Is it all worth it?

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmU=?=, Oct 18, 2005.

  1. Ive got to get a new PC built.

    Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    whats not,

    all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new drivers
    etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the drivers
    are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?

    Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not sure
    what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull of
    programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe PDF
    reader,and a few other programmes.

    Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im finding
    it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    manufacturers websites dont give much away!!

    Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated

    Steve
     
    =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmU=?=, Oct 18, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. In my opinion windows xp 64 is much faster, even starting up and doing simple
    taks such as copying files. Also almost every program I used before works.

    The only problem is drivers, it took me some time but I have found all the
    drivers except for my TV card (It seems there are no TV card drivers, but
    apparently pinnacle are bringing them out in a few months).

    My advice, look for drivers before you get windows 64, if you can find them
    all (like printers), then its worth upgrading, otherwise wait till the
    drivers come out.

    Owen
     
    =?Utf-8?B?T3dlbg==?=, Oct 18, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. It's really about whether you have the drivers for your equipment. If your
    environment has printers that are supported, and no software stoppers, I
    personally think it's a good move. None of the programs you list is likely
    to be an issue. But what are the printers in your environment? Are there
    native drivers for them? If not, are there reasonable substitutes for what
    you need to do? Does your work require a scanner? (and if it does, do you
    need to run it on your computer, or is there a dedicated scanning station?)

    I personally find it somewhat faster, and somewhat more stable. OTOH,
    wireless support is less solid, IMHO, even though it does generally work.
    (But connecting to an Exchange server over wireless is annoying.)


    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64

    Steve wrote:
    > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    >
    > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > whats not,
    >
    > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > drivers etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe
    > the drivers are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    >
    > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > sure what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a
    > handfull of programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office
    > 2003, Adobe PDF reader,and a few other programmes.
    >
    > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > finding it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available
    > which will enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and
    > the manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    >
    > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    >
    > Steve
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Oct 18, 2005
    #3
  4. Hi
    Ive been searching for drivers, two of the printers have 'workaround'
    drivers, so these printers wont be a problem, im awaiting a reply from epson
    for my stylus color 980 (they have drivers for the 900 but dont state the
    980!)

    The other printer i have to search for drivers for is a brother HL1260e
    laser printer which quite old (about 5years )will be used via a network,
    which is my other concern! ive posted a question in the network section
    weather or not ill get problems using a wired network (through router) to the
    other pc which is running win xp 32bit & of course using the laser printer.

    I think once i can sort these minor difficulties ill go for the full 64 bit
    system, as i think its the only way to go unless like you say i have major
    software/hardware driver difficulties which i dont think i have.

    Thanks for the advice, much apreciated

    Steve

    "Charlie Russel - MVP" wrote:

    > It's really about whether you have the drivers for your equipment. If your
    > environment has printers that are supported, and no software stoppers, I
    > personally think it's a good move. None of the programs you list is likely
    > to be an issue. But what are the printers in your environment? Are there
    > native drivers for them? If not, are there reasonable substitutes for what
    > you need to do? Does your work require a scanner? (and if it does, do you
    > need to run it on your computer, or is there a dedicated scanning station?)
    >
    > I personally find it somewhat faster, and somewhat more stable. OTOH,
    > wireless support is less solid, IMHO, even though it does generally work.
    > (But connecting to an Exchange server over wireless is annoying.)
    >
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >
    > Steve wrote:
    > > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    > >
    > > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > > whats not,
    > >
    > > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > > drivers etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe
    > > the drivers are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    > >
    > > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > > sure what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a
    > > handfull of programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office
    > > 2003, Adobe PDF reader,and a few other programmes.
    > >
    > > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > > finding it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available
    > > which will enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and
    > > the manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    > >
    > > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    > >
    > > Steve

    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmU=?=, Oct 18, 2005
    #4
  5. In answer to your question "Is it all worth it?"
    I think you have to answer that question for yourself
    primarily, and allow the industry to go its own way.

    For example, one real benefit is the ability to address
    much larger amounts of RAM: but, if one is entirely
    satisfied with 1GB of DDR400/PC3200, for example, there
    is no real benefit to Win64.

    As a former systems programmer, I can tell you that
    the problems that arise from switching from 32- to 64-bit
    logic are not trivial, and the bugs that result can be very
    difficult to find.

    I remember one parallel incident, when we were programming
    a multi-key database system: a software library routine was not
    correctly documented, and the CALL we were making to it
    passed back an address for a vector that was too large
    for calling program. Since we had trashed memory
    at the upper end of that vector, we trashed the program
    at run-time, BUT that bug was very difficult to diagnose.

    Thus, if a 64-bit integer over-writes two 32-bit addresses,
    the upper 32 bits are effectively "trashed", as far as
    as the two consecutive 32-bit addresses are concerned.

    write this:
    0101010101010101010101010101010111111111111111111111111111111111
    on top of this:
    01010101010101010101010101010101

    This kind of thing can happy very easily during
    SUBROUTINE calls, and parameter passing.

    The reverse can be equally problematic:

    write this:
    00000000000000000000000000000101
    on top of this:
    0000000000000000000000000000010100000000000000000000000000000000

    5 (or 4 + 1, in binary) just got RATHER HUGE!! :)

    I would like to see Microsoft engineer a single
    version of XP/Pro, which works on both
    32- and 64-bit CPUs. Since 32-bit machine code
    will run on 64-bit CPUs, the obvious challenge is to get
    a 64-bit version of XP/Pro to run on 32-bit machines
    (do NOT forget the ENORMOUS INSTALLED BASE
    of existing 32-bit hardware!)

    However, correct me if I am wrong about this,
    but the latter is not a current objective of
    Microsoft Corporation.


    Sincerely yours,
    /s/ Paul Andrew Mitchell
    Webmaster, Supreme Law Library


    "Steve" wrote:

    > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    >
    > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > whats not,
    >
    > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new drivers
    > etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the drivers
    > are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    >
    > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not sure
    > what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull of
    > programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe PDF
    > reader,and a few other programmes.
    >
    > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im finding
    > it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    >
    > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    >
    > Steve
     
    =?Utf-8?B?U3VwcmVtZUxhdw==?=, Oct 18, 2005
    #5
  6. Let's face it, the AMD64 is a brilliant processor - pure genius, in fact! If
    you get one, you would certainly want a 64bit OS, I cannot think of anyone
    who would put 32bit XP on that, and be totally satisfied, even considering
    that the chip is still brilliant. This chip begs for a supporting OS!

    There have been almost total confusion in the press about this. Ask ten
    people; read ten reports, and you sit with 12 disagreeing views at the very
    least. A lot of knowledgeable people will bring forward the issues that are
    most important to them, like memory - and say, that if this is not a 'big
    one' for you, you might as well wait. I do not agree, even though they are
    correct within the framework of their own computer related universe. That is
    pure logic - if you must run terrabytes of memory, it is certainly nice to
    have an OS that can handle it, it might even appear as the 'most important'
    issue.

    Quite as brilliant as the chip, is the OS. This is the beauty of it all -
    they are such a handsom couple! Everything is visibly better, unless it
    won't install or run at all. Those are the rules of the game.
    Flightsimulator, as an example - I have set every option at a 100% and it
    sports FPS at a rate of 45 inside clouds, over airports and cities with
    detailed scenery. I mean, I am no FS freak, and I am no FPS freak either,
    but just to see this, makes it worth it. I have 1gig of RAM installed, if I
    stumble on a box full of money, I might get another, but I will not need it
    and that side of the OS's capabilities I can totally ignore. But having seen
    this, I could not have another computer without this - or something even
    better. As I said, everything else is pretty much the same, save that which
    will not do anything at all. I bet you can live with that, as I can. It's a
    shame, but I can wait. Vista will be out before my devotion crumbles!

    As a bonus, you have not built or bought your system yet, if I understand
    you correctly. This, gives you the opportunity to tailor you system to the
    hardware that is supported, in stead of the opposit, which makes it
    difficult for so many, hence some of the warnings, I assume. I'd say, "Go
    ahead!", but tread carefully.

    Tony. . .


    "Steve" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    >
    > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > whats not,
    >
    > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > drivers
    > etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    > drivers
    > are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    >
    > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > sure
    > what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull
    > of
    > programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe
    > PDF
    > reader,and a few other programmes.
    >
    > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > finding
    > it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    >
    > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    >
    > Steve
     
    Tony Sperling, Oct 18, 2005
    #6
  7. =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmU=?=

    Default User Guest

    You can run XP x86 just fine on a 64-bit computer. Without knowing what
    programs and peripherals you plan to use, no one can say with any certainty
    that you should buy the machine with XP Pro x64. You will need to review
    manufacturers' websites and this newsgroup for that. Some multiboot XP and
    XP64 in order to continue to access peripherals and programs not compatible
    with XP64. I maintain two different computers. Keep in mind that you will
    need to buy XP64 with the computer whether or not you are going to use it
    now because XP64 is not available in retail outlets. There is no boxed
    edition, only an OEM edition meant to be sold with new computers.

    For a good list of drivers for XP64 and a lot of other compatibility info, I
    suggest http://www.planetamd64.com/

    "Steve" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    >
    > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > whats not,
    >
    > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > drivers
    > etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    > drivers
    > are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    >
    > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > sure
    > what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull
    > of
    > programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe
    > PDF
    > reader,and a few other programmes.
    >
    > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > finding
    > it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    >
    > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    >
    > Steve
     
    Default User, Oct 18, 2005
    #7
  8. =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmU=?=

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Steve.

    When I needed a new mobo in July 2004, I bought a 64-bit EPoX 8KDA3+ with
    AMD Athlon 64 3200+ CPU, even though 64-bit Windows was not yet available
    for it. I ran 32-bit WinXP Pro on it then - and still do - that's what I'm
    using right now. When WinXP x64 became available in June 2005, I installed
    it to dual-boot. Then when Windows Vista Beta 1 became available, I added
    both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions and I'm now quad-booting. Except for
    the normal bugs in Beta and a couple of other gotchas in WinXP x64, I've
    been very happy with my decision to choose 64-bit hardware. If I were to
    need a new mobo today, the decision would be even more clear-cut: 64-bit
    all the way! ;<)

    Watch out for one little terminology nit. It's NOT XP64. That name was
    used a couple of years ago when Microsoft wrote the first 64-bit Windows to
    run on Intel's Itanium CPU. I never tried that version, so I can't say much
    about it, although I have seen it discussed in the Windows XP Professional
    Resource Kit and other places. When this new 64-bit version was written for
    the AMD 64 chips, Microsoft dubbed it the x64 version. Yeah, I know XP64
    sounds more natural, and in time that may become the common nickname, but
    for now, you'll be inviting confusion with the Itanium version (which has
    now been discontinued) if you use that moniker.

    To distinguish x64 from the 32-bit version of WinXP, MS started calling the
    older version "x86", referring to the long line of Intel chips, from the
    8086 to 80486 (before they switched to Pentium, rather than 80586). Another
    thing to watch out for is that WinXP x64 creates both a "\Program Files"
    folder AND a "\Program Files (x86)" folder. The idea is that the new (x86)
    folder will hold the old 32-bit programs during the transitional period
    until we have all 64-bit versions of the programs.

    ALL my 32-bit programs work fine in WinXP x64. The only program I lost was
    my 1991-vintage WordPerfect Office Library Calendar, which is a 16-bit
    MS-DOS program; it runs in x86's "DOS" window, but not in x64's. I miss it
    a lot, but I guess it's time to move on. Office 2003, Adobe Reader,
    Quicken, and a long list of other programs work as well or better in x64
    than in WinXP x86. A few drivers are still not ready. My HP OfficeJet G55
    works fine for my needs, including scanning, but it took HP two years to
    produce the full-featured drivers for Win2K for it, so I don't expect them
    anytime soon (if ever) for x64 or Vista. I watch TV on my computer in WinXP
    x86; ATI has produced graphics drivers that work fine in x64 and Vista, but
    their MMC (Multimedia Center) program does not yet work for TV for me in
    those systems. (Other users report mixed success.) Microsoft has not yet
    produced x64 drivers for some of their own branded hardware, including my
    new Microsoft mouse; it works, but without some of the Intellimouse
    features. And one of the most annoying problems is that the spell checker
    does not work in Outlook Express 6, even with Microsoft Office installed.

    All in all, it's a mixed bag, but there are enough plusses that I wouldn't
    voluntarily go back to 32-bit.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP

    "Steve" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    >
    > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > whats not,
    >
    > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > drivers
    > etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    > drivers
    > are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    >
    > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > sure
    > what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull
    > of
    > programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe
    > PDF
    > reader,and a few other programmes.
    >
    > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > finding
    > it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    >
    > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    >
    > Steve
     
    R. C. White, Oct 18, 2005
    #8
  9. Great discussion, folks!

    I really do agree with the comments about the
    superiority of the Athlon 64, even though I have
    never owned or even operated one. If you trace
    the history of its development, I am told that
    it was conceived and engineered by the former gurus
    who persuaded Microsoft to develop NT and NTFS.

    And, those same personnel trace their experience
    back to Digital Equipment's famous VAX 11/780
    super minicomputer. That was SOME hardware
    and an AMAZING operating system too (VMS, as I recall).

    Embedding the memory controller on the CPU chip
    also helps exploit low-latency RAM products,
    like those now being offered by Corsair, OCZ,
    Crucial, Kingston & such. Tom's Hardware reports
    that low-latency DDR memory does not make
    that much of a difference on Intel's CPU's,
    because the Northbridge intervenes. We confirmed
    this after we built a Prescott 3.2 GHz machine
    with Corsair XMS DDR400 running 2-2-2-5.

    GET THIS:
    Our Corsair DDR400 "Value RAM" is just a hair slower
    on another machine which runs a 2.8 GHz HT P4
    with default SPD settings. Go figure!

    MUST BE THE ON-CHIP MEMORY CONTROLLER!!


    To save me having to look it up, can anyone answer
    this question quickly?

    I recall that Windows XP came with a program which
    one could run on a Windows 98 system, to determine
    which Win98 software & hardware would still work under XP,
    and which ones would not. What was that program called,
    please?

    Is there a comparable program for the 64-bit version
    of Windows XP/Pro?

    It occurs to me that a LOT of questions could be
    handled QUICKLY, if Microsoft would create a database
    of drivers that currently support 64-bit mode:

    Then, the plug-and-play subsystem could quickly determine
    if any given peripheral device will operate with the driver
    that is bundled with Windows x64.

    THIS IS A PURR-FECT APPLICATION FOR PLUG-AND-PLAY,
    EXTENDED LOGICALLY TO THE 64-BIT WORLD, WHICH HAS ARRIVED!!

    To give a very current example, which came up this week,
    if one is using a Promise PCI/RAID controller, this program could
    check its database and tell you if a driver is bundled with
    Windows x64 for that particular device. I wouldn't mind
    one bit if the program required Internet access, in order
    to confirm the VERY LATEST driver database records.

    If such a program already exists, would someone please
    point me to it, to save me the time required to search for it?

    If you will recall, one could run this program under Windows 95 or 98,
    without making ANY changes whatsoever: it was merely a
    diagnostic which produced a detailed report of its findings,
    with excellent recommendations.

    WAY COOL, THAT!!

    Many thanks, in advance.


    Sincerely yours,
    /s/ Paul Andrew Mitchell
    Webmaster, Supreme Law Library


    "R. C. White" wrote:

    > Hi, Steve.
    >
    > When I needed a new mobo in July 2004, I bought a 64-bit EPoX 8KDA3+ with
    > AMD Athlon 64 3200+ CPU, even though 64-bit Windows was not yet available
    > for it. I ran 32-bit WinXP Pro on it then - and still do - that's what I'm
    > using right now. When WinXP x64 became available in June 2005, I installed
    > it to dual-boot. Then when Windows Vista Beta 1 became available, I added
    > both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions and I'm now quad-booting. Except for
    > the normal bugs in Beta and a couple of other gotchas in WinXP x64, I've
    > been very happy with my decision to choose 64-bit hardware. If I were to
    > need a new mobo today, the decision would be even more clear-cut: 64-bit
    > all the way! ;<)
    >
    > Watch out for one little terminology nit. It's NOT XP64. That name was
    > used a couple of years ago when Microsoft wrote the first 64-bit Windows to
    > run on Intel's Itanium CPU. I never tried that version, so I can't say much
    > about it, although I have seen it discussed in the Windows XP Professional
    > Resource Kit and other places. When this new 64-bit version was written for
    > the AMD 64 chips, Microsoft dubbed it the x64 version. Yeah, I know XP64
    > sounds more natural, and in time that may become the common nickname, but
    > for now, you'll be inviting confusion with the Itanium version (which has
    > now been discontinued) if you use that moniker.
    >
    > To distinguish x64 from the 32-bit version of WinXP, MS started calling the
    > older version "x86", referring to the long line of Intel chips, from the
    > 8086 to 80486 (before they switched to Pentium, rather than 80586). Another
    > thing to watch out for is that WinXP x64 creates both a "\Program Files"
    > folder AND a "\Program Files (x86)" folder. The idea is that the new (x86)
    > folder will hold the old 32-bit programs during the transitional period
    > until we have all 64-bit versions of the programs.
    >
    > ALL my 32-bit programs work fine in WinXP x64. The only program I lost was
    > my 1991-vintage WordPerfect Office Library Calendar, which is a 16-bit
    > MS-DOS program; it runs in x86's "DOS" window, but not in x64's. I miss it
    > a lot, but I guess it's time to move on. Office 2003, Adobe Reader,
    > Quicken, and a long list of other programs work as well or better in x64
    > than in WinXP x86. A few drivers are still not ready. My HP OfficeJet G55
    > works fine for my needs, including scanning, but it took HP two years to
    > produce the full-featured drivers for Win2K for it, so I don't expect them
    > anytime soon (if ever) for x64 or Vista. I watch TV on my computer in WinXP
    > x86; ATI has produced graphics drivers that work fine in x64 and Vista, but
    > their MMC (Multimedia Center) program does not yet work for TV for me in
    > those systems. (Other users report mixed success.) Microsoft has not yet
    > produced x64 drivers for some of their own branded hardware, including my
    > new Microsoft mouse; it works, but without some of the Intellimouse
    > features. And one of the most annoying problems is that the spell checker
    > does not work in Outlook Express 6, even with Microsoft Office installed.
    >
    > All in all, it's a mixed bag, but there are enough plusses that I wouldn't
    > voluntarily go back to 32-bit.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    >
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    >
    > "Steve" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    > >
    > > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > > whats not,
    > >
    > > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > > drivers
    > > etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    > > drivers
    > > are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    > >
    > > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > > sure
    > > what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull
    > > of
    > > programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe
    > > PDF
    > > reader,and a few other programmes.
    > >
    > > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > > finding
    > > it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > > enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > > manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    > >
    > > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    > >
    > > Steve

    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?U3VwcmVtZUxhdw==?=, Oct 19, 2005
    #9
  10. "Steve" wrote:

    > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated


    As others have suggested "it depends" is probably the best answer.

    If you already have a 32bit Windows OS license then sure, go ahead and get
    XP x64 and install it to dual boot with your existing 32bit Windows so that
    you'll still have access any hardware that doesn't have 32bit drivers (and
    there's plenty that doesn't).

    If you want/need to be in 64bit all the time then chose your hardware
    carefully to make sure there are 64bit drivers. Don't hold your breath
    waiting for older hardware to have 64bit drivers created as most
    manufacturers will only provider drivers for newer hardware that is still
    being sold.
     
    =?Utf-8?B?YmVhbmphbW1pbg==?=, Oct 19, 2005
    #10
  11. FOUND IT! It was called the "Program Compatibility Wizard":

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/helpandsupport/compat/default.mspx

    Here's what my original Windows XP Home Edition documentation
    said about it:

    [begin excerpt]

    Will all of my software and hardware work on Windows XP?

    You can check the compatibility of your hardware and software
    before you install it:

    * Click Start > Help and Support > Find compatible hardware and
    software for Windows XP (under "Pick a task").

    * Click Start > Help and Support and type "Program Compatibility Wizard"
    in the Search box.

    * Visit the Microsoft Compatibility Web site at:

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/upgrade/compatible/

    [end excerpt]


    That's THE solution, imho: MS should update this Wizard and
    make it a FREE DOWNLOAD at the Microsoft website,
    for anyone who wants to begin planning their transition
    to Windows x64.

    Hey, folks! What are computers for? (What's a META for?? :)


    Sincerely yours,
    /s/ Paul Andrew Mitchell
    Webmaster, Supreme Law Library



    "SupremeLaw" wrote:

    > Great discussion, folks!
    >
    > I really do agree with the comments about the
    > superiority of the Athlon 64, even though I have
    > never owned or even operated one. If you trace
    > the history of its development, I am told that
    > it was conceived and engineered by the former gurus
    > who persuaded Microsoft to develop NT and NTFS.
    >
    > And, those same personnel trace their experience
    > back to Digital Equipment's famous VAX 11/780
    > super minicomputer. That was SOME hardware
    > and an AMAZING operating system too (VMS, as I recall).
    >
    > Embedding the memory controller on the CPU chip
    > also helps exploit low-latency RAM products,
    > like those now being offered by Corsair, OCZ,
    > Crucial, Kingston & such. Tom's Hardware reports
    > that low-latency DDR memory does not make
    > that much of a difference on Intel's CPU's,
    > because the Northbridge intervenes. We confirmed
    > this after we built a Prescott 3.2 GHz machine
    > with Corsair XMS DDR400 running 2-2-2-5.
    >
    > GET THIS:
    > Our Corsair DDR400 "Value RAM" is just a hair slower
    > on another machine which runs a 2.8 GHz HT P4
    > with default SPD settings. Go figure!
    >
    > MUST BE THE ON-CHIP MEMORY CONTROLLER!!
    >
    >
    > To save me having to look it up, can anyone answer
    > this question quickly?
    >
    > I recall that Windows XP came with a program which
    > one could run on a Windows 98 system, to determine
    > which Win98 software & hardware would still work under XP,
    > and which ones would not. What was that program called,
    > please?
    >
    > Is there a comparable program for the 64-bit version
    > of Windows XP/Pro?
    >
    > It occurs to me that a LOT of questions could be
    > handled QUICKLY, if Microsoft would create a database
    > of drivers that currently support 64-bit mode:
    >
    > Then, the plug-and-play subsystem could quickly determine
    > if any given peripheral device will operate with the driver
    > that is bundled with Windows x64.
    >
    > THIS IS A PURR-FECT APPLICATION FOR PLUG-AND-PLAY,
    > EXTENDED LOGICALLY TO THE 64-BIT WORLD, WHICH HAS ARRIVED!!
    >
    > To give a very current example, which came up this week,
    > if one is using a Promise PCI/RAID controller, this program could
    > check its database and tell you if a driver is bundled with
    > Windows x64 for that particular device. I wouldn't mind
    > one bit if the program required Internet access, in order
    > to confirm the VERY LATEST driver database records.
    >
    > If such a program already exists, would someone please
    > point me to it, to save me the time required to search for it?
    >
    > If you will recall, one could run this program under Windows 95 or 98,
    > without making ANY changes whatsoever: it was merely a
    > diagnostic which produced a detailed report of its findings,
    > with excellent recommendations.
    >
    > WAY COOL, THAT!!
    >
    > Many thanks, in advance.
    >
    >
    > Sincerely yours,
    > /s/ Paul Andrew Mitchell
    > Webmaster, Supreme Law Library
    >
    >
    > "R. C. White" wrote:
    >
    > > Hi, Steve.
    > >
    > > When I needed a new mobo in July 2004, I bought a 64-bit EPoX 8KDA3+ with
    > > AMD Athlon 64 3200+ CPU, even though 64-bit Windows was not yet available
    > > for it. I ran 32-bit WinXP Pro on it then - and still do - that's what I'm
    > > using right now. When WinXP x64 became available in June 2005, I installed
    > > it to dual-boot. Then when Windows Vista Beta 1 became available, I added
    > > both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions and I'm now quad-booting. Except for
    > > the normal bugs in Beta and a couple of other gotchas in WinXP x64, I've
    > > been very happy with my decision to choose 64-bit hardware. If I were to
    > > need a new mobo today, the decision would be even more clear-cut: 64-bit
    > > all the way! ;<)
    > >
    > > Watch out for one little terminology nit. It's NOT XP64. That name was
    > > used a couple of years ago when Microsoft wrote the first 64-bit Windows to
    > > run on Intel's Itanium CPU. I never tried that version, so I can't say much
    > > about it, although I have seen it discussed in the Windows XP Professional
    > > Resource Kit and other places. When this new 64-bit version was written for
    > > the AMD 64 chips, Microsoft dubbed it the x64 version. Yeah, I know XP64
    > > sounds more natural, and in time that may become the common nickname, but
    > > for now, you'll be inviting confusion with the Itanium version (which has
    > > now been discontinued) if you use that moniker.
    > >
    > > To distinguish x64 from the 32-bit version of WinXP, MS started calling the
    > > older version "x86", referring to the long line of Intel chips, from the
    > > 8086 to 80486 (before they switched to Pentium, rather than 80586). Another
    > > thing to watch out for is that WinXP x64 creates both a "\Program Files"
    > > folder AND a "\Program Files (x86)" folder. The idea is that the new (x86)
    > > folder will hold the old 32-bit programs during the transitional period
    > > until we have all 64-bit versions of the programs.
    > >
    > > ALL my 32-bit programs work fine in WinXP x64. The only program I lost was
    > > my 1991-vintage WordPerfect Office Library Calendar, which is a 16-bit
    > > MS-DOS program; it runs in x86's "DOS" window, but not in x64's. I miss it
    > > a lot, but I guess it's time to move on. Office 2003, Adobe Reader,
    > > Quicken, and a long list of other programs work as well or better in x64
    > > than in WinXP x86. A few drivers are still not ready. My HP OfficeJet G55
    > > works fine for my needs, including scanning, but it took HP two years to
    > > produce the full-featured drivers for Win2K for it, so I don't expect them
    > > anytime soon (if ever) for x64 or Vista. I watch TV on my computer in WinXP
    > > x86; ATI has produced graphics drivers that work fine in x64 and Vista, but
    > > their MMC (Multimedia Center) program does not yet work for TV for me in
    > > those systems. (Other users report mixed success.) Microsoft has not yet
    > > produced x64 drivers for some of their own branded hardware, including my
    > > new Microsoft mouse; it works, but without some of the Intellimouse
    > > features. And one of the most annoying problems is that the spell checker
    > > does not work in Outlook Express 6, even with Microsoft Office installed.
    > >
    > > All in all, it's a mixed bag, but there are enough plusses that I wouldn't
    > > voluntarily go back to 32-bit.
    > >
    > > RC
    > > --
    > > R. C. White, CPA
    > > San Marcos, TX
    > >
    > > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > >
    > > "Steve" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    > > >
    > > > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > > > whats not,
    > > >
    > > > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > > > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > > > drivers
    > > > etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    > > > drivers
    > > > are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    > > >
    > > > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > > > sure
    > > > what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull
    > > > of
    > > > programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe
    > > > PDF
    > > > reader,and a few other programmes.
    > > >
    > > > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > > > finding
    > > > it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > > > enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > > > manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    > > >
    > > > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    > > >
    > > > Steve

    > >
    > >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?U3VwcmVtZUxhdw==?=, Oct 19, 2005
    #11
  12. Yes it is. consider >>>>dual core>>>>vista >>>>winfs and so on, it will be
    required, things in the tech world are driven by advancement. Advance.
    Consider your position and total cost of ownership for your enterprise. For
    you timimg will be everything but if you must make a purchase now go for it.
    do the dual boot to preserve your present structure migrate when you can at
    the most efficent time, while you continue to learn and hardware & drivers
    are produced / updated. Hardware my not be your only issue choose your OS for
    the quickest and most reliable advances for your requirements. I am on
    windows XP Pro 64bit and got the BSOD 3 times in the first three days (gee I
    missed them) but here i am a week later
    giving advise. I thought Win xp pro (x86) was going to make me a passive user!
    I was watching a web cast on the WINFS that blew me away, what stuck in my
    mind was one of the guys said " if i do my job right, when my three year old
    son is a teenager he should not even be aware that winfs is there and thats
    the way we are aproaching this...." That restored my faith in whats to come
    so I got a dell precision 380 3.4ghz HT 64bit with an intel 955 chipset 1gig
    ecc ram ATI fireGL v3100 video sound on mobo broadcom gigabit nic. Wal-mart
    speaker set LG flatron L1751s monitor. But... now theres no printer, webcam,
    scanner, fax,and Age of Empires 2 just will not function without DirectDraw
    no longer utilized in 64bit ....but hey I've had AoE 3 on pre order for 6
    weeks now the future is already brighter as the demo plays like toooo sweet
    and this unit is now as solid as bed rock!! Have fun with your new 64bit unit
    !!

    The first sign of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and
    expecting different results


    "Steve" wrote:

    > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    >
    > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > whats not,
    >
    > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new drivers
    > etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the drivers
    > are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    >
    > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not sure
    > what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull of
    > programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe PDF
    > reader,and a few other programmes.
    >
    > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im finding
    > it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    >
    > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    >
    > Steve
     
    =?Utf-8?B?bWlraWp1cQ==?=, Oct 19, 2005
    #12
  13. =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmU=?=

    rbd Guest

    It is important that you not only look for 64-bit drivers for your printers,
    scanners, and other hardware devices - but also be sure that you can obtain
    64-bit versions of "software" printers, such as the software used to
    "print-to" .pdf files and .max (PaperPort) files.

    While I can't prove it, it seems that a couple of my WINXP Pro X64
    configurations exhibited intermitttent shutdown problems after the failed
    installation of a couple of 32-bit drivers for .pdf and .max printing.

    Also, some of the Epson photo printer drivers built into WINXP Pro X64 may
    not be full-featured and don't appear to support all the paper options that
    the 32-bit Epson OEM drivers support.

    Unless you really need to run a 64-bit app it is probably not worth the
    effort to run WINXP Pro X64 at this time.

    rb

    Some

    "Steve" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    >
    > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > whats not,
    >
    > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > drivers
    > etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    > drivers
    > are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    >
    > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > sure
    > what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull
    > of
    > programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe
    > PDF
    > reader,and a few other programmes.
    >
    > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > finding
    > it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    >
    > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    >
    > Steve
     
    rbd, Oct 19, 2005
    #13
  14. =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmU=?=

    John Barnes Guest

    I had the same problem with Paperport, but at least they have a removal tool
    available on their site. This is one of the reasons that I don't switch to
    x64 full time, since I do a lot of purchasing, paying and receiving bills
    online, and it is so convenient with Paperport and such a hassle without it.
    Hopefully when there are 'real' users of 64-bit systems and not just those
    few in the business and early adopters, there will at least be an effort to
    supply 64-bit compatible software. So far, for me, when I receive a reply
    it is 'too few users to warrant the effort involved'

    "rbd" <> wrote in message
    news:%23B%...
    >
    > It is important that you not only look for 64-bit drivers for your
    > printers, scanners, and other hardware devices - but also be sure that
    > you can obtain 64-bit versions of "software" printers, such as the
    > software used to "print-to" .pdf files and .max (PaperPort) files.
    >
    > While I can't prove it, it seems that a couple of my WINXP Pro X64
    > configurations exhibited intermitttent shutdown problems after the failed
    > installation of a couple of 32-bit drivers for .pdf and .max printing.
    >
    > Also, some of the Epson photo printer drivers built into WINXP Pro X64 may
    > not be full-featured and don't appear to support all the paper options
    > that the 32-bit Epson OEM drivers support.
    >
    > Unless you really need to run a 64-bit app it is probably not worth the
    > effort to run WINXP Pro X64 at this time.
    >
    > rb
    >
    > Some
    >
    > "Steve" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Ive got to get a new PC built.
    >>
    >> Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good
    >> &
    >> whats not,
    >>
    >> all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    >> processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    >> drivers
    >> etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    >> drivers
    >> are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    >>
    >> Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    >> sure
    >> what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a
    >> handfull of
    >> programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe
    >> PDF
    >> reader,and a few other programmes.
    >>
    >> Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    >> finding
    >> it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    >> enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    >> manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    >>
    >> Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    >>
    >> Steve

    >
    >
     
    John Barnes, Oct 19, 2005
    #14
  15. Thanks to everyone who replied, too many names too list!! (sounds like the
    beginning of an acceptance speech!!)

    Its been excellent information from everybody who posted, I think now my
    mind is made up to go with the x64 o/s with dual boot as reccomended by most
    of you, ive worked out all the drivers i need are compatible with only a
    couple with 'workaround' drivers but i dont think this will ba a problem for
    me.

    Well, i thank you all so much for the invaluable information, and hope
    someone else makes the decision from reading this post

    Regards

    Steve

    "John Barnes" wrote:

    > I had the same problem with Paperport, but at least they have a removal tool
    > available on their site. This is one of the reasons that I don't switch to
    > x64 full time, since I do a lot of purchasing, paying and receiving bills
    > online, and it is so convenient with Paperport and such a hassle without it.
    > Hopefully when there are 'real' users of 64-bit systems and not just those
    > few in the business and early adopters, there will at least be an effort to
    > supply 64-bit compatible software. So far, for me, when I receive a reply
    > it is 'too few users to warrant the effort involved'
    >
    > "rbd" <> wrote in message
    > news:%23B%...
    > >
    > > It is important that you not only look for 64-bit drivers for your
    > > printers, scanners, and other hardware devices - but also be sure that
    > > you can obtain 64-bit versions of "software" printers, such as the
    > > software used to "print-to" .pdf files and .max (PaperPort) files.
    > >
    > > While I can't prove it, it seems that a couple of my WINXP Pro X64
    > > configurations exhibited intermitttent shutdown problems after the failed
    > > installation of a couple of 32-bit drivers for .pdf and .max printing.
    > >
    > > Also, some of the Epson photo printer drivers built into WINXP Pro X64 may
    > > not be full-featured and don't appear to support all the paper options
    > > that the 32-bit Epson OEM drivers support.
    > >
    > > Unless you really need to run a 64-bit app it is probably not worth the
    > > effort to run WINXP Pro X64 at this time.
    > >
    > > rb
    > >
    > > Some
    > >
    > > "Steve" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> Ive got to get a new PC built.
    > >>
    > >> Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good
    > >> &
    > >> whats not,
    > >>
    > >> all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > >> processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > >> drivers
    > >> etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    > >> drivers
    > >> are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    > >>
    > >> Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > >> sure
    > >> what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a
    > >> handfull of
    > >> programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe
    > >> PDF
    > >> reader,and a few other programmes.
    > >>
    > >> Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > >> finding
    > >> it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > >> enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > >> manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    > >>
    > >> Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    > >>
    > >> Steve

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmU=?=, Oct 19, 2005
    #15
  16. Well I just tried to install WinXP and Win2000 on my new system with the 64
    bit CPU and while everything will install fine the computer will not finish
    the load into windows and instead just reboots. Here is my specs:

    Gigabyte GA-K8U
    AMD Sempron 64 2600
    512mb RAM (PC2100 - yes it is supported by the board and did swap with 512mb
    pc 3200)
    nVidia GeForce 5700
    I'm using 2 older Maxtor IDE HDs (both are ultra) for now with the intention
    of getting a SATA drive for the O/S later on.

    I was able to install both WinXP and Win2000. The problem occurs after the
    install is complete. The computer goes to load Windows. When the loading
    process is complete, it should boot into windows. Instead, the computer
    reboots. On Win2000, there is a momentary flash of a blue screen but
    dissappears as the computer reboots. So I have not had a chance to read what
    it says. I've tried everything. Swapping hard drives, swapping video cards
    (tried a Radeon 9600), swapping memory (512mb PC 3200). Same problems. I'm
    hoping I can find someone with a similar problem so I can confirm that what I
    need is a 64 bit O/S.



    "Default User" wrote:

    > You can run XP x86 just fine on a 64-bit computer. Without knowing what
    > programs and peripherals you plan to use, no one can say with any certainty
    > that you should buy the machine with XP Pro x64. You will need to review
    > manufacturers' websites and this newsgroup for that. Some multiboot XP and
    > XP64 in order to continue to access peripherals and programs not compatible
    > with XP64. I maintain two different computers. Keep in mind that you will
    > need to buy XP64 with the computer whether or not you are going to use it
    > now because XP64 is not available in retail outlets. There is no boxed
    > edition, only an OEM edition meant to be sold with new computers.
    >
    > For a good list of drivers for XP64 and a lot of other compatibility info, I
    > suggest http://www.planetamd64.com/
    >
    > "Steve" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    > >
    > > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > > whats not,
    > >
    > > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > > drivers
    > > etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    > > drivers
    > > are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    > >
    > > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > > sure
    > > what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a handfull
    > > of
    > > programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003, Adobe
    > > PDF
    > > reader,and a few other programmes.
    > >
    > > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > > finding
    > > it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    > > enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    > > manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    > >
    > > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    > >
    > > Steve

    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?RGVuaXNlTlk=?=, Oct 19, 2005
    #16
  17. Use F8 to set boot up options as your computer is first booting up. Choose
    to NOT automatically reboot on failure, and then continue booting. This will
    leave the blue screen up so you can read the error code and report it back
    here and we can point you at the solution. (Start a new thread, please!)

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64

    DeniseNY wrote:
    > Well I just tried to install WinXP and Win2000 on my new system with the
    > 64 bit CPU and while everything will install fine the computer will not
    > finish the load into windows and instead just reboots. Here is my specs:
    >
    > Gigabyte GA-K8U
    > AMD Sempron 64 2600
    > 512mb RAM (PC2100 - yes it is supported by the board and did swap with
    > 512mb pc 3200)
    > nVidia GeForce 5700
    > I'm using 2 older Maxtor IDE HDs (both are ultra) for now with the
    > intention of getting a SATA drive for the O/S later on.
    >
    > I was able to install both WinXP and Win2000. The problem occurs after
    > the install is complete. The computer goes to load Windows. When the
    > loading process is complete, it should boot into windows. Instead, the
    > computer reboots. On Win2000, there is a momentary flash of a blue
    > screen but dissappears as the computer reboots. So I have not had a
    > chance to read what it says. I've tried everything. Swapping hard
    > drives, swapping video cards (tried a Radeon 9600), swapping memory
    > (512mb PC 3200). Same problems. I'm hoping I can find someone with a
    > similar problem so I can confirm that what I need is a 64 bit O/S.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Default User" wrote:
    >
    >> You can run XP x86 just fine on a 64-bit computer. Without knowing what
    >> programs and peripherals you plan to use, no one can say with any
    >> certainty that you should buy the machine with XP Pro x64. You will
    >> need to review manufacturers' websites and this newsgroup for that.
    >> Some multiboot XP and XP64 in order to continue to access peripherals
    >> and programs not compatible with XP64. I maintain two different
    >> computers. Keep in mind that you will need to buy XP64 with the
    >> computer whether or not you are going to use it now because XP64 is not
    >> available in retail outlets. There is no boxed edition, only an OEM
    >> edition meant to be sold with new computers.
    >>
    >> For a good list of drivers for XP64 and a lot of other compatibility
    >> info, I suggest http://www.planetamd64.com/
    >>
    >> "Steve" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Ive got to get a new PC built.
    >>>
    >>> Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats
    >>> good & whats not,
    >>>
    >>> all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    >>> processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    >>> drivers
    >>> etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe the
    >>> drivers
    >>> are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    >>>
    >>> Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    >>> sure
    >>> what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a
    >>> handfull of
    >>> programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office 2003,
    >>> Adobe PDF
    >>> reader,and a few other programmes.
    >>>
    >>> Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    >>> finding
    >>> it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available which will
    >>> enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and the
    >>> manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    >>>
    >>> Steve
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Oct 19, 2005
    #17
  18. In addition to the obvious driver issues, you may run into other problems
    with Win XP x64.

    For instance - the antivirus software that came with my motherboard wouldn't
    install on Win XP x64. Free AVG antivirus was also a no-go. The copy of Nero
    that came with the DVD+/-RW also would not install on Win XP x64. "WinFlash"
    (used to update the BIOS) wouldn't start. nVidia's nTune system optimizer
    actually wrote incompatible settings to the BIOS under Win XP x64.

    In general, standard "office" applications work well but anything else may
    have trouble.

    I've been dual booting my system between 32 and 64-bit Win XP for a while
    and can feel the speed difference. However, I'm not sure if that's more to do
    with the larger registry and the increased number of drivers that the 32-bit
    version loads at start-up.
     
    =?Utf-8?B?ZWVqaXQ=?=, Oct 20, 2005
    #18
  19. Hi Steve and all

    I'm not sure we're finding it worth it. Just got a new Acer notebook with
    Win XP Pro 64 on it.

    It won't connect to the printers on our XP Pro (32 bit) / Win 2000 network -
    the workarounds provided by the manufacturers don't work over the network
    (need direct connection).

    We also use USB--->Serial adaptors extensively - and there appear to be no
    drivers available.

    Also recently tried to install Win XP 64 on a desktop - worked after we
    found (much searching in planetamd64 - great place) a 64 bit SATA driver.
    Abandoned the attempt when we could find NO driver for the wireless network
    card - so re-installed Windows XP Pro.

    My main question about Windows XP Pro 64 is, if (as appears to be the case
    on Microsofts web site) Microsoft KNEW that there would be considerable
    driver problems they didn't design the system to use / convert etc. the
    32-bit drivers?

    I feel this operating system release is premature - it's throwing us back to
    the dark ages of hunting around for drivers, abandoning most of our hardware,
    a lot of our software etc.

    I know that if I was just using the system with the provided software it'd
    be fine. But at present it's like having a powerful car and someone's
    forgotten to build the roads.

    So, come on Microsoft - a driver conversion utility would be just great!






    "Steve" wrote:

    > Hi
    > Ive been searching for drivers, two of the printers have 'workaround'
    > drivers, so these printers wont be a problem, im awaiting a reply from epson
    > for my stylus color 980 (they have drivers for the 900 but dont state the
    > 980!)
    >
    > The other printer i have to search for drivers for is a brother HL1260e
    > laser printer which quite old (about 5years )will be used via a network,
    > which is my other concern! ive posted a question in the network section
    > weather or not ill get problems using a wired network (through router) to the
    > other pc which is running win xp 32bit & of course using the laser printer.
    >
    > I think once i can sort these minor difficulties ill go for the full 64 bit
    > system, as i think its the only way to go unless like you say i have major
    > software/hardware driver difficulties which i dont think i have.
    >
    > Thanks for the advice, much apreciated
    >
    > Steve
    >
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" wrote:
    >
    > > It's really about whether you have the drivers for your equipment. If your
    > > environment has printers that are supported, and no software stoppers, I
    > > personally think it's a good move. None of the programs you list is likely
    > > to be an issue. But what are the printers in your environment? Are there
    > > native drivers for them? If not, are there reasonable substitutes for what
    > > you need to do? Does your work require a scanner? (and if it does, do you
    > > need to run it on your computer, or is there a dedicated scanning station?)
    > >
    > > I personally find it somewhat faster, and somewhat more stable. OTOH,
    > > wireless support is less solid, IMHO, even though it does generally work.
    > > (But connecting to an Exchange server over wireless is annoying.)
    > >
    > >
    > > --
    > > Charlie.
    > > http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    > >
    > > Steve wrote:
    > > > Ive got to get a new PC built.
    > > >
    > > > Ive been reading about 64 bit, but im a little confused about whats good &
    > > > whats not,
    > > >
    > > > all i need to get clear is that if for arguments sake say i had a AMD64
    > > > processor etc, will it run normal 32bit XP with no problems with new
    > > > drivers etc?, and say at a later date put windows xp 64 on it when maybe
    > > > the drivers are widley available, or should i go straight to xp 64?
    > > >
    > > > Ive read a lot of articles on the pros and cons of the 64 but still not
    > > > sure what to do, we will us the pc in a business enviroment, so only a
    > > > handfull of programmes are used, namley AutoCad LT 2004, MIcrosoft Office
    > > > 2003, Adobe PDF reader,and a few other programmes.
    > > >
    > > > Also im worried about drivers for printers connected & networked, im
    > > > finding it hard to find a list of all the drivers which are available
    > > > which will enable the hardware & software we use to work with XP 64, and
    > > > the manufacturers websites dont give much away!!
    > > >
    > > > Any suggestions help etc will be much apreciated
    > > >
    > > > Steve

    > >
    > >
    > >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?SmFtaWU=?=, Oct 26, 2005
    #19
  20. =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmU=?=

    Guest

    I have a similar problem

    New MB, processor, video card

    Gigabyte GA-K8U MB
    BIOS updated to F6 (july 2005)
    Sempron 64bit 2800+
    512meg pc2100
    chaintech video card (Volari v3)
    WD 60gig HD

    I cannot boot from hardrrive. It wants to boot from floppy or CD. I
    have been able to install WinXP Home (it's just for the kids) and the
    setup completed to the point where I can add new users etc. It was
    installed onto fresh formatted drive.

    Upon restart it will
    1 - test memmory
    2 - Detecting IDE Drives, takes a while but recognizes my HD and CDRW
    3 - Does a second Detecting IDE Drives. This seems strange. also takes
    a while (30secs)
    4 - then it will list all of the internal info and PCI device listing
    5 - Then it asks to boot from CD/DVD.
    It takes about 80 seconds from reset key to get to the end of step 5.

    Boot sequence is Floppy, Harrdrive, then CD

    Power switch works, LEDs all work, reset switch works. Extra 4-pin plug
    from power supply is plugged in.

    The only way to get the system to run is to have the XP CD in during
    boot
    Any help please

    Steve



    DeniseNY wrote:

    > I was able to install both WinXP and Win2000. The problem occurs after the
    > install is complete. The computer goes to load Windows. When the loading
    > process is complete, it should boot into windows. Instead, the computer
    > reboots. On Win2000, there is a momentary flash of a blue screen but
    > dissappears as the computer reboots. So I have not had a chance to read what
    > it says. I've tried everything. Swapping hard drives, swapping video cards
    > (tried a Radeon 9600), swapping memory (512mb PC 3200). Same problems. I'm
    > hoping I can find someone with a similar problem so I can confirm that what I
    > need is a 64 bit O/S.
    >
    >
    >
     
    , Oct 27, 2005
    #20
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