Is it a router or a computer problem?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by =?Utf-8?B?TG9yaW1hcg==?=, Apr 15, 2007.

  1. My computer keep on getting a 169 address when trying to connect wirelessly
    to a WPA-PSK and WEP enabled network. Not only is my computer but the rest
    of the wirelessly connected computers. I'm on an internal wireless, while
    two other laptops are using a NIC. When using an ethernet cable to connect
    the laptops to the router they work, so it's only a wireless problem.

    When booting from a Linux CD (Ubuntu), I can connect easliy with a WEP since
    I have an internal wireless. I kinda learning about Linux at the moment so
    I'm not fully reliant on that CD.

    I have already done a full reboot of the network system, and I'm still
    getting a 169 address on the laptop. I log into the router and it show that
    169 address on the NAT portmap (i think it is).

    I also have a friend that has a WPA-PSK enabled network I get a 169 address
    when trying to connect to his.

    I have an SMC router set on DHCP. My computer is a Dell Latitude D620 with
    an Intel Pro Wireless.

    I've run AVG Anti-Spyware on my computer and nothing came up.

    My possible conclusions are:
    1) One of the computers contracted a virus, and spread it to every other
    computer on the network.
    2) The router's messed up (maybe related to the WPA-PSK in some way).
    3) All of our computers are messed up somehow.

    Any help is greatly appreciated.
     
    =?Utf-8?B?TG9yaW1hcg==?=, Apr 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. =?Utf-8?B?TG9yaW1hcg==?=

    Lem Guest

    Lorimar wrote:
    > My computer keep on getting a 169 address when trying to connect wirelessly
    > to a WPA-PSK and WEP enabled network. Not only is my computer but the rest
    > of the wirelessly connected computers. I'm on an internal wireless, while
    > two other laptops are using a NIC. When using an ethernet cable to connect
    > the laptops to the router they work, so it's only a wireless problem.
    >
    > When booting from a Linux CD (Ubuntu), I can connect easliy with a WEP since
    > I have an internal wireless. I kinda learning about Linux at the moment so
    > I'm not fully reliant on that CD.
    >
    > I have already done a full reboot of the network system, and I'm still
    > getting a 169 address on the laptop. I log into the router and it show that
    > 169 address on the NAT portmap (i think it is).
    >
    > I also have a friend that has a WPA-PSK enabled network I get a 169 address
    > when trying to connect to his.
    >
    > I have an SMC router set on DHCP. My computer is a Dell Latitude D620 with
    > an Intel Pro Wireless.
    >
    > I've run AVG Anti-Spyware on my computer and nothing came up.
    >
    > My possible conclusions are:
    > 1) One of the computers contracted a virus, and spread it to every other
    > computer on the network.
    > 2) The router's messed up (maybe related to the WPA-PSK in some way).
    > 3) All of our computers are messed up somehow.
    >
    > Any help is greatly appreciated.
    >


    Your question does not make sense: you can't have a "WPA-PSK and WEP
    enabled network." Both WEP and WPA-PSK are encryption protocols, with
    WPA-PSK being newer and more secure than WEP. All devices on any given
    wireless network -- including the router/wireless access point and ALL
    wireless clients (computers, print servers, etc.) must use the SAME
    encryption protocol. That means you can't have some devices configured
    to use WEP and other devices configured to use WPA-PSK.

    Pick one level of encryption (the most secure level that all of your
    devices can handle) and stick with that.

    If you access your SMC router's configuration screens you should be able
    to determine whether the router is configured to use WEP or WPA-PSK.
    You will also be able to determine the encryption key or passphrase set
    in the router.

    Once you know those two pieces of information from your router, you can
    configure the internal wireless adapter in your laptop (or the external
    wireless adapters used on the other two laptops.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
     
    Lem, Apr 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. =?Utf-8?B?TG9yaW1hcg==?=

    Guest

    On 15-Apr-2007, =?Utf-8?B?TG9yaW1hcg==?= <> wrote:

    > My computer keep on getting a 169 address when trying to connect wirelessly
    > to a WPA-PSK and WEP enabled network. Not only is my computer but the rest
    > of the wirelessly connected computers. I'm on an internal wireless, while
    > two other laptops are using a NIC. When using an ethernet cable to connect
    > the laptops to the router they work, so it's only a wireless problem.


    The two laptops using a NIC are ok, so you need to know their
    IP addresses. Run command then ipconfig /all > C:\ipconfig.txt

    ipconfig.txt should give you their IP addresses and hence their
    IP address range. It probably won't start 169.nnn.nnn.nnn,
    in which event, trying to connect by wireless, with IP addresses
    starting 169 won't work.

    Simplest way to sort it might be static addressing using the same
    address range as the two hardwired laptops that work.
     
    , Apr 15, 2007
    #3
  4. From the weakest to the strongest, Wireless security capacity is.
    No Security
    MAC
    WEP
    WPA-PSK
    WPA-AES
    WPA2
    The documentation of your Wireless devices (Wireless Router, and Wireless
    Computers Card) should state the type of security that is available with
    your Wireless hardware.
    All devices MUST be set to the same security level using the same pass
    phrase.
    Therefore the security must be set according what ever is the best possible
    of one of the Wireless devices.
    I.e. even if most of your system might be capable to be configured to the
    max. with WPA2, but one device is only capable to be configured to max . of
    WEP, to whole system must be configured to WEP.
    If you need more good security and one device (like a Wireless card that can
    do WEP only) is holding better security for the whole Network, replace the
    device with a better one.
    Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Lorimar" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My computer keep on getting a 169 address when trying to connect
    > wirelessly
    > to a WPA-PSK and WEP enabled network. Not only is my computer but the
    > rest
    > of the wirelessly connected computers. I'm on an internal wireless, while
    > two other laptops are using a NIC. When using an ethernet cable to
    > connect
    > the laptops to the router they work, so it's only a wireless problem.
    >
    > When booting from a Linux CD (Ubuntu), I can connect easliy with a WEP
    > since
    > I have an internal wireless. I kinda learning about Linux at the moment
    > so
    > I'm not fully reliant on that CD.
    >
    > I have already done a full reboot of the network system, and I'm still
    > getting a 169 address on the laptop. I log into the router and it show
    > that
    > 169 address on the NAT portmap (i think it is).
    >
    > I also have a friend that has a WPA-PSK enabled network I get a 169
    > address
    > when trying to connect to his.
    >
    > I have an SMC router set on DHCP. My computer is a Dell Latitude D620
    > with
    > an Intel Pro Wireless.
    >
    > I've run AVG Anti-Spyware on my computer and nothing came up.
    >
    > My possible conclusions are:
    > 1) One of the computers contracted a virus, and spread it to every other
    > computer on the network.
    > 2) The router's messed up (maybe related to the WPA-PSK in some way).
    > 3) All of our computers are messed up somehow.
    >
    > Any help is greatly appreciated.
    >
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Apr 15, 2007
    #4
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