Is my ClamWin AV working?

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by JP, Jun 3, 2006.

  1. JP

    JP Guest

    While looking for a suitable antivirus product for this AMD64 Windows XP
    Pro 64Bit Edition machine, I came across ClamWin, amongst others. It
    installed perfectly and also downloaded the definition updates.

    Task Manager shows the process running with a *32 notation which I take to
    mean it is running in 32bit mode.

    My question is whether the product is protecting the machine to its full
    potential while running in this 32bit mode or should I look for some other
    product (avast! for example) that runs in "true" 64bit mode - as I read
    somewhere.

    Regards and thanks.

    JP
    ---
     
    JP, Jun 3, 2006
    #1
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  2. If it shows up in Task Manager it is running. It is also not unusual that
    you find things with only the barest necessities being compiled to 64bit. I
    do believe I've heard that Avast uses the same concept, and that works fine
    here.

    Tony. . .


    "JP" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > While looking for a suitable antivirus product for this AMD64 Windows XP
    > Pro 64Bit Edition machine, I came across ClamWin, amongst others. It
    > installed perfectly and also downloaded the definition updates.
    >
    > Task Manager shows the process running with a *32 notation which I take
    > to mean it is running in 32bit mode.
    >
    > My question is whether the product is protecting the machine to its full
    > potential while running in this 32bit mode or should I look for some other
    > product (avast! for example) that runs in "true" 64bit mode - as I read
    > somewhere.
    >
    > Regards and thanks.
    >
    > JP
    > ---
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, Jun 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. JP

    JP Guest

    Thanks for the reassuring response. I guess I'll stick with ClamWin for now.

    I was not too sure because, though I have heard about ClamWin before, it was
    kinda overshadowed by other products as AntiVir (now Avira) and avast!

    Regards, and thanks again.

    JP
    ----

    "Tony Sperling" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > If it shows up in Task Manager it is running. It is also not unusual that
    > you find things with only the barest necessities being compiled to 64bit.
    > I do believe I've heard that Avast uses the same concept, and that works
    > fine here.
    >
    > Tony. . .
    >
    >
    > "JP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> While looking for a suitable antivirus product for this AMD64 Windows XP
    >> Pro 64Bit Edition machine, I came across ClamWin, amongst others. It
    >> installed perfectly and also downloaded the definition updates.
    >>
    >> Task Manager shows the process running with a *32 notation which I take
    >> to mean it is running in 32bit mode.
    >>
    >> My question is whether the product is protecting the machine to its full
    >> potential while running in this 32bit mode or should I look for some
    >> other product (avast! for example) that runs in "true" 64bit mode - as I
    >> read somewhere.
    >>
    >> Regards and thanks.
    >>
    >> JP
    >> ---
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    JP, Jun 4, 2006
    #3
  4. JP

    Graham Guest

    JP wrote:

    > Thanks for the reassuring response. I guess I'll stick with ClamWin for now.
    >
    > I was not too sure because, though I have heard about ClamWin before, it was
    > kinda overshadowed by other products as AntiVir (now Avira) and avast!


    A/V vendors may have pseudo-virus files which can be used to check
    whether detection is working (i.e. files which should be detected but
    which aren't actually viruses). Some make these freely available, some
    don't: it might be worth asking whoever makes ClamAV if they have one.
    Note that one A/V vendor's test files will probably *not* be detected by
    another A/V program.

    Graham.
     
    Graham, Jun 4, 2006
    #4
  5. Clam is well known in the Linux community, and rather highly regarded too, I
    believe. Anyone familiar with it, will have no reason to change over. I
    wasn't aware that they made a Windows version, if it turns out to be 'buggy'
    or ill behaved, there are excellent free alternatives, though.

    P.S. - You will be welcome to report back when you have collected some
    experience with it - nice to be informed of what is out there.

    And Graham, I think you are right, but there should be a regular test site
    with bogus vira that any scanner should uncover - can't remember the name
    though.


    Tony. . .


    "Graham" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > JP wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for the reassuring response. I guess I'll stick with ClamWin for
    >> now.
    >>
    >> I was not too sure because, though I have heard about ClamWin before, it
    >> was kinda overshadowed by other products as AntiVir (now Avira) and
    >> avast!

    >
    > A/V vendors may have pseudo-virus files which can be used to check whether
    > detection is working (i.e. files which should be detected but which aren't
    > actually viruses). Some make these freely available, some don't: it might
    > be worth asking whoever makes ClamAV if they have one. Note that one A/V
    > vendor's test files will probably *not* be detected by another A/V
    > program.
    >
    > Graham.
     
    Tony Sperling, Jun 4, 2006
    #5
  6. JP

    JP Guest

    Hi Tony,

    Appreciate your input. I did some reading on ClamWin and discovered that
    Clam indeed is pretty well known in the non-windows community! ClamWin (as
    the name implies) is its entry into Windows.

    I am removing the utility shortly however. I discovered that it does not
    provide real-time scanning!

    http://www.clamwin.com/content/view/71/63/

    A pity, I was starting to like it for the fact that it introduces just two
    running processes into the system!

    I shall be checking out available options and make a decision before the end
    of the day. A rather hot one in SoCal, if I may add!

    Cheerio.

    JP
    ----


    "Tony Sperling" <> wrote in message
    news:uh%...
    > Clam is well known in the Linux community, and rather highly regarded too,
    > I believe. Anyone familiar with it, will have no reason to change over. I
    > wasn't aware that they made a Windows version, if it turns out to be
    > 'buggy' or ill behaved, there are excellent free alternatives, though.
    >
    > P.S. - You will be welcome to report back when you have collected some
    > experience with it - nice to be informed of what is out there.
    >
    > And Graham, I think you are right, but there should be a regular test site
    > with bogus vira that any scanner should uncover - can't remember the name
    > though.
    >
    >
    > Tony. . .
    >
    >
    > "Graham" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> JP wrote:
    >>
    >>> Thanks for the reassuring response. I guess I'll stick with ClamWin for
    >>> now.
    >>>
    >>> I was not too sure because, though I have heard about ClamWin before, it
    >>> was kinda overshadowed by other products as AntiVir (now Avira) and
    >>> avast!

    >>
    >> A/V vendors may have pseudo-virus files which can be used to check
    >> whether detection is working (i.e. files which should be detected but
    >> which aren't actually viruses). Some make these freely available, some
    >> don't: it might be worth asking whoever makes ClamAV if they have one.
    >> Note that one A/V vendor's test files will probably *not* be detected by
    >> another A/V program.
    >>
    >> Graham.

    >
    >
     
    JP, Jun 4, 2006
    #6
  7. Well, the prime reason that I like Avast is that it sits there and it
    doesn't burden the machine in any way that I can notice, and if you set it
    to auto update it will update the database up to several times a day and the
    program itself as soon as it is released. You can download it for a 60 day
    free trial, after that you will have to register (costless!) and that will
    give you a full year + one month (I think? - still free!) and then you
    register again (same procedure). If you'd like to see it working, you can
    download a set of Boot Schemes for WindowsBlinds or whatever, that'll set it
    off hooting. Not that the files are infected, but they incorporate tweaked
    Windows system files (NTOSKRNL) and so don't compare to the original.

    As I said, there are others that have excellent mentioning in this
    community, but I happen to like this one.


    Tony. . .


    "JP" <> wrote in message
    news:eaI0X1$...
    > Hi Tony,
    >
    > Appreciate your input. I did some reading on ClamWin and discovered that
    > Clam indeed is pretty well known in the non-windows community! ClamWin (as
    > the name implies) is its entry into Windows.
    >
    > I am removing the utility shortly however. I discovered that it does not
    > provide real-time scanning!
    >
    > http://www.clamwin.com/content/view/71/63/
    >
    > A pity, I was starting to like it for the fact that it introduces just two
    > running processes into the system!
    >
    > I shall be checking out available options and make a decision before the
    > end
    > of the day. A rather hot one in SoCal, if I may add!
    >
    > Cheerio.
    >
    > JP
    > ----
    >
    >
    > "Tony Sperling" <> wrote in message
    > news:uh%...
    >> Clam is well known in the Linux community, and rather highly regarded
    >> too,
    >> I believe. Anyone familiar with it, will have no reason to change over. I
    >> wasn't aware that they made a Windows version, if it turns out to be
    >> 'buggy' or ill behaved, there are excellent free alternatives, though.
    >>
    >> P.S. - You will be welcome to report back when you have collected some
    >> experience with it - nice to be informed of what is out there.
    >>
    >> And Graham, I think you are right, but there should be a regular test
    >> site
    >> with bogus vira that any scanner should uncover - can't remember the name
    >> though.
    >>
    >>
    >> Tony. . .
    >>
    >>
    >> "Graham" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> JP wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Thanks for the reassuring response. I guess I'll stick with ClamWin for
    >>>> now.
    >>>>
    >>>> I was not too sure because, though I have heard about ClamWin before,
    >>>> it
    >>>> was kinda overshadowed by other products as AntiVir (now Avira) and
    >>>> avast!
    >>>
    >>> A/V vendors may have pseudo-virus files which can be used to check
    >>> whether detection is working (i.e. files which should be detected but
    >>> which aren't actually viruses). Some make these freely available, some
    >>> don't: it might be worth asking whoever makes ClamAV if they have one.
    >>> Note that one A/V vendor's test files will probably *not* be detected by
    >>> another A/V program.
    >>>
    >>> Graham.

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, Jun 4, 2006
    #7
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