Is a open ping port a problem?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Bull Durham, Feb 17, 2005.

  1. Bull Durham

    Bull Durham Guest

    I am in the process of setting up a wireless network with
    three computers using Bell South DSL and ICS.

    I think I have succeeded by solving my last problem and that
    was being able to see and be seen on the Toshiba LapTop by
    removing Norton's System Works. Do I need antiviral
    protection, pop up blockers, ad aware, spybot, Zone Alarm,
    etc. or programs similar to this on the client computers?

    Also, I ran a Security Check on line at Norton WWW site. My
    Hacker Exposure Check results were all closed or in stealth
    mode except for two. The two were a open ping port (ICMP
    ping) and a HTTP port (110). Since I do send and receive
    HTML type emails, I will assume that this open port (110)
    is open for that reason and therefore acceptable as I am
    willing to assume the risk considering that I have Mail
    Washer, Zone Alarm, Sybot-SD, Ad Aware SE. and AVG
    installed. Is my assumption well thought out.

    Does the open ping port pose an unacceptable risk? Don't I
    need it open to operate the Wireless Network? What is the
    recommended solution. Am I be overly concerned with
    Hackers?

    I am a new DSL user (formerly on Phone dial-up) as well as a
    new Network user and a ICS user.

    Thanks for any and all input to relieve my concerns or
    correct my problem thinking.

    John
     
    Bull Durham, Feb 17, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Bull Durham

    george Guest

    inline


    "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am in the process of setting up a wireless network with
    > three computers using Bell South DSL and ICS.
    >
    > I think I have succeeded by solving my last problem and that
    > was being able to see and be seen on the Toshiba LapTop by
    > removing Norton's System Works. Do I need antiviral
    > protection, pop up blockers, ad aware, spybot, Zone Alarm,
    > etc. or programs similar to this on the client computers?


    Not familiar with the equipement you're using for your DSL connection, but
    if, like you say, you are using Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) then
    basically every machine in your network only makes use of the 'physical'
    connection to the internet provided by 1 machine.
    That machine does nothing but 'shuffle' (if you like) the data through the
    network connection without looking at it, so each machine will have to have
    its own protection software (antiviral, blockers,spybots, firewall, etc.)

    >
    > Also, I ran a Security Check on line at Norton WWW site. My
    > Hacker Exposure Check results were all closed or in stealth
    > mode except for two. The two were a open ping port (ICMP
    > ping) and a HTTP port (110). Since I do send and receive
    > HTML type emails, I will assume that this open port (110)
    > is open for that reason and therefore acceptable as I am
    > willing to assume the risk considering that I have Mail
    > Washer, Zone Alarm, Sybot-SD, Ad Aware SE. and AVG
    > installed. Is my assumption well thought out.


    Port 110 is used for mail (notably incoming mail using the POP3 protocol,
    like in outlook(express))
    It has nothing to do with the fact that you are using HTML coded
    mailmessages.
    HTML is merely a method of puttig your messages in a particular format,
    notably HTML format.
    You might want to check out your connection using ShieldsUp at Gibson
    Reasearch www.grc.com.
    Do the check from all of your machines, once you've got them working.

    >
    > Does the open ping port pose an unacceptable risk? Don't I
    > need it open to operate the Wireless Network?


    Ideally all ports should be closed/stealthed, looking at them 'from the
    outside'
    'Closed' still indicates to the world that the machine as such exists on the
    net.
    'Stealth' doesn't provide any clue as to the existance of any machine
    whatsoever at that address/port.


    > What is the recommended solution.


    Use the firewall function in your DSL equipement (if present) or (if none
    present) a firewall solution on every machine

    > Am I be overly concerned with Hackers?


    IMHO not.
    'Overly', maybe.
    'Concerned' is a very good thing.
    There are some pretty sick people out there.


    >
    > I am a new DSL user (formerly on Phone dial-up) as well as a
    > new Network user and a ICS user.
    >
    > Thanks for any and all input to relieve my concerns or
    > correct my problem thinking.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    >


    george
     
    george, Feb 17, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Bull Durham

    Bull Durham Guest

    Thanks George,

    I have read your in-line reply several times. Although some
    it may be above my compression level, I think I will be
    able to do as you suggested. I am clear that both client
    computers need essentially the same or equal protection as
    the host from the "do bads.

    I did do a ShieldUp test on the Host Computer. Some parts
    appeared to have passed and some did not. I will return
    ASAP and rerun and try and understand more by rereading the
    info as closely as possible in a attempt to fix if required.
    Also, will take the two other Computer thru the test ASAP.

    As I understand my DSL Westel Modem and SMC Barricade Router
    offers me hardware protection. But, I am not sure so will
    try and find out more about the equipment. I think I have
    the MS Firewall system on the two client Computers. I
    probably will reinstall Zone Alarm. It appeared that Zone
    Alarm and Norton's were keeping my Wireless Network from
    working..

    Thanks Again. I do appreciate your time and effort.

    John

    "george" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    inline


    "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am in the process of setting up a wireless network with
    > three computers using Bell South DSL and ICS.
    >
    > I think I have succeeded by solving my last problem and
    > that
    > was being able to see and be seen on the Toshiba LapTop by
    > removing Norton's System Works. Do I need antiviral
    > protection, pop up blockers, ad aware, spybot, Zone Alarm,
    > etc. or programs similar to this on the client computers?


    Not familiar with the equipement you're using for your DSL
    connection, but
    if, like you say, you are using Internet Connection Sharing
    (ICS) then
    basically every machine in your network only makes use of
    the 'physical'
    connection to the internet provided by 1 machine.
    That machine does nothing but 'shuffle' (if you like) the
    data through the
    network connection without looking at it, so each machine
    will have to have
    its own protection software (antiviral, blockers,spybots,
    firewall, etc.)

    >
    > Also, I ran a Security Check on line at Norton WWW site.
    > My
    > Hacker Exposure Check results were all closed or in
    > stealth
    > mode except for two. The two were a open ping port (ICMP
    > ping) and a HTTP port (110). Since I do send and receive
    > HTML type emails, I will assume that this open port (110)
    > is open for that reason and therefore acceptable as I am
    > willing to assume the risk considering that I have Mail
    > Washer, Zone Alarm, Sybot-SD, Ad Aware SE. and AVG
    > installed. Is my assumption well thought out.


    Port 110 is used for mail (notably incoming mail using the
    POP3 protocol,
    like in outlook(express))
    It has nothing to do with the fact that you are using HTML
    coded
    mailmessages.
    HTML is merely a method of puttig your messages in a
    particular format,
    notably HTML format.
    You might want to check out your connection using ShieldsUp
    at Gibson
    Reasearch www.grc.com.
    Do the check from all of your machines, once you've got them
    working.

    >
    > Does the open ping port pose an unacceptable risk? Don't I
    > need it open to operate the Wireless Network?


    Ideally all ports should be closed/stealthed, looking at
    them 'from the
    outside'
    'Closed' still indicates to the world that the machine as
    such exists on the
    net.
    'Stealth' doesn't provide any clue as to the existance of
    any machine
    whatsoever at that address/port.


    > What is the recommended solution.


    Use the firewall function in your DSL equipement (if
    present) or (if none
    present) a firewall solution on every machine

    > Am I be overly concerned with Hackers?


    IMHO not.
    'Overly', maybe.
    'Concerned' is a very good thing.
    There are some pretty sick people out there.


    >
    > I am a new DSL user (formerly on Phone dial-up) as well as
    > a
    > new Network user and a ICS user.
    >
    > Thanks for any and all input to relieve my concerns or
    > correct my problem thinking.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    >


    george
     
    Bull Durham, Feb 18, 2005
    #3
  4. Bull Durham

    george Guest

    "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks George,
    >
    > I have read your in-line reply several times. Although some
    > it may be above my compression level, I think I will be
    > able to do as you suggested. I am clear that both client
    > computers need essentially the same or equal protection as
    > the host from the "do bads.
    >
    > I did do a ShieldUp test on the Host Computer. Some parts
    > appeared to have passed and some did not. I will return
    > ASAP and rerun and try and understand more by rereading the
    > info as closely as possible in a attempt to fix if required.
    > Also, will take the two other Computer thru the test ASAP.
    >
    > As I understand my DSL Westel Modem and SMC Barricade Router
    > offers me hardware protection. But, I am not sure so will
    > try and find out more about the equipment. I think I have
    > the MS Firewall system on the two client Computers. I
    > probably will reinstall Zone Alarm. It appeared that Zone
    > Alarm and Norton's were keeping my Wireless Network from
    > working..
    >
    > Thanks Again. I do appreciate your time and effort.
    >
    > John
    >
    > "george" <> wrote in
    > message news:...
    > inline
    >
    >
    > "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I am in the process of setting up a wireless network with
    >> three computers using Bell South DSL and ICS.
    >>
    >> I think I have succeeded by solving my last problem and
    >> that
    >> was being able to see and be seen on the Toshiba LapTop by
    >> removing Norton's System Works. Do I need antiviral
    >> protection, pop up blockers, ad aware, spybot, Zone Alarm,
    >> etc. or programs similar to this on the client computers?

    >
    > Not familiar with the equipement you're using for your DSL
    > connection, but
    > if, like you say, you are using Internet Connection Sharing
    > (ICS) then
    > basically every machine in your network only makes use of
    > the 'physical'
    > connection to the internet provided by 1 machine.
    > That machine does nothing but 'shuffle' (if you like) the
    > data through the
    > network connection without looking at it, so each machine
    > will have to have
    > its own protection software (antiviral, blockers,spybots,
    > firewall, etc.)
    >
    >>
    >> Also, I ran a Security Check on line at Norton WWW site.
    >> My
    >> Hacker Exposure Check results were all closed or in
    >> stealth
    >> mode except for two. The two were a open ping port (ICMP
    >> ping) and a HTTP port (110). Since I do send and receive
    >> HTML type emails, I will assume that this open port (110)
    >> is open for that reason and therefore acceptable as I am
    >> willing to assume the risk considering that I have Mail
    >> Washer, Zone Alarm, Sybot-SD, Ad Aware SE. and AVG
    >> installed. Is my assumption well thought out.

    >
    > Port 110 is used for mail (notably incoming mail using the
    > POP3 protocol,
    > like in outlook(express))
    > It has nothing to do with the fact that you are using HTML
    > coded
    > mailmessages.
    > HTML is merely a method of puttig your messages in a
    > particular format,
    > notably HTML format.
    > You might want to check out your connection using ShieldsUp
    > at Gibson
    > Reasearch www.grc.com.
    > Do the check from all of your machines, once you've got them
    > working.
    >
    >>
    >> Does the open ping port pose an unacceptable risk? Don't I
    >> need it open to operate the Wireless Network?

    >
    > Ideally all ports should be closed/stealthed, looking at
    > them 'from the
    > outside'
    > 'Closed' still indicates to the world that the machine as
    > such exists on the
    > net.
    > 'Stealth' doesn't provide any clue as to the existance of
    > any machine
    > whatsoever at that address/port.
    >
    >
    >> What is the recommended solution.

    >
    > Use the firewall function in your DSL equipement (if
    > present) or (if none
    > present) a firewall solution on every machine
    >
    >> Am I be overly concerned with Hackers?

    >
    > IMHO not.
    > 'Overly', maybe.
    > 'Concerned' is a very good thing.
    > There are some pretty sick people out there.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> I am a new DSL user (formerly on Phone dial-up) as well as
    >> a
    >> new Network user and a ICS user.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any and all input to relieve my concerns or
    >> correct my problem thinking.
    >>
    >> John
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > george
    >
    >
    >



    Bill,

    Your Barricade router will (very likely) have an integrated 4 port switch
    (on the Local Area Network or LAN side) that enables you to physically
    connect your pc's to it, using utp network cables.
    It will also have the capability to provide LAN IP addressing information
    (like ip addr/subnet mask/default gateway/dns server addr) to your pc's
    (this functionality is called DHCP).
    It will also have Network Address Translation (or NAT) capability, so it
    will do the address translation needed to get out to the internet.
    Because of this translation, your internal network addresses will not be
    directly accessible from the outside and this basically constitutes a
    hardware based firewall functionality.
    Having said that you now have a couple of choices.
    You can see if the default firewall configuration of the router meets your
    needs and adjust it if need be.
    I'd definitely recommend that.
    It will however entail getting into the subject of protocols and ports in
    more detail in order to do that correctly.
    Next there is the SP2 Windows Firewall (part of Security Center) that also
    plays a part here.
    Per default that (software based) firewall is turned on and lacks some
    functionality. Notably it doesn't examine outgoing traffic to be traffic
    that is allowed. It just 'assumes' (since it is traffic initiated on the
    inside) that it is therefor allowed. (And we all know what 'assuming' means
    :))
    (eg. some 'malware' program that establishes contact to the outside world,
    without you knowing, will not be hindered by this firewall).
    Then there are other (software based) firewalls, like you mentioned
    ZoneAlarm.
    They too do a fine job, one better then the other, but who's counting.
    There is no real gain in having more than one software based firewall
    running on the same machine.
    Au contraire, it will be a performance hit and possibly increase the chance
    for 'false positives', depending on how good each one of them is.

    hth (and doesn't confuse the issue)

    george
     
    george, Feb 18, 2005
    #4
  5. Bull Durham

    Bull Durham Guest

    "george" <> wrote in
    message news:%23rGc$...

    "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks George,
    >
    > I have read your in-line reply several times. Although
    > some
    > it may be above my compression level, I think I will be
    > able to do as you suggested. I am clear that both client
    > computers need essentially the same or equal protection as
    > the host from the "do bads.
    >
    > I did do a ShieldUp test on the Host Computer. Some parts
    > appeared to have passed and some did not. I will return
    > ASAP and rerun and try and understand more by rereading
    > the
    > info as closely as possible in a attempt to fix if
    > required.
    > Also, will take the two other Computer thru the test ASAP.
    >
    > As I understand my DSL Westel Modem and SMC Barricade
    > Router
    > offers me hardware protection. But, I am not sure so will
    > try and find out more about the equipment. I think I have
    > the MS Firewall system on the two client Computers. I
    > probably will reinstall Zone Alarm. It appeared that Zone
    > Alarm and Norton's were keeping my Wireless Network from
    > working..
    >
    > Thanks Again. I do appreciate your time and effort.
    >
    > John
    >
    > "george" <> wrote in
    > message news:...
    > inline
    >
    >
    > "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I am in the process of setting up a wireless network with
    >> three computers using Bell South DSL and ICS.
    >>
    >> I think I have succeeded by solving my last problem and
    >> that
    >> was being able to see and be seen on the Toshiba LapTop
    >> by
    >> removing Norton's System Works. Do I need antiviral
    >> protection, pop up blockers, ad aware, spybot, Zone
    >> Alarm,
    >> etc. or programs similar to this on the client computers?

    >
    > Not familiar with the equipement you're using for your DSL
    > connection, but
    > if, like you say, you are using Internet Connection
    > Sharing
    > (ICS) then
    > basically every machine in your network only makes use of
    > the 'physical'
    > connection to the internet provided by 1 machine.
    > That machine does nothing but 'shuffle' (if you like) the
    > data through the
    > network connection without looking at it, so each machine
    > will have to have
    > its own protection software (antiviral, blockers,spybots,
    > firewall, etc.)
    >
    >>
    >> Also, I ran a Security Check on line at Norton WWW site.
    >> My
    >> Hacker Exposure Check results were all closed or in
    >> stealth
    >> mode except for two. The two were a open ping port (ICMP
    >> ping) and a HTTP port (110). Since I do send and receive
    >> HTML type emails, I will assume that this open port
    >> (110)
    >> is open for that reason and therefore acceptable as I am
    >> willing to assume the risk considering that I have Mail
    >> Washer, Zone Alarm, Sybot-SD, Ad Aware SE. and AVG
    >> installed. Is my assumption well thought out.

    >
    > Port 110 is used for mail (notably incoming mail using the
    > POP3 protocol,
    > like in outlook(express))
    > It has nothing to do with the fact that you are using HTML
    > coded
    > mailmessages.
    > HTML is merely a method of puttig your messages in a
    > particular format,
    > notably HTML format.
    > You might want to check out your connection using
    > ShieldsUp
    > at Gibson
    > Reasearch www.grc.com.
    > Do the check from all of your machines, once you've got
    > them
    > working.
    >
    >>
    >> Does the open ping port pose an unacceptable risk? Don't
    >> I
    >> need it open to operate the Wireless Network?

    >
    > Ideally all ports should be closed/stealthed, looking at
    > them 'from the
    > outside'
    > 'Closed' still indicates to the world that the machine as
    > such exists on the
    > net.
    > 'Stealth' doesn't provide any clue as to the existance of
    > any machine
    > whatsoever at that address/port.
    >
    >
    >> What is the recommended solution.

    >
    > Use the firewall function in your DSL equipement (if
    > present) or (if none
    > present) a firewall solution on every machine
    >
    >> Am I be overly concerned with Hackers?

    >
    > IMHO not.
    > 'Overly', maybe.
    > 'Concerned' is a very good thing.
    > There are some pretty sick people out there.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> I am a new DSL user (formerly on Phone dial-up) as well
    >> as
    >> a
    >> new Network user and a ICS user.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any and all input to relieve my concerns or
    >> correct my problem thinking.
    >>
    >> John
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > george
    >
    >
    >



    Bill,

    Your Barricade router will (very likely) have an integrated
    4 port switch
    (on the Local Area Network or LAN side) that enables you to
    physically
    connect your pc's to it, using utp network cables.
    It will also have the capability to provide LAN IP
    addressing information
    (like ip addr/subnet mask/default gateway/dns server addr)
    to your pc's
    (this functionality is called DHCP).
    It will also have Network Address Translation (or NAT)
    capability, so it
    will do the address translation needed to get out to the
    internet.
    Because of this translation, your internal network addresses
    will not be
    directly accessible from the outside and this basically
    constitutes a
    hardware based firewall functionality.
    Having said that you now have a couple of choices.
    You can see if the default firewall configuration of the
    router meets your
    needs and adjust it if need be.
    I'd definitely recommend that.
    It will however entail getting into the subject of protocols
    and ports in
    more detail in order to do that correctly.
    Next there is the SP2 Windows Firewall (part of Security
    Center) that also
    plays a part here.
    Per default that (software based) firewall is turned on and
    lacks some
    functionality. Notably it doesn't examine outgoing traffic
    to be traffic
    that is allowed. It just 'assumes' (since it is traffic
    initiated on the
    inside) that it is therefor allowed. (And we all know what
    'assuming' means
    :))
    (eg. some 'malware' program that establishes contact to the
    outside world,
    without you knowing, will not be hindered by this firewall).
    Then there are other (software based) firewalls, like you
    mentioned
    ZoneAlarm.
    They too do a fine job, one better then the other, but who's
    counting.
    There is no real gain in having more than one software based
    firewall
    running on the same machine.
    Au contraire, it will be a performance hit and possibly
    increase the chance
    for 'false positives', depending on how good each one of
    them is.

    hth (and doesn't confuse the issue)

    george

    Thanks again George for the good info. Sorry that I did not
    reply sooner but have been busy. I did want to study or at
    least read some from my 124 Page Barricade Manual and check
    a little more with my DSL service provider on system type
    before responding. However, I did not get around to it.

    I really don't know for sure what I am talking about but
    from the intro from the Barricade.

    1. It provides DHCP for dynamic IP configuration and DNS
    for domain name mapping.

    I think my DSL provider provides DHCP - my IP address and
    ADSL is different each time I check with ShieldUp..

    2. Provides Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI) firewall with
    client privilege, hacker prevention, and NAT.

    Plus other Features and Benefits. It is 2.4 GHZ 11 MBPS
    Wireless Cable/DS and 802.11b compliant. I bought it some
    time ago and just now have been able to use it because I now
    have DSL.

    I have been playing a little trying to get Zone Alarm to
    tunnel or pass sharing files and printers. I am not sure
    that I am successful but can see my other computers when
    Zone Alarm is turned off. This situation is also present on
    my other Computers using Norton Suite on one and Zone Alarm
    on the others. I think I will be able to resolve the
    problem and still have software protection on the other
    Computers without resorting to turning off the Firewall
    Software protection. Just hope that I am not hit with any
    "do bads" until I am able..

    Thanks so much for your help.

    John
     
    Bull Durham, Feb 20, 2005
    #5
  6. Bull Durham

    DLink Guru Guest

    Just an FYI also, If you place a router in your network, most have built in
    firewall protection, it will stealth all your ports and you wont have to
    worry about it.


    "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am in the process of setting up a wireless network with
    > three computers using Bell South DSL and ICS.
    >
    > I think I have succeeded by solving my last problem and that
    > was being able to see and be seen on the Toshiba LapTop by
    > removing Norton's System Works. Do I need antiviral
    > protection, pop up blockers, ad aware, spybot, Zone Alarm,
    > etc. or programs similar to this on the client computers?
    >
    > Also, I ran a Security Check on line at Norton WWW site. My
    > Hacker Exposure Check results were all closed or in stealth
    > mode except for two. The two were a open ping port (ICMP
    > ping) and a HTTP port (110). Since I do send and receive
    > HTML type emails, I will assume that this open port (110)
    > is open for that reason and therefore acceptable as I am
    > willing to assume the risk considering that I have Mail
    > Washer, Zone Alarm, Sybot-SD, Ad Aware SE. and AVG
    > installed. Is my assumption well thought out.
    >
    > Does the open ping port pose an unacceptable risk? Don't I
    > need it open to operate the Wireless Network? What is the
    > recommended solution. Am I be overly concerned with
    > Hackers?
    >
    > I am a new DSL user (formerly on Phone dial-up) as well as a
    > new Network user and a ICS user.
    >
    > Thanks for any and all input to relieve my concerns or
    > correct my problem thinking.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    >
     
    DLink Guru, Feb 20, 2005
    #6
  7. Bull Durham

    Bull Durham Guest

    OK DLink Guru. I will consider that option. I am not sure
    how to set up another router to operate in conjunction with
    my Toshiba built in wireless system (card). Would it be
    better or just as good as using Zone Alarm, Spybot, Adaware,
    and a Popup stopper. You do mean that by setting up the
    router that it would not be necessary to use the proceeding
    software programs for my Lap Top?

    Thanks again for your suggestion.

    John

    "DLink Guru" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    Just an FYI also, If you place a router in your network,
    most have built in
    firewall protection, it will stealth all your ports and you
    wont have to
    worry about it.


    "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am in the process of setting up a wireless network with
    > three computers using Bell South DSL and ICS.
    >
    > I think I have succeeded by solving my last problem and
    > that
    > was being able to see and be seen on the Toshiba LapTop by
    > removing Norton's System Works. Do I need antiviral
    > protection, pop up blockers, ad aware, spybot, Zone Alarm,
    > etc. or programs similar to this on the client computers?
    >
    > Also, I ran a Security Check on line at Norton WWW site.
    > My
    > Hacker Exposure Check results were all closed or in
    > stealth
    > mode except for two. The two were a open ping port (ICMP
    > ping) and a HTTP port (110). Since I do send and receive
    > HTML type emails, I will assume that this open port (110)
    > is open for that reason and therefore acceptable as I am
    > willing to assume the risk considering that I have Mail
    > Washer, Zone Alarm, Spybot-SD, Ad Aware SE. and AVG
    > installed. Is my assumption well thought out.
    >
    > Does the open ping port pose an unacceptable risk? Don't I
    > need it open to operate the Wireless Network? What is the
    > recommended solution. Am I be overly concerned with
    > Hackers?
    >
    > I am a new DSL user (formerly on Phone dial-up) as well as
    > a
    > new Network user and a ICS user.
    >
    > Thanks for any and all input to relieve my concerns or
    > correct my problem thinking.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    >
     
    Bull Durham, Feb 20, 2005
    #7
  8. Bull Durham

    DLink Guru Guest

    No, spyware is mainly recieved by surfing internet sites and being installed
    via your browser, has nothing to do with firewalling, and the same with
    popups. Routers will physically stealth your ports to the Internet side of
    your network making it appear that you do not even have a connection to the
    Internet, effectivly hiding you from potential hackers and not allowing any
    backdoor trojans or file servers to run on your systems with out your
    knowlede. Popups and malware are totally differnt animals. I run Spyware
    Doctore (with a popup blocker), Microsoft Anti Spyware Beta, Microsoft SP2
    Firewall and Norton Antivirus 2004. All this is for added Protection. Cant
    ever have enough with todays Geeks out there.


    "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > OK DLink Guru. I will consider that option. I am not sure
    > how to set up another router to operate in conjunction with
    > my Toshiba built in wireless system (card). Would it be
    > better or just as good as using Zone Alarm, Spybot, Adaware,
    > and a Popup stopper. You do mean that by setting up the
    > router that it would not be necessary to use the proceeding
    > software programs for my Lap Top?
    >
    > Thanks again for your suggestion.
    >
    > John
    >
    > "DLink Guru" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    > Just an FYI also, If you place a router in your network,
    > most have built in
    > firewall protection, it will stealth all your ports and you
    > wont have to
    > worry about it.
    >
    >
    > "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I am in the process of setting up a wireless network with
    >> three computers using Bell South DSL and ICS.
    >>
    >> I think I have succeeded by solving my last problem and
    >> that
    >> was being able to see and be seen on the Toshiba LapTop by
    >> removing Norton's System Works. Do I need antiviral
    >> protection, pop up blockers, ad aware, spybot, Zone Alarm,
    >> etc. or programs similar to this on the client computers?
    >>
    >> Also, I ran a Security Check on line at Norton WWW site.
    >> My
    >> Hacker Exposure Check results were all closed or in
    >> stealth
    >> mode except for two. The two were a open ping port (ICMP
    >> ping) and a HTTP port (110). Since I do send and receive
    >> HTML type emails, I will assume that this open port (110)
    >> is open for that reason and therefore acceptable as I am
    >> willing to assume the risk considering that I have Mail
    >> Washer, Zone Alarm, Spybot-SD, Ad Aware SE. and AVG
    >> installed. Is my assumption well thought out.
    >>
    >> Does the open ping port pose an unacceptable risk? Don't I
    >> need it open to operate the Wireless Network? What is the
    >> recommended solution. Am I be overly concerned with
    >> Hackers?
    >>
    >> I am a new DSL user (formerly on Phone dial-up) as well as
    >> a
    >> new Network user and a ICS user.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any and all input to relieve my concerns or
    >> correct my problem thinking.
    >>
    >> John
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
     
    DLink Guru, Feb 20, 2005
    #8
  9. Bull Durham

    Bull Durham Guest

    Ok, DLink Guru. I understand and thanks so much for your
    quick and timely reply. I will continue to work to learn a
    little more about Wireless, Routers, etc. All traffic is
    thru my SMC Barricade Router via my desktop connection to
    the Internet. .

    John


    "DLink Guru" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    No, spyware is mainly recieved by surfing internet sites and
    being installed
    via your browser, has nothing to do with firewalling, and
    the same with
    popups. Routers will physically stealth your ports to the
    Internet side of
    your network making it appear that you do not even have a
    connection to the
    Internet, effectivly hiding you from potential hackers and
    not allowing any
    backdoor trojans or file servers to run on your systems with
    out your
    knowlede. Popups and malware are totally differnt animals. I
    run Spyware
    Doctore (with a popup blocker), Microsoft Anti Spyware Beta,
    Microsoft SP2
    Firewall and Norton Antivirus 2004. All this is for added
    Protection. Cant
    ever have enough with todays Geeks out there.


    "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > OK DLink Guru. I will consider that option. I am not
    > sure
    > how to set up another router to operate in conjunction
    > with
    > my Toshiba built in wireless system (card). Would it be
    > better or just as good as using Zone Alarm, Spybot,
    > Adaware,
    > and a Popup stopper. You do mean that by setting up the
    > router that it would not be necessary to use the
    > proceeding
    > software programs for my Lap Top?
    >
    > Thanks again for your suggestion.
    >
    > John
    >
    > "DLink Guru" <> wrote in
    > message
    > news:%...
    > Just an FYI also, If you place a router in your network,
    > most have built in
    > firewall protection, it will stealth all your ports and
    > you
    > wont have to
    > worry about it.
    >
    >
    > "Bull Durham" <jsdbullspam@hotmail. com> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I am in the process of setting up a wireless network with
    >> three computers using Bell South DSL and ICS.
    >>
    >> I think I have succeeded by solving my last problem and
    >> that
    >> was being able to see and be seen on the Toshiba LapTop
    >> by
    >> removing Norton's System Works. Do I need antiviral
    >> protection, pop up blockers, ad aware, spybot, Zone
    >> Alarm,
    >> etc. or programs similar to this on the client computers?
    >>
    >> Also, I ran a Security Check on line at Norton WWW site.
    >> My
    >> Hacker Exposure Check results were all closed or in
    >> stealth
    >> mode except for two. The two were a open ping port (ICMP
    >> ping) and a HTTP port (110). Since I do send and receive
    >> HTML type emails, I will assume that this open port
    >> (110)
    >> is open for that reason and therefore acceptable as I am
    >> willing to assume the risk considering that I have Mail
    >> Washer, Zone Alarm, Spybot-SD, Ad Aware SE. and AVG
    >> installed. Is my assumption well thought out.
    >>
    >> Does the open ping port pose an unacceptable risk? Don't
    >> I
    >> need it open to operate the Wireless Network? What is
    >> the
    >> recommended solution. Am I be overly concerned with
    >> Hackers?
    >>
    >> I am a new DSL user (formerly on Phone dial-up) as well
    >> as
    >> a
    >> new Network user and a ICS user.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any and all input to relieve my concerns or
    >> correct my problem thinking.
    >>
    >> John
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
     
    Bull Durham, Feb 20, 2005
    #9
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