and poor ol' ROVER dies of massive kidney failure-
    RIP, ROVER. (Rabbits eating too much rhubarb have a similar, sad, end)

    Propylene glycol does a similar thing in an animal but is oxidized to
    pyruvic acid which has no toxicity.

    --
    'just adding to the story'
     
    Jimchip, Apr 20, 2006
    #19
  20. Margolotta

    Mara Guest

    On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 20:59:38 -0400, Rôgêr <> wrote:

    >Mara wrote:
    >
    >> Tokyo hotel's rules and regulations: GUESTS ARE REQUESTED NOT TO SMOKE OR DO
    >> OTHER DISGUSTING BEHAVIOURS IN BED.

    >
    >I'm sure this doesn't include Mazolla.


    Or Wesson.

    But what about chocolate syrup and canned whipped cream?

    --
    <Prowler> AB, do you know how to speak to the dead yet?
    <AB> ...
    <AB> Prowler: Yes. It's part of RCN Abuse training.
     
    Mara, Apr 20, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. dennis

    jobs after becoming certified

    dennis, Jan 17, 2004, in forum: Microsoft Certification
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    445
  2. Dustin  Wyatt

    Cisco 804. Making it dumber

    Dustin Wyatt, Mar 28, 2006, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    427
    Dustin Wyatt
    Apr 10, 2006
  3. =?Utf-8?B?Q0QtUGlscw==?=

    The world cup reflects the real world!

    =?Utf-8?B?Q0QtUGlscw==?=, Jul 12, 2006, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    549
  4. Zachariah

    Re: Is the world becoming dumber?

    Zachariah, Apr 21, 2006, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    430
    Zachariah
    Apr 21, 2006
  5. Dean Matthews

    Survey shows Internet Explorer users are dumber

    Dean Matthews, Jul 30, 2011, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    973
    Ron McNulty
    Aug 6, 2011
Loading...

Share This Page