Is the Bcc field limited to a certain number of addresses?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Reg, Mar 2, 2006.

  1. Reg

    Reg Guest

    I am about to get involved in organising a conference where I will be
    sending out emails to lots of people. I realise I should be using the Bcc
    field to do this, but wonder if there is a limit to the number of addresses
    I can put into it?
    In searches for an answer which I did not find I did come across suggestions
    that the mail server can become overloaded if you send out a lot of emails
    too fast. Does that apply to a mail server run by a big ISP?
    Any advice gratefully received.
    Thanks
    Reg
    Reg, Mar 2, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Reg

    EMB Guest

    Reg wrote:
    > I am about to get involved in organising a conference where I will be
    > sending out emails to lots of people. I realise I should be using the Bcc
    > field to do this, but wonder if there is a limit to the number of addresses
    > I can put into it?
    > In searches for an answer which I did not find I did come across suggestions
    > that the mail server can become overloaded if you send out a lot of emails
    > too fast. Does that apply to a mail server run by a big ISP?
    > Any advice gratefully received.
    > Thanks
    > Reg
    >
    >

    A lot of ISPs will limit the number of recipients on a single email so
    as to discourage spamming.

    --
    EMB
    EMB, Mar 2, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 18:29:58 +1300, someone purporting to be Reg didst
    scrawl:

    > I am about to get involved in organising a conference where I will be
    > sending out emails to lots of people. I realise I should be using the Bcc
    > field to do this, but wonder if there is a limit to the number of addresses
    > I can put into it?


    The limit is usually a function of the e-mail software.

    > In searches for an answer which I did not find I did come across suggestions
    > that the mail server can become overloaded if you send out a lot of emails
    > too fast. Does that apply to a mail server run by a big ISP?
    > Any advice gratefully received.


    Any mail server admin will eventually become irate if you're sending large
    quantities of mail, it doesn't matter how significant the organisation is
    - often the larger ones will be more readily grumpy than smaller ones,
    since they're more likely to have dedicated mail system administrators who
    keep an eye on things.
    Contact your ISP and ask them what their rules are regarding mass e-mail.
    If nothing else you're going to want to ensure that you don't get flagged
    as a potential spammer.

    The other option would be to install a local mail server that does direct
    mail delivery. Assuming that you're not on an ISP that filters SMTP
    connections, this will save their mail servers and also will likely be a
    lot less hassle for you as you will be able to tweak the maximum number of
    recipients.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
    Matthew Poole, Mar 2, 2006
    #3
  4. Reg

    Nova Guest

    Reg wrote:
    > I am about to get involved in organising a conference where I will be
    > sending out emails to lots of people. I realise I should be using the Bcc
    > field to do this, but wonder if there is a limit to the number of addresses
    > I can put into it?
    > In searches for an answer which I did not find I did come across suggestions
    > that the mail server can become overloaded if you send out a lot of emails
    > too fast. Does that apply to a mail server run by a big ISP?
    > Any advice gratefully received.
    > Thanks
    > Reg
    >
    >


    Spam restrictions will probably be the thing that get you (maximum
    number of rcpts per message etc)

    Line limit restrictions will not be an issue at all

    The BCC's (like any rcpt TO/CC's) are sent into the mail server one at a
    time on a line by themselves.
    Nova, Mar 2, 2006
    #4
  5. Reg wrote:
    > I am about to get involved in organising a conference where I will be
    > sending out emails to lots of people. I realise I should be using the Bcc
    > field to do this, but wonder if there is a limit to the number of addresses
    > I can put into it?
    > In searches for an answer which I did not find I did come across suggestions
    > that the mail server can become overloaded if you send out a lot of emails
    > too fast. Does that apply to a mail server run by a big ISP?
    > Any advice gratefully received.
    > Thanks


    One important point - To, Cc, and Bcc are the same thing. What appears
    in the message, and who the messages are actually sent to, are two
    different things. Normally Bcc is not included in the message, but there
    is no reason it can't be, and no limit to the number of people specified
    within the message in To/Cc/Bcc etc.

    Where there is a limit is in the number of recipients a mail server will
    accept mail for. There is actually an RFC-required minimum of 100
    recipients. This *should* be safe, except for the fact that some people,
    including ignorant morons at ISPs, will ignore this requirement and set
    it to a value of 20 or so. Some servers even default to similarly
    RFC-violating values. These servers may accept more recipients, but
    you'll probably find idiotic ideas like tar-pitting will slow you down,
    and your message may never arrive if it ever does get sent, because of
    spam filters and other such BS.

    So, I suggest sending to no more than 10-20 recipients at once. Sure,
    this is horribly wasteful of bandwidth, but until people wake up and
    realise the problem is not the spam, but the idiotic means people have
    dreamed up to filter it, then e-mail will remain unreliable.

    The Other Guy
    The Other Guy, Mar 2, 2006
    #5
  6. The Other Guy wrote:
    > Reg wrote:
    >> I am about to get involved in organising a conference where I will be
    >> sending out emails to lots of people. I realise I should be using the
    >> Bcc field to do this, but wonder if there is a limit to the number of
    >> addresses I can put into it?
    >> In searches for an answer which I did not find I did come across
    >> suggestions that the mail server can become overloaded if you send out
    >> a lot of emails too fast. Does that apply to a mail server run by a
    >> big ISP?
    >> Any advice gratefully received.
    >> Thanks

    >
    > One important point - To, Cc, and Bcc are the same thing. What appears
    > in the message, and who the messages are actually sent to, are two
    > different things. Normally Bcc is not included in the message, but there
    > is no reason it can't be, and no limit to the number of people specified
    > within the message in To/Cc/Bcc etc.
    >
    > Where there is a limit is in the number of recipients a mail server will
    > accept mail for. There is actually an RFC-required minimum of 100
    > recipients. This *should* be safe, except for the fact that some people,
    > including ignorant morons at ISPs, will ignore this requirement and set
    > it to a value of 20 or so. Some servers even default to similarly
    > RFC-violating values. These servers may accept more recipients, but
    > you'll probably find idiotic ideas like tar-pitting will slow you down,
    > and your message may never arrive if it ever does get sent, because of
    > spam filters and other such BS.
    >
    > So, I suggest sending to no more than 10-20 recipients at once. Sure,
    > this is horribly wasteful of bandwidth, but until people wake up and
    > realise the problem is not the spam, but the idiotic means people have
    > dreamed up to filter it, then e-mail will remain unreliable.
    >
    > The Other Guy


    Just one additional note. You should be using your own mail server as
    someone suggested, and real mail list software, not your client (which
    will have other limitations on line length etc). The important thing is
    that your mail processor must not send to too many recipients on (or
    relayed through) another server, since that is when you'll run in to
    these limits.

    The Other Guy
    The Other Guy, Mar 2, 2006
    #6
  7. Reg

    Rob J Guest

    In article <bxuNf.586$>,
    says...
    > I am about to get involved in organising a conference where I will be
    > sending out emails to lots of people. I realise I should be using the Bcc
    > field to do this, but wonder if there is a limit to the number of addresses
    > I can put into it?
    > In searches for an answer which I did not find I did come across suggestions
    > that the mail server can become overloaded if you send out a lot of emails
    > too fast. Does that apply to a mail server run by a big ISP?


    Many ISPs these days will send to a maximum number as an anti-spam
    message.

    If you can use a program that generates a separate message for each
    person that gets around it.
    Rob J, Mar 2, 2006
    #7
  8. Reg

    Nova Guest

    The Other Guy wrote:
    > Reg wrote:
    >> I am about to get involved in organising a conference where I will be
    >> sending out emails to lots of people. I realise I should be using the
    >> Bcc field to do this, but wonder if there is a limit to the number of
    >> addresses I can put into it?
    >> In searches for an answer which I did not find I did come across
    >> suggestions that the mail server can become overloaded if you send out
    >> a lot of emails too fast. Does that apply to a mail server run by a
    >> big ISP?
    >> Any advice gratefully received.
    >> Thanks

    >
    > One important point - To, Cc, and Bcc are the same thing. What appears
    > in the message, and who the messages are actually sent to, are two
    > different things. Normally Bcc is not included in the message, but there
    > is no reason it can't be,


    Except that it would entirely defeat the purpose of BCC :)
    But yes I get your point.

    and no limit to the number of people specified
    > within the message in To/Cc/Bcc etc.
    >
    > Where there is a limit is in the number of recipients a mail server will
    > accept mail for. There is actually an RFC-required minimum of 100
    > recipients. This *should* be safe, except for the fact that some people,
    > including ignorant morons at ISPs, will ignore this requirement and set
    > it to a value of 20 or so.


    Perhaps that is because ISP's have to deal with ignorant customers that
    can easily get them blacklisted with very tochy organisations such as
    yahoo and AOL. The rfc's governing SMTP 821,2821 were written years ago
    when spam wasn't such a problem and ISP's weren't so fast to slap bans
    on other ISP's for sending unwanted mail. So yes now some ISP's do
    limit their customers mail more, mainly for the benefit of the majority
    of their customers. While I think it would be nice if everyone could
    obey the rfc's strictly, as the rfc's haven't kept up with changes in
    the real world, obeying the rfc can put yourself at a disadvantage these
    days.



    Some servers even default to similarly
    > RFC-violating values. These servers may accept more recipients, but
    > you'll probably find idiotic ideas like tar-pitting will slow you down,
    > and your message may never arrive if it ever does get sent, because of
    > spam filters and other such BS.
    >
    > So, I suggest sending to no more than 10-20 recipients at once. Sure,
    > this is horribly wasteful of bandwidth, but until people wake up and
    > realise the problem is not the spam, but the idiotic means people have
    > dreamed up to filter it, then e-mail will remain unreliable.
    >
    > The Other Guy
    Nova, Mar 2, 2006
    #8
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Frisbee®
    Replies:
    37
    Views:
    1,086
  2. =?Utf-8?B?aG9yc2VmbHk=?=

    limited connectivity for limited users

    =?Utf-8?B?aG9yc2VmbHk=?=, Mar 24, 2006, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    785
  3. Martin
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    668
    Plato
    Oct 28, 2005
  4. Jim Willsher
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    426
    Jim Willsher
    May 5, 2006
  5. Brian W
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    15,248
    Chris M
    Jan 31, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page