Is standard DVD about to die?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by rander3127, Oct 3, 2004.

  1. rander3127

    rander3127 Guest

    I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    only have to replace them with the much superior
    HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    in "Videobusiness" about it.

    It's starting again, isn't it?
    First I dump $2000 in VHS tapes because I get into
    laserdisc, then when DVDs come along, I dump
    $6000 worth of laserdiscs to buy into DVDs.
    Now, $12,000 worth of DVDs.....
    rander3127, Oct 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. rander3127

    DVDfanatico Guest

    This may sound obvious, but if nobody bought DVD's now, there may not be a
    HD-DVD. It seems altruistic people would invest in current DVD technology so
    the future will exist while selfish people will just wait. If everyone waited,
    would DVD's fail and would there be an HD-DVD? DVD players started out at $300
    dollars or more and now you can get them for $30 bucks, but if everyone waited
    they would never drop in price, or maybe the market for them would crash and
    people would snap them up as soon as they hit 30 dollars. Technology can
    become almost like a religion. It's amazing . . .

    HTH
    -DVDfanatico

    Also >From: rander3127
    >Date: 10/2/2004 11:10 PM Pacific Standard Time
    >Message-id: <>
    >
    >I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    >said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    >only have to replace them with the much superior
    >HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    >in "Videobusiness" about it.
    >
    >It's starting again, isn't it?
    >First I dump $2000 in VHS tapes because I get into
    >laserdisc, then when DVDs come along, I dump
    >$6000 worth of laserdiscs to buy into DVDs.
    >Now, $12,000 worth of DVDs.....
    DVDfanatico, Oct 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. >It's starting again, isn't it?
    >First I dump $2000 in VHS tapes because I get into
    >laserdisc, then when DVDs come along, I dump
    >$6000 worth of laserdiscs to buy into DVDs.
    >Now, $12,000 worth of DVDs.....


    A suggestion: Don't dump your collections. No one's requiring you to buy the
    same movie in multiple formats.

    ('Course, then again, it was all the early LD-dumping that allowed me to buy
    titles for under a buck, including releases not yet on DVD. So... thanks!
    Keep up the good work!)
    Robert Morgan, Oct 3, 2004
    #3
  4. rander3127 wrote:

    > I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    > said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    > only have to replace them with the much superior
    > HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    > in "Videobusiness" about it.


    And it must be true...A VIDEO STORE GUY SAID IT!! :)

    Derek Janssen (well, there *is* a certain hierarchy of intelligence, I
    guess)
    Derek Janssen, Oct 3, 2004
    #4
  5. rander3127 <> wrote in
    news::

    > I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    > said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    > only have to replace them with the much superior
    > HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    > in "Videobusiness" about it.
    >
    > It's starting again, isn't it?


    *shrug* There's always something better. Enjoy the
    grass you have, instead of doing a spectral analysis.



    --

    Aaron J. Bossig

    http://www.GodsLabRat.com
    http://www.dvdverdict.com
    Aaron J. Bossig, Oct 3, 2004
    #5
  6. rander3127

    Mark W Guest

    "rander3127" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    > said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    > only have to replace them with the much superior
    > HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    > in "Videobusiness" about it.
    >
    > It's starting again, isn't it?
    > First I dump $2000 in VHS tapes because I get into
    > laserdisc, then when DVDs come along, I dump
    > $6000 worth of laserdiscs to buy into DVDs.
    > Now, $12,000 worth of DVDs.....
    >
    >


    Better dump them now!! Let me know where you dump them by the way.
    Mark W, Oct 3, 2004
    #6
  7. rander3127

    Alan Figgatt Guest

    rander3127 wrote:
    > I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    > said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    > only have to replace them with the much superior
    > HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    > in "Videobusiness" about it.
    >
    > It's starting again, isn't it?
    > First I dump $2000 in VHS tapes because I get into
    > laserdisc, then when DVDs come along, I dump
    > $6000 worth of laserdiscs to buy into DVDs.
    > Now, $12,000 worth of DVDs.....


    First, HD DVD or Blu Ray BDs are probably not coming out until the
    later part of 2005. Second, you need to have a HD TV to see the higher
    definition picture. While HD TV sales are taking off (plasma TV sales in
    the 2nd Qtr of 2004 were up 119% compared to 2nd Qtr 2003 for example),
    high def disks represents a double upgrade - new $$ player and $$ TV.
    The adoption of high def DVDs/BD will be slower than DVD.

    Finally, HD DVD or BD will be the same size as DVD and CDs. Unlike the
    switch from VHS or laserdiscs, the HD DVD/BD players will be backwardly
    compatible - they will play the DVD disks. The 12 cm disks are likely to
    be with us for quite a while longer.

    But, $6000 on Laserdisc and $12000 on DVDs? Rich, you know that could
    have brought some very nice telescopes which don't depreciate in value...

    Alan Figgatt
    Alan Figgatt, Oct 3, 2004
    #7
  8. "rander3127" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    > said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    > only have to replace them with the much superior
    > HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    > in "Videobusiness" about it.



    Don't throw your DVDs into the garbage just yet. The long range success
    of any video format depends upon MASS consumer acceptance. While
    LaserDiscs made a decent contribution to the advance of home video, they
    had three major problems which kept them from replacing VHS:

    LaserDisc players were expensive.

    LaserDiscs were expensive and fragile, with limited availability and
    virtually no rental outlets.

    LaserDiscs were large, had clumsy scene and chapter access and they
    needed to be turned over in order to play a complete movie.

    LaserDiscs rotted.

    DVD, on the other hand, solved all of the price, durability, scene
    access, rental availability and size problems inherent in LaserDiscs
    PLUS DVD added DTS, anamorphic video, seamless branching, angle viewing,
    multiple subtitles, multiple soundtracks and more. DVDs are so small and
    lightweight (under 1 ounce) that they can be rented by mail. I rent DVDs
    from Netflix all the time and I haven't set foot in a video rental store
    for nearly two years.

    While the general public could see the advantages of LaserDiscs, very
    few people were willing to invest in the format. DVD on the other hand
    represented a HUGE advance over VHS and LaserDisc and nearly everyone
    wanted to have DVD from the day it came out. Once prices of DVD players
    and discs dropped significantly, DVD literally took over.

    To the general public, the audio and video improvement offered by DVD
    was as vast as the Grand Canyon. However, to the general public, the
    audio and video improvement offered by HD DVDs will seem more like
    crossing the street. Besides, DVD required only an investment in a
    player, which was backward compatible with standard TV. In order to
    fully appreciate the advances of HD DVD, people will need to invest in
    expensive HD TVs and expensive HD players. Besides, isn't there an HD
    DVD format war going on? With exception of the brief appearance of DIVX,
    DVD had no format war.

    The acceptance of HD DVD will be very slow, compared to the acceptance
    of DVD. The success of HD DVD will depend upon its acceptance by Joe and
    Jane Six-pack, who are still buying and renting VHS. How can HD DVD ever
    take off when DVD is still catering to millions and millions of these
    people:

    Those who buy DVD/VHS combo players (complete with an RF jack!)

    Those who buy narrow screen versions of widescreen movies, such as
    Star Wars.

    Those who purchase conventional TVs without a 16:9 mode.

    Those who buy RF converters so that they can hook up their $29
    Wal-Mart DVD player to their conventional TV.

    These are the same people who are buying DVDs by the millions -- as long
    as most of them are priced well under $20. Will HD DVDs be expensive?
    High HD DVD prices will certainly put a damper on sales. On the other
    hand, hundreds of DVD titles, which were once priced between $25 and
    $35, are readily available in the $8 to $12 range, with many titles
    showing up in Wal-Mart's $5.50 bargain bins.

    Unfortunately, the average home video buyer is nowhere near ready to
    embrace HD DVD. As a result, the new HD DVD format will be hit driven
    and lesser titles will be available only on conventional DVD. And of
    course, there will be titles which will never come out on HD DVD, just
    as there are VHS titles which will never come out on conventional DVD.
    After all, how long did it take to get Star Wars on DVD?

    My prediction is that HD DVD will be nothing more than a niche market
    for many years.
    One-Shot Scot, Oct 3, 2004
    #8
  9. >Don't throw your DVDs into the garbage just yet. The long range success
    >of any video format depends upon MASS consumer acceptance. While
    >LaserDiscs made a decent contribution to the advance of home video, they
    >had three major problems which kept them from replacing VHS:
    >
    > LaserDisc players were expensive.


    DVD players were expensive to begin with also; mass acceptance brought
    the price down, just as it would have brought the price down of LD
    players.
    >
    > LaserDiscs were expensive and fragile, with limited availability and
    > virtually no rental outlets.
    >
    > LaserDiscs were large, had clumsy scene and chapter access and they
    > needed to be turned over in order to play a complete movie.
    >
    > LaserDiscs rotted.


    No argument there. I think a psychological factor may have been that they
    looked too much like LP records, which even in the early days of LD were
    on their way out.
    >
    >DVD, on the other hand, solved all of the price, durability, scene
    >access, rental availability and size problems inherent in LaserDiscs
    >PLUS DVD added DTS, anamorphic video, seamless branching, angle viewing,
    >multiple subtitles, multiple soundtracks and more. DVDs are so small and
    >lightweight (under 1 ounce) that they can be rented by mail. I rent DVDs
    >from Netflix all the time and I haven't set foot in a video rental store
    >for nearly two years.


    I think the convenience aspect sold DVDs more than the quality. Remember
    you're dealing with a mass of consumers who record movies off-air using
    EP speed on their VCRs.

    Does anyone know when or if HDTVs are going to be somewhat affordable.
    Usually electronics go down in price when they've been out a while, but
    the going rate for a 42" widescreen CRT projection set was about $1,000 a
    year ago. I checked yesterday and it still is. Seems most developement is
    going into making sets bigger, not smaller sets cheaper...

    Or when or if we'll see an affordable full HDTV resolution LCD or three
    panel DLP front projector...
    --
    Monte Castleman, <<Spamfilter in Use>>
    Bloomington, MN <<to email, remove the "q" from address>>
    Monte Castleman, Oct 3, 2004
    #9
  10. >LaserDiscs made a decent contribution to the advance of home video, they
    >had three major problems which kept them from replacing VHS:


    > LaserDiscs were expensive and fragile, with limited availability and
    > virtually no rental outlets.


    Prerecorded VHS was expensive as well, especially new releases. $99.95 was a
    common price for VHS, until studios finally figured out sellthrough made more
    sense. (And it seems like sell-through VHS prices took decades to drop from
    $30-40 to under $20 as well.)

    For movies where VHS MSRP was set at a sell-through point, I usually was able
    to pick up the LD release for perhaps $5 more. The cost wasn't that big a
    deal.

    > LaserDiscs were large, had clumsy scene and chapter access and they
    > needed to be turned over in order to play a complete movie.


    Granted on the size (though the public at large accepted vinyl LPs of the same
    size, with the same storage hassles, for decades) and flipping... but clumsy
    scene and chapter access? Most LDs had chapter stops, like a CD- push a button
    and you're at your desired scene. It was also possible to start playing at a
    specific frame/time. They sure beat the living hell out of VHS scene
    searching, and quite often beats the slow and quirky menu designs DVD authors
    often do for "fun."

    >LaserDiscs rotted.


    And VHS cassettes flaked apart, degraded with each viewing, got crumpled in bad
    players, tapes snapped, etc.

    Did you ever own a LD player, Scot?
    Robert Morgan, Oct 3, 2004
    #10
  11. rander3127

    rander3127 Guest

    On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 03:39:51 -0700, Derek Janssen
    <> wrote:

    >rander3127 wrote:
    >
    >> I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    >> said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    >> only have to replace them with the much superior
    >> HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    >> in "Videobusiness" about it.

    >
    >And it must be true...A VIDEO STORE GUY SAID IT!! :)


    Well, how many would go back to LD from DVD?
    Very few, I'd venture. So I expect that the same
    will be true of HD-DVD. If we weren't all looking
    for the next greatest thing, we'd all be watching
    video-CDs.
    rander3127, Oct 3, 2004
    #11
  12. rander3127

    rander3127 Guest

    On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 10:46:15 -0400, Alan Figgatt
    <> wrote:

    >rander3127 wrote:
    >> I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    >> said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    >> only have to replace them with the much superior
    >> HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    >> in "Videobusiness" about it.
    >>
    >> It's starting again, isn't it?
    >> First I dump $2000 in VHS tapes because I get into
    >> laserdisc, then when DVDs come along, I dump
    >> $6000 worth of laserdiscs to buy into DVDs.
    >> Now, $12,000 worth of DVDs.....

    >
    > First, HD DVD or Blu Ray BDs are probably not coming out until the
    >later part of 2005. Second, you need to have a HD TV to see the higher
    >definition picture. While HD TV sales are taking off (plasma TV sales in
    >the 2nd Qtr of 2004 were up 119% compared to 2nd Qtr 2003 for example),
    >high def disks represents a double upgrade - new $$ player and $$ TV.
    >The adoption of high def DVDs/BD will be slower than DVD.
    >
    > Finally, HD DVD or BD will be the same size as DVD and CDs. Unlike the
    >switch from VHS or laserdiscs, the HD DVD/BD players will be backwardly
    >compatible - they will play the DVD disks. The 12 cm disks are likely to
    >be with us for quite a while longer.
    >
    > But, $6000 on Laserdisc and $12000 on DVDs? Rich, you know that could
    >have brought some very nice telescopes which don't depreciate in value...
    >
    > Alan Figgatt


    The amount I've spend on those dwarfs the DVD expenditure.
    rander3127, Oct 3, 2004
    #12
  13. "Robert Morgan" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >LaserDiscs made a decent contribution to the advance of home video,
    >they had three major problems which kept them from replacing VHS:


    > LaserDiscs were expensive and fragile, with limited availability and
    > virtually no rental outlets.


    <<Prerecorded VHS was expensive as well, especially new releases.
    $99.95 was a common price for VHS, until studios finally figured out
    sellthrough made more sense. (And it seems like sell-through VHS prices
    took decades to drop from $30-40 to under $20 as well.)>>

    From some studios, the $99 VHS tapes from the initial run had much
    better quality than the high speed, pasty-looking dupes that later got
    released at $20.

    <<For movies where VHS MSRP was set at a sell-through point, I usually
    was able to pick up the LD release for perhaps $5 more. The cost wasn't
    that big a deal.>>

    > LaserDiscs were large, had clumsy scene and chapter access and they
    > needed to be turned over in order to play a complete movie.


    <<Granted on the size (though the public at large accepted vinyl LPs of
    the same size, with the same storage hassles, for decades) and
    flipping... but clumsy scene and chapter access? Most LDs had chapter
    stops, like a CD- push a button and you're at your desired scene. It
    was also possible to start playing at a specific frame/time. They sure
    beat the living hell out of VHS scene searching, and quite often beats
    the slow and quirky menu designs DVD authors often do for "fun.">>

    You could only access the chapters that were located on the side of the
    LaserDisc that was playing. While DVD access is nearly instantaneous,
    LaserDisc access could take a while. Any movie over 2 hours would be
    presented on 3 or more sides. If a movie were 2 hours, 8 minutes long
    (128 minutes total) for example, the content was usually spread out
    evenly, so that each disk side had around 45 minutes of material. For
    some reason, most 90 minute movies were done up with 60 minutes on the
    first side and 30 minutes on the second side.

    Unless you had a digital player, you could not do freeze frame or slow
    motion unless the disk was done in CAV. While CLV disks had 60 minute
    per side capability, CAV disks were limited to 30 minutes per side.
    Digital audio was not backward compatible with earlier players. The old
    top load LaserDisc players were noisy and they created a lot of heat.
    Some disks left in these players after they stopped spinning were warped
    into bowl-shapes.

    >LaserDiscs rotted.


    <<And VHS cassettes flaked apart, degraded with each viewing, got
    crumpled in bad players, tapes snapped, etc.>>

    <<Did you ever own a LD player, Scot?>>

    Yes and I still have it. I bought a Pioneer LD700 when it first came out
    for $700. This was the first of the cool-running drawer-load models. If
    the 1933 version of _King Kong_ ever comes out on Region 1 DVD, I am
    going to scrap this LaserDisc player.
    One-Shot Scot, Oct 3, 2004
    #13
  14. rander3127 wrote:

    >> But, $6000 on Laserdisc and $12000 on DVDs? Rich, you know that could
    >>have brought some very nice telescopes which don't depreciate in value...

    >
    > The amount I've spend on those dwarfs


    Yeah, the food bills, and the long distance, and they won't even go
    halves on the cable...Ungrateful little bastards!

    Trust us, just kick 'em out, keeping them around the apartment just
    isn't worth it.

    Derek Janssen (watch, he's going to pretend nobody said anything, and
    try to "rescue" THIS post back into the thread, too)
    Derek Janssen, Oct 3, 2004
    #14
  15. rander3127

    VBV20 Guest


    >"Don't buy DVDs because you will
    >only have to replace them with the much superior
    >HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    >in "Videobusiness" about it.
    >


    The thing that irritates me is how quick everyone is to freak out about HD
    DVDs. I don't recall everybody trashing their collections when DATs and
    miniCDs came out to compete with CDs or when the superior S-VHS tapes came out
    to compete with VHS.

    It is MUCH too soon for a new format to take over, and I think it's very
    doubtful HD DVDs are gonna sweep the nation and replace DVDs. Hell, VHS
    reigned supreme for a generation before DVDs came along. (Yeah I know LDs were
    around, but let's be honest, and this is coming from a guy with a decent LD
    collection, that format never really took off with the public.) You really
    think HD DVDs are gonna wipe out the DVD market? Unless they make them
    backwards compatible, I just don't see them catching on except with the niche
    videophile crowd. It's too soon.
    VBV20, Oct 4, 2004
    #15
  16. rander3127

    Bur Guest

    Monte Castleman <> wrote in message news:<1jW7d.2388$>...

    > Does anyone know when or if HDTVs are going to be somewhat affordable.
    > Usually electronics go down in price when they've been out a while, but
    > the going rate for a 42" widescreen CRT projection set was about $1,000 a
    > year ago. I checked yesterday and it still is. Seems most developement is
    > going into making sets bigger, not smaller sets cheaper...
    >
    > Or when or if we'll see an affordable full HDTV resolution LCD or three
    > panel DLP front projector...


    Even though Intel has goten a little behind on their LCOS development,
    others aren't waiting. DLP and LCD TVs are looking better every day.
    I suspect we will start seeing the big volume price breaks in about a
    year as people realize there is HD content available and the HD
    experience has improved greatly and no longer requires gritting your
    teeth as the picture breaks apart and reforms when something moves too
    fast. The HD DVD is a critical component, supplying a HD recorded
    image for home viewing. The HD DVD will be instantly popular with HDTV
    owners, and, will be an awsome selling point for HDTV. I don't think
    you will see a 19" HDTV for $69 any time soon, but HDTVs that fit most
    people's budget are not far off. Standard DVDs won't go away tomorrow
    but 5 years from now I wouldn't be surprised to see HD DVD with half
    the total DVD sales.
    Bur, Oct 4, 2004
    #16
  17. rander3127

    rander3127 Guest

    My sense is this, based on what happened with DVD;
    People are buying more HD capable TV sets so they'll
    want to exploit them. They will also not balk at the pricing
    of HD-DVD because DVDs were $30-$45 at first. Of course,
    there will be the late adopters, and HD-DVD will need something like
    the marketing that DVD received, in other words, huge.
    Rental will be a big help to introduce the product though sales will
    be the initial promoter.
    What I DO hope this does is to help GET RID of 4:3 televisions.
    With more and more broadcast television going HD or WS,
    HD-DVD will add to the pressure to finally rid ourselves of this
    78 year old standard.
    I just hope HD-DVD doesn't end up like HD-LD.
    rander3127, Oct 4, 2004
    #17
  18. On Sun, 3 Oct 2004 09:23:18 -0700, "One-Shot Scot" <>
    wrote:

    >"rander3127" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> I was in a video store the other day and the owner
    >> said to a guy, "Don't buy DVDs because you will
    >> only have to replace them with the much superior
    >> HD DVDs coming." Then he points out a story
    >> in "Videobusiness" about it.

    >
    >
    >Don't throw your DVDs into the garbage just yet. The long range success
    >of any video format depends upon MASS consumer acceptance. While
    >LaserDiscs made a decent contribution to the advance of home video, they
    >had three major problems which kept them from replacing VHS:
    >
    > LaserDisc players were expensive.
    >
    > LaserDiscs were expensive and fragile, with limited availability and
    > virtually no rental outlets.
    >
    > LaserDiscs were large, had clumsy scene and chapter access and they
    > needed to be turned over in order to play a complete movie.
    >
    > LaserDiscs rotted.
    >
    >DVD, on the other hand, solved all of the price, durability, scene
    >access, rental availability and size problems inherent in LaserDiscs
    >PLUS DVD added DTS, anamorphic video, seamless branching, angle viewing,
    >multiple subtitles, multiple soundtracks and more. DVDs are so small and
    >lightweight (under 1 ounce) that they can be rented by mail. I rent DVDs
    >from Netflix all the time and I haven't set foot in a video rental store
    >for nearly two years.
    >
    >While the general public could see the advantages of LaserDiscs, very
    >few people were willing to invest in the format. DVD on the other hand
    >represented a HUGE advance over VHS and LaserDisc and nearly everyone
    >wanted to have DVD from the day it came out. Once prices of DVD players
    >and discs dropped significantly, DVD literally took over.
    >
    >To the general public, the audio and video improvement offered by DVD
    >was as vast as the Grand Canyon. However, to the general public, the
    >audio and video improvement offered by HD DVDs will seem more like
    >crossing the street. Besides, DVD required only an investment in a
    >player, which was backward compatible with standard TV. In order to
    >fully appreciate the advances of HD DVD, people will need to invest in
    >expensive HD TVs and expensive HD players. Besides, isn't there an HD
    >DVD format war going on? With exception of the brief appearance of DIVX,
    >DVD had no format war.
    >
    >The acceptance of HD DVD will be very slow, compared to the acceptance
    >of DVD. The success of HD DVD will depend upon its acceptance by Joe and
    >Jane Six-pack, who are still buying and renting VHS. How can HD DVD ever
    >take off when DVD is still catering to millions and millions of these
    >people:
    >
    > Those who buy DVD/VHS combo players (complete with an RF jack!)
    >
    > Those who buy narrow screen versions of widescreen movies, such as
    > Star Wars.
    >
    > Those who purchase conventional TVs without a 16:9 mode.
    >
    > Those who buy RF converters so that they can hook up their $29
    > Wal-Mart DVD player to their conventional TV.
    >
    >These are the same people who are buying DVDs by the millions -- as long
    >as most of them are priced well under $20. Will HD DVDs be expensive?
    >High HD DVD prices will certainly put a damper on sales. On the other
    >hand, hundreds of DVD titles, which were once priced between $25 and
    >$35, are readily available in the $8 to $12 range, with many titles
    >showing up in Wal-Mart's $5.50 bargain bins.
    >
    >Unfortunately, the average home video buyer is nowhere near ready to
    >embrace HD DVD. As a result, the new HD DVD format will be hit driven
    >and lesser titles will be available only on conventional DVD. And of
    >course, there will be titles which will never come out on HD DVD, just
    >as there are VHS titles which will never come out on conventional DVD.
    >After all, how long did it take to get Star Wars on DVD?
    >
    >My prediction is that HD DVD will be nothing more than a niche market
    >for many years.
    >


    Excellent post.
    Prince of Orange, Oct 4, 2004
    #18
  19. Wondering if any of these HD DVD type players will be usable on these
    ancient component-video only HDTVs that some of us have... or will they
    all be copy-protected out the ying yang...
    Frank Malczewski, Oct 4, 2004
    #19
  20. "Monte Castleman" <> wrote in message
    news:1jW7d.2388$...
    >
    > No argument there. I think a psychological factor may have been that they
    > looked too much like LP records, which even in the early days of LD were
    > on their way out.
    > >


    I actually worked in the retail trade when LaserDiscs first made their
    appearance. There was just the one feature of LaserDisc, that more or less
    stopped it dead in the mass market. It was the one feature that no one has
    mentioned so far (that I have read).

    The feature?

    Well, actually it was a lack of a feature. You couldn't record on them.

    Ian.
    Electric Fan Club, Oct 4, 2004
    #20
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