Is It Legal To Install Windows 7 32 Bit and 64 Bit On Same PC?

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Larry Lindstrom, May 25, 2010.

  1. Hi Folks:

    I'm an independent software developer, still using 32 bit XP Pro. A
    client just moved from Vista to 32 bit Windows 7. Other clients will be
    moving to Windows 7 and I'd like to be able to test my builds for each.

    I'm getting Win 7 Ultimate retail full. Can both 64 and 32 bit
    versions be installed on different partitions or drives of the same PC
    with one key?

    If it is legal to have both operating systems installed at the same
    time, is there a method to to setup Visual Studio 2008 Pro so one
    install is accessible to both versions of Windows 7? This means, among
    other things, setting up each OS's registry.

    It won't be a tragedy to install VS 2008 on the 64 bit Windows 7 as
    long as I can select 32 or 64 bit builds.

    I'm a first timer to this group, so I perused some of the threads
    before posting from Google Groubs, but that seems to offend at least
    somebody. Why is XS11E killing all posts from Google Groups?

    Sorry to hear that Microsoft is dropping support for this and other
    newsgroups. I also prefer this format to forums.

    Perhaps it's time to think about other platforms.

    Thanks
    Larry
     
    Larry Lindstrom, May 25, 2010
    #1
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  2. A Windows licence is for one installation on one machine only. You must
    choose either the 32 or the 64-bit version.

    Have you considered becoming a Microsoft Partner and getting an Action
    Pack? https://partner.microsoft.com/40016455


    On 25/05/2010 15:21, Larry Lindstrom wrote:
    > Hi Folks:
    >
    > I'm an independent software developer, still using 32 bit XP Pro. A
    > client just moved from Vista to 32 bit Windows 7. Other clients will be
    > moving to Windows 7 and I'd like to be able to test my builds for each.
    >
    > I'm getting Win 7 Ultimate retail full. Can both 64 and 32 bit versions
    > be installed on different partitions or drives of the same PC with one key?
    >
    > If it is legal to have both operating systems installed at the same
    > time, is there a method to to setup Visual Studio 2008 Pro so one
    > install is accessible to both versions of Windows 7? This means, among
    > other things, setting up each OS's registry.
    >
    > It won't be a tragedy to install VS 2008 on the 64 bit Windows 7 as long
    > as I can select 32 or 64 bit builds.
    >
    > I'm a first timer to this group, so I perused some of the threads before
    > posting from Google Groubs, but that seems to offend at least somebody.
    > Why is XS11E killing all posts from Google Groups?
    >
    > Sorry to hear that Microsoft is dropping support for this and other
    > newsgroups. I also prefer this format to forums.
    >
    > Perhaps it's time to think about other platforms.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Larry
     
    Dominic Payer, May 25, 2010
    #2
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  3. No. The license is for a single installation of either the 32-bit
    version or the 64-bit version but not both. The following is from the
    Microsoft End User's License Agreement:


    MICROSOFT SOFTWARE LICENSE TERMS
    WINDOWS 7 ULTIMATE


    2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.
    a. One Copy per Computer. You may install one copy of the software on
    one computer. That computer is the “licensed computer.”
    b. Licensed Computer. You may use the software on up to two processors
    on the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in these
    license terms, you may not use the software on any other computer.
    c. Number of Users. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms,
    only one user may use the software at a time.
    d. Alternative Versions. The software may include more than one version,
    such as 32-bit and 64-bit. You may install and use only one version at
    one time.

    I don't know about Visual Studio.


    On 2010-05-25 10:21, Larry Lindstrom wrote:
    > Hi Folks:
    >
    > I'm an independent software developer, still using 32 bit XP Pro. A
    > client just moved from Vista to 32 bit Windows 7. Other clients will be
    > moving to Windows 7 and I'd like to be able to test my builds for each.
    >
    > I'm getting Win 7 Ultimate retail full. Can both 64 and 32 bit versions
    > be installed on different partitions or drives of the same PC with one key?
    >
    > If it is legal to have both operating systems installed at the same
    > time, is there a method to to setup Visual Studio 2008 Pro so one
    > install is accessible to both versions of Windows 7? This means, among
    > other things, setting up each OS's registry.
    >
    > It won't be a tragedy to install VS 2008 on the 64 bit Windows 7 as long
    > as I can select 32 or 64 bit builds.
    >
    > I'm a first timer to this group, so I perused some of the threads before
    > posting from Google Groubs, but that seems to offend at least somebody.
    > Why is XS11E killing all posts from Google Groups?
    >
    > Sorry to hear that Microsoft is dropping support for this and other
    > newsgroups. I also prefer this format to forums.
    >
    > Perhaps it's time to think about other platforms.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Larry
     
    Bobby Johnson, May 25, 2010
    #3
  4. But how many times can you activate with the same Windows 7 key?


    On 2010-05-25 11:17, Jeff Gaines wrote:
    > On 25/05/2010 in message <htgme4$pc$-september.org> Larry
    > Lindstrom wrote:
    >
    >> I'm getting Win 7 Ultimate retail full. Can both 64 and 32 bit
    >> versions be installed on different partitions or drives of the same PC
    >> with one key?

    >
    > It may depend where you are. MSFT in the UK have confirmed in a
    > telephone call that you can install as many copies as you like of XP on
    > one PC as long as you can only use one at a time. This is probably the
    > approach UK courts would take.
    >
    > It may well be very different in other countries.
    >
     
    Bobby Johnson, May 25, 2010
    #4
  5. On 5/25/2010 8:17 AM, Jeff Gaines wrote:
    > On 25/05/2010 in message <htgme4$pc$-september.org> Larry
    > Lindstrom wrote:
    >
    >> I'm getting Win 7 Ultimate retail full. Can both 64 and 32 bit
    >> versions be installed on different partitions or drives of the same PC
    >> with one key?


    Thanks Everyone
     
    Larry Lindstrom, May 25, 2010
    #5
  6. Larry Lindstrom

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Larry.

    Legal? I don't know. I'm not a lawyer. My own interpretation is that is
    SHOULD be like Jeff Gaines describes as the rule in the UK: "you can
    install as many copies as you like of XP on one PC as long as you can only
    use one at a time."

    That's what I've been doing for years on my only computer. While
    beta-testing Vista, at one point I had 8 Windows (XP and multiple Vista beta
    builds, 32-bit and 64-bit) installed simultaneously. With these beta
    builds, I didn't have to worry about RTM license issues. And I still have a
    few multiple installations for testing only, using MSDN keys, alongside the
    single Ultimate x64 that is my "daily driver".

    > If it is legal to have both operating systems installed at the same time,
    > is there a method to to setup Visual Studio 2008 Pro so one install is
    > accessible to both versions of Windows 7? This means, among other things,
    > setting up each OS's registry.


    I know nothing of Visual Studio, any version.

    But I have had some experience with running a single application from
    multiple Windows installations on my one computer. Quicken may be my best
    example. Since Quicken for Windows first replaced the DOS version, I've
    always installed successive versions of Quicken into E:\QuickenW, rather
    than into the default location. Drive E: is a logical drive that has no OS
    on it, but is accessible from any Windows installation on my computer. I
    can enter checks while running WinXP x86 in the morning, then read those
    same entries after rebooting into Win7 x64 in the afternoon. (It has been
    several years since I've run WinXP, but I'm sure it would still work.)

    But if you install an application into the default Program Files folder, you
    will have major headaches (aside from license issues) in trying to use it
    from both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows! When 64-bit Windows first appeared as
    Windows XP x64 Edition over 5 years ago, Microsoft chose to have it install
    64-bit applications in its Program Files folder, just like 32-bit Windows.
    Then MS created a new folder for 32-bit apps only and named it "Program
    Files (x86)"! The "x86" was to indicate that it was a 32-bit app designed
    for the x86 family of Intel CPUs (8086, 80286, etc.), which were all 32-bit
    CPUs. (Why couldn't they have kept 32-bit apps in the original folder and
    created a new one named Program Files (x64)?)

    Is VS a 32-bit-only app? Or does it come in both 32-bit and 64-bit flavors?
    If VS comes in 64-bit, then you can install it only in Win7 x64, of course,
    and you might as well let it install into x64's Program Files, since you
    can't run it from 32-bit Win7, anyhow. If it is 32-bit only, then you MIGHT
    be able to install it in 32-bit Win7's Program Files folder and then force
    64-bit Win7 to execute it from that folder - but I've never done this or
    tried very hard to do it.

    Or, do as I do with Quicken and install 32-bit VS into a "neutral" location
    that can be accessed from both versions of Win7. For example, if you've
    installed Win7 x64 into your Partition 2 and Win7 x86 into Partition 3, then
    install 32-bit VS into Partition 5. (I'm using Partition numbers because
    "drive" letters can vary, depending on which OS is running, but Partition
    numbers stay the same no matter which OS is currently in charge.) Boot into
    Win7 x86 on Partition 3 and install VS on Partition 5; this will let VS
    Setup write what it needs into the Win7 x86 Registry. Then reboot into Win7
    x64 on Partition 2 and install VS AGAIN. Install it into Partition 5 again,
    so that VS Setup can make its entries into the Win7 x64 Registry. The two
    Registries will be different, but both will use the same copies of the .exe
    and other program files. Make sure that any VS data goes into the same
    location(s), no matter which OS is in charge at the time.

    As I said, I know nothing of VS, but this arrangement has worked for me for
    Quicken and the 32-bit-only versions of Word, Excel, etc., for several years
    through several incarnations of 64-bit Windows.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64)

    "Larry Lindstrom" <> wrote in message
    news:htgme4$pc$-september.org...
    > Hi Folks:
    >
    > I'm an independent software developer, still using 32 bit XP Pro. A
    > client just moved from Vista to 32 bit Windows 7. Other clients will be
    > moving to Windows 7 and I'd like to be able to test my builds for each.
    >
    > I'm getting Win 7 Ultimate retail full. Can both 64 and 32 bit
    > versions be installed on different partitions or drives of the same PC
    > with one key?
    >
    > If it is legal to have both operating systems installed at the same
    > time, is there a method to to setup Visual Studio 2008 Pro so one install
    > is accessible to both versions of Windows 7? This means, among other
    > things, setting up each OS's registry.
    >
    > It won't be a tragedy to install VS 2008 on the 64 bit Windows 7 as
    > long as I can select 32 or 64 bit builds.
    >
    > I'm a first timer to this group, so I perused some of the threads
    > before posting from Google Groubs, but that seems to offend at least
    > somebody. Why is XS11E killing all posts from Google Groups?
    >
    > Sorry to hear that Microsoft is dropping support for this and other
    > newsgroups. I also prefer this format to forums.
    >
    > Perhaps it's time to think about other platforms.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Larry
     
    R. C. White, May 25, 2010
    #6
  7. Larry Lindstrom

    Doug Forster Guest

    Hi Larry,

    Everyone else has covered your legal question, but actually you don't
    need to install both OS's just for VS. VS is a 32 bit app but that makes
    no difference. It will build for whatever target bitness you want
    regardless of which OS it is running on. The only issue really is
    testing your builds on various OS's. If you really want to do
    comprehensive testing you might be best to get MSDN. This has a per
    person licence and you can install OS's to your hearts content on as
    many machines/ virtual machines / partitions you want so long as you are
    the only user and it is for dev and testing purposes.
    I use VS2008 on both Win 7 64 bit and Vista 64 bit for developing 32 bit
    apps and both environments work just fine.

    Cheers
    Doug Forster
     
    Doug Forster, May 25, 2010
    #7
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