Is cable length relevent?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Jodie, Oct 21, 2005.

  1. Jodie

    Jodie Guest

    Going to network two pc's together with standard Ethernet cable and a hub.
    Is the length of cable between the pc's significant?
    .... For example will there be any difference in speed etc between using a
    total cable length of 10 metres and 6 metres?
    Cheers.
     
    Jodie, Oct 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. Jodie

    Goonerak Guest


    > Going to network two pc's together with standard Ethernet cable and a hub.
    > Is the length of cable between the pc's significant?
    > ... For example will there be any difference in speed etc between using a
    > total cable length of 10 metres and 6 metres?
    > Cheers.
    >


    There will be no difference in speed between the two cables. Ethernet is
    designed to connect two PCs up to 100 metres from the hub/switch.
     
    Goonerak, Oct 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. Jodie

    Plato Guest

    Jodie wrote:
    >
    > Going to network two pc's together with standard Ethernet cable and a hub.
    > Is the length of cable between the pc's significant?
    > ... For example will there be any difference in speed etc between using a
    > total cable length of 10 metres and 6 metres?


    No difference between 6 and 10 meters.





    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Oct 21, 2005
    #3
  4. Jodie

    spiker22 Guest

    Jodie wrote:
    > Going to network two pc's together with standard Ethernet cable and a hub.
    > Is the length of cable between the pc's significant?
    > ... For example will there be any difference in speed etc between using a
    > total cable length of 10 metres and 6 metres?
    > Cheers.
    >
    >

    NO
     
    spiker22, Oct 21, 2005
    #4
  5. Jodie

    why? Guest

    On Fri, 21 Oct 2005 20:58:00 +0100, Jodie wrote:

    >Going to network two pc's together with standard Ethernet cable and a hub.
    >Is the length of cable between the pc's significant?


    Yes,

    >... For example will there be any difference in speed etc between using a
    >total cable length of 10 metres and 6 metres?


    not until you are heading over 90m for Cat6 and 99m for Cat5(e) and
    pushing it at full speed and you have other issues.

    Me
     
    why?, Oct 21, 2005
    #5
  6. Jodie

    Stickems. Guest

    To be pedantic, there is a small difference, but it is very small.


    "Jodie" <> wrote in message
    news:djbh81$te8$...
    | Going to network two pc's together with standard Ethernet cable and a hub.
    | Is the length of cable between the pc's significant?
    | ... For example will there be any difference in speed etc between using a
    | total cable length of 10 metres and 6 metres?
    | Cheers.
    |
    |
     
    Stickems., Oct 22, 2005
    #6
  7. Jodie

    why? Guest

    On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 11:13:06 GMT, Stickems. wrote:

    >To be pedantic, there is a small difference, but it is very small.


    This small . <--- ?

    >"Jodie" <> wrote in message
    >news:djbh81$te8$...
    >| Going to network two pc's together with standard Ethernet cable and a hub.
    >| Is the length of cable between the pc's significant?
    >| ... For example will there be any difference in speed etc between using a
    >| total cable length of 10 metres and 6 metres?


    Me
     
    why?, Oct 22, 2005
    #7
  8. Stickems. wrote:
    > To be pedantic, there is a small difference, but it is very small.


    I'd read about someone else doing it, so thought I would too. Crimped on
    a RJ45 at each end of a 1,000 foot spool of cat5 and tried to network.
    Worked fine, probably was limited to 10Mbs, that was still faster than
    the internet connection I was testing it on. But that 300' or 100 meter
    limit is mostly theoretical, not a brick wall.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Oct 23, 2005
    #8
  9. Jodie

    Jodie Guest

    "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Stickems. wrote:
    >> To be pedantic, there is a small difference, but it is very small.

    >
    > I'd read about someone else doing it, so thought I would too. Crimped on a
    > RJ45 at each end of a 1,000 foot spool of cat5 and tried to network.
    > Worked fine, probably was limited to 10Mbs, that was still faster than the
    > internet connection I was testing it on. But that 300' or 100 meter limit
    > is mostly theoretical, not a brick wall.

    ------
    Ok. TVM. Jodie
     
    Jodie, Oct 23, 2005
    #9
  10. Jodie

    . Guest

    I've had occasion to go beyond 300' a time or two and saw speed drop
    but no appreciable loss or degredation of data. If you want to insure
    that speed and data remain constant then make your run about 200 to
    250 feet into a switch, then come from that switch into your device,
    or into another switch then out again if you need to go longer yet.

    The switches don't need to be expensive rigs either. Most any 5-porter
    (e.g. Linksys, D-link, etc.) that you can get for around $20.00 will
    do the trick.

    On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 19:59:22 -0400, Rôgêr <> wrote:

    >Stickems. wrote:
    >> To be pedantic, there is a small difference, but it is very small.

    >
    >I'd read about someone else doing it, so thought I would too. Crimped on
    >a RJ45 at each end of a 1,000 foot spool of cat5 and tried to network.
    >Worked fine, probably was limited to 10Mbs, that was still faster than
    >the internet connection I was testing it on. But that 300' or 100 meter
    >limit is mostly theoretical, not a brick wall.
     
    ., Oct 29, 2005
    #10
  11. Jodie

    Plato Guest

    .. wrote:
    >
    > I've had occasion to go beyond 300' a time or two and saw speed drop
    > but no appreciable loss or degredation of data. If you want to insure


    Right, the 300 is more or less a guideline.

    > >I'd read about someone else doing it, so thought I would too. Crimped on
    > >a RJ45 at each end of a 1,000 foot spool of cat5 and tried to network.
    > >Worked fine, probably was limited to 10Mbs, that was still faster than
    > >the internet connection I was testing it on. But that 300' or 100 meter
    > >limit is mostly theoretical, not a brick wall.


    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Oct 29, 2005
    #11
  12. Jodie

    Keme Guest

    .. wrote:
    > I've had occasion to go beyond 300' a time or two and saw speed drop
    > but no appreciable loss or degredation of data. If you want to insure
    > that speed and data remain constant then make your run about 200 to
    > 250 feet into a switch, then come from that switch into your device,
    > or into another switch then out again if you need to go longer yet.
    >
    > The switches don't need to be expensive rigs either. Most any 5-porter
    > (e.g. Linksys, D-link, etc.) that you can get for around $20.00 will
    > do the trick.
    >

    [...]
    300' is approximately the maximum length where any packet will fill the
    entire cable. This is not very important when you have a single
    connection through the cable. In that case signal attenuation and
    degradation is more important, and higher speeds are more sensitive to
    those effects, hence the speed drop. Switches may clean up and amplify
    the signal, so using them as repeaters may prove effective.

    When multiple connections request use of the cable, the "collision
    detection" part of the ethernet link layer protocol (CSMA/CD) is
    important. If the cable is too long, some collisions may not be
    detected, and packets are sent simultaneously through the same cable
    segment. This is an undetected collision, which leads to packet errors,
    often not discovered immediately. Late discovery leads to late
    retransmission, which amplifies packet buildup and network saturation.

    With some luck the network may still work with multiple nodes on both
    ends of the long stretch, but any load inrease will probably have a huge
    impact on network performance.
     
    Keme, Oct 30, 2005
    #12
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