is a little high voltage hazardous?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by roror, Oct 9, 2003.

  1. roror

    roror Guest

    Hi all,

    My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.

    Thanks
    roror

    P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I am
    used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.
     
    roror, Oct 9, 2003
    #1
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  2. roror

    PiZzazA Guest

    BIG no no. Why not use 10 batteries with 2x5 configuration?
    "roror" <> wrote in message
    news:0dhhb.35769$...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    > charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    > power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    > recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    > anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >
    > Thanks
    > roror
    >
    > P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I am
    > used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.
    >
     
    PiZzazA, Oct 9, 2003
    #2
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  3. roror

    roror Guest

    Kool. Thanks.

    7 mins to reply. That is why I come to r.p.d :)

    roror

    PiZzazA wrote:
    > BIG no no. Why not use 10 batteries with 2x5 configuration?
    > "roror" <> wrote in message
    > news:0dhhb.35769$...
    >
    >>Hi all,
    >>
    >>My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    >>charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    >>power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    >>recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    >>anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >>
    >>Thanks
    >>roror
    >>
    >>P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I am
    >>used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.
    >>

    >
    >
    >
     
    roror, Oct 9, 2003
    #3
  4. roror <> writes:

    > My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    > charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    > power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    > recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    > anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.


    I had a battery operated slide viewer that took some voltage or other, and
    I put a higher voltage battery in it, since I didn't have the right
    one. After awhile, I started smelling something -- the solder was melting.

    I would expect the same from your camera. There's a joke about radio
    equipment: It runs on smoke, and once you let the smoke out, it won't work
    anymore. Same with cameras.
    --
    Philip Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
    Legal Assistance on the Web | spam and read later. email to philip@
    http://www.PhilipStripling.com/ | my domain is read daily.
     
    Phil Stripling, Oct 9, 2003
    #4
  5. roror

    Ron Hunter Guest

    roror wrote:

    > Hi all,
    >
    > My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    > charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    > power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    > recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    > anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >
    > Thanks
    > roror
    >
    > P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I am
    > used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.
    >

    DON'T. It would give 7.5 volts over the entire use life of the charge.
    NIMH batteries have a VERY flat discharge profile. Probably no harm
    would be done, but why do this when using only 5 batteries would give
    the proper voltage, and for 80% as long.
     
    Ron Hunter, Oct 9, 2003
    #5
  6. roror

    Robertwgross Guest

    A little too much voltage is only as hazardous as being a little bit pregnant.

    ---Bob Gross---
     
    Robertwgross, Oct 10, 2003
    #6
  7. roror

    mcgyverjones Guest

    "roror" <> wrote in message
    news:0dhhb.35769$...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    > charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    > power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    > recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    > anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.


    The real problem with this sort of thing is the internal resistance of the
    batteries. This affects the current available to the equipment and how much
    the voltage will drop under load.
    You indicate that the camera is designed to take 5 NiMH cells. Increasing
    the voltage will not help much and may create disastrous problems. Why not
    increase the size of the cells or double up in parallel to increase capacity
    (Amp Hours)?

    MJ
     
    mcgyverjones, Oct 10, 2003
    #7
  8. roror

    W6DKN Guest

    roror wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    > charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series
    > to power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two
    > after a recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a
    > setup? Has anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >
    > Thanks
    > roror
    >
    > P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I
    > am used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.


    Rather than run small capacity batteries in an over-voltage situation which
    *could* be harmful to your gear (and only give marginally better service),
    why not make up a SLA (sealed lead-acid, or gel cell) power pack instead? A
    10 amp hour 6 volt SLA can be had for less than $20.00, and making a power
    cord to connect to the camera is child's play. This will run your camera
    for a *very* long time and will have a *much* better shelf life than nimh.

    I use a home made 6 volt SLA battery pack to power my SB-80DX flash for
    heavy use occasions (like weddings, etc.). It provides un-ending, almost
    instant full power flash recycle, and goes for months between charges. By
    comparison, using 2,000 mAh nimh cells gave only about 60 flashes, with
    each recycle taking from 10 seconds (on a fresh set) to over a minute (as
    the batteries became more depleted).

    Total cost to make it (including battery, generic nylon belt case, and
    power connector cable) was about $25.00 (vs. over $250.00 for a Quantum
    Turbo commercial power pack). And it charges overnight with my Maha C777
    Plus universal charger, or you can use a small 6 volt trickle battery
    charger - or even a 6 volt "wall wart" - if you don't need it recharged
    very quickly.

    = Dan =
     
    W6DKN, Oct 10, 2003
    #8
  9. roror

    Eric Gisin Guest

    In article <0dhhb.35769$>,
    am says...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    > charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    > power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    > recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    > anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >

    I have one of those adjustable power supplies with multiple adapters. It
    gives over 7V when set to 6V. No problems on multiple products.
    >
    > P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I am
    > used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.
    >

    I would suggest an electronics group, most of the replies here are
    clueless. Your camera has a voltage regulator, a RISC CPU would never
    work on batteries directly.
     
    Eric Gisin, Oct 10, 2003
    #9
  10. roror

    W6DKN Guest

    roror wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    > charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series
    > to power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two
    > after a recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a
    > setup? Has anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >
    > Thanks
    > roror
    >
    > P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I
    > am used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.


    roror wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    > charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series
    > to power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two
    > after a recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a
    > setup? Has anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >
    > Thanks
    > roror
    >
    > P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I
    > am used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.


    Rather than run small capacity batteries in an over-voltage situation which
    could be harmful to your gear (and only give marginally better service),
    why not make up a SLA (sealed lead-acid, or gel cell) power pack instead? A
    10 amp hour 6 volt SLA can be had for less than $20.00, and making a power
    cord to connect to the camera is child's play. This will run your camera
    for a very long time and will have a much better shelf life than nimh.

    I use a home made 6 volt SLA battery pack to power my SB-80DX flash for
    heavy use occasions (like weddings, etc.). It provides un-ending, almost
    instant full power flash recycle, and goes for months between charges. By
    comparison, using 2,000 mAh nimh cells gave only about 60 flashes, with
    each recycle taking from 10 seconds (on a fresh set) to over a minute (as
    the batteries became more depleted).

    Total cost to make it (including battery, generic nylon belt case, and
    power connector cable) was about $25.00 (vs. over $250.00 for a Quantum
    Turbo commercial power pack). And it charges overnight with my Maha C777
    Plus universal charger, or you can use a small 6 volt trickle battery
    charger - or even a 6 volt "wall wart" - if you don't need it recharged
    very quickly.

    = Dan =
     
    W6DKN, Oct 10, 2003
    #10
  11. roror

    Junque Guest

    In article <>, Eric Gisin
    <> writes
    >In article <0dhhb.35769$>,
    > says...
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    >> charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    >> power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    >> recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    >> anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >>

    >I have one of those adjustable power supplies with multiple adapters. It
    >gives over 7V when set to 6V. No problems on multiple products.


    Since it is so much above the nominal voltage it can not be regulated,
    therefore I think you have measured the off-load voltage; the output
    voltage will drop on load. I expect it to be closer to 6v at 100mA or
    so.

    >> P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I am
    >> used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.
    >>

    >I would suggest an electronics group, most of the replies here are
    >clueless. Your camera has a voltage regulator, a RISC CPU would never
    >work on batteries directly.


    Of course it will have a regulator, almost certainly switched mode, but
    there is a limit to just how far over voltage it can be taken without
    harm.
    --
    Ian - to reply directly use ian (at) newbrain (dot) demon (dot) co (dot) uk
     
    Junque, Oct 11, 2003
    #11
  12. roror

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Junque wrote:

    > In article <>, Eric Gisin
    > <> writes
    >
    >> In article <0dhhb.35769$>,
    >> am says...
    >>
    >>> Hi all,
    >>>
    >>> My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    >>> charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    >>> power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    >>> recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    >>> anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >>>

    >> I have one of those adjustable power supplies with multiple adapters. It
    >> gives over 7V when set to 6V. No problems on multiple products.

    >
    >
    > Since it is so much above the nominal voltage it can not be regulated,
    > therefore I think you have measured the off-load voltage; the output
    > voltage will drop on load. I expect it to be closer to 6v at 100mA or so.
    >
    >>> P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I am
    >>> used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.
    >>>

    >> I would suggest an electronics group, most of the replies here are
    >> clueless. Your camera has a voltage regulator, a RISC CPU would never
    >> work on batteries directly.

    >
    >
    > Of course it will have a regulator, almost certainly switched mode, but
    > there is a limit to just how far over voltage it can be taken without harm.


    Not for NIMH batteries. They will deliver the rated power at the rated
    voltage until almost discharged.
    while the difference between 6 and 7.6 volts PROBABLY will do no harm,
    neither will it be a good thing.
     
    Ron Hunter, Oct 11, 2003
    #12
  13. roror

    Junque Guest

    In article <>, Ron Hunter
    <> writes
    >Junque wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>, Eric Gisin
    >><> writes
    >>
    >>> In article <0dhhb.35769$>,
    >>> am says...
    >>>
    >>>> Hi all,
    >>>>
    >>>> My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    >>>> charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    >>>> power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    >>>> recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    >>>> anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >>>>
    >>> I have one of those adjustable power supplies with multiple adapters. It
    >>> gives over 7V when set to 6V. No problems on multiple products.

    >> Since it is so much above the nominal voltage it can not be
    >>regulated, therefore I think you have measured the off-load voltage;
    >>the output voltage will drop on load. I expect it to be closer to 6v
    >>at 100mA or so.
    >>
    >>>> P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because
    >>>>I am
    >>>> used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.
    >>>>
    >>> I would suggest an electronics group, most of the replies here are
    >>> clueless. Your camera has a voltage regulator, a RISC CPU would never
    >>> work on batteries directly.

    >> Of course it will have a regulator, almost certainly switched mode,
    >>but there is a limit to just how far over voltage it can be taken
    >>without harm.

    >
    >Not for NIMH batteries. They will deliver the rated power at the rated
    >voltage until almost discharged.
    >while the difference between 6 and 7.6 volts PROBABLY will do no harm,
    >neither will it be a good thing.


    I THOUGHT that was what I said! I would consider 25% over voltage to be
    unwise. It might shut down at 7.6V rather than suffer destructive
    failure, at least I would design it to withstand as much abuse as could
    be reasonably incorporated without significantly increasing the
    production cost. After all I could design it to withstand being plugged
    into the mains, but that unreasonable (indeed excessive) abuse and would
    incur far to much cost to implement.
    --
    Ian - to reply directly use ian (at) newbrain (dot) demon (dot) co (dot) uk
     
    Junque, Oct 11, 2003
    #13
  14. roror

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Junque wrote:
    > In article <>, Ron Hunter
    > <> writes
    >
    >> Junque wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <>, Eric Gisin
    >>> <> writes
    >>>
    >>>> In article <0dhhb.35769$>,
    >>>> am says...
    >>>>
    >>>>> Hi all,
    >>>>>
    >>>>> My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    >>>>> charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in
    >>>>> series to
    >>>>> power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    >>>>> recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    >>>>> anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.
    >>>>>
    >>>> I have one of those adjustable power supplies with multiple
    >>>> adapters. It
    >>>> gives over 7V when set to 6V. No problems on multiple products.
    >>>
    >>> Since it is so much above the nominal voltage it can not be
    >>> regulated, therefore I think you have measured the off-load voltage;
    >>> the output voltage will drop on load. I expect it to be closer to 6v
    >>> at 100mA or so.
    >>>
    >>>>> P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because
    >>>>> I am
    >>>>> used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.
    >>>>>
    >>>> I would suggest an electronics group, most of the replies here are
    >>>> clueless. Your camera has a voltage regulator, a RISC CPU would never
    >>>> work on batteries directly.
    >>>
    >>> Of course it will have a regulator, almost certainly switched mode,
    >>> but there is a limit to just how far over voltage it can be taken
    >>> without harm.

    >>
    >>
    >> Not for NIMH batteries. They will deliver the rated power at the
    >> rated voltage until almost discharged.
    >> while the difference between 6 and 7.6 volts PROBABLY will do no harm,
    >> neither will it be a good thing.

    >
    >
    > I THOUGHT that was what I said! I would consider 25% over voltage to be
    > unwise. It might shut down at 7.6V rather than suffer destructive
    > failure, at least I would design it to withstand as much abuse as could
    > be reasonably incorporated without significantly increasing the
    > production cost. After all I could design it to withstand being plugged
    > into the mains, but that unreasonable (indeed excessive) abuse and would
    > incur far to much cost to implement.

    A lot depends on just how much voltage the camera really uses
    internally. If it has 4 AA NIMH cells, it probably is actually using
    either 3.3 or 4.5 volts for the chips, so it would have a voltage
    regulator which probably not be damaged by 7.5 volts, but WHY RISK IT?
     
    Ron Hunter, Oct 11, 2003
    #14
  15. roror

    Junque Guest

    In article <0dhhb.35769$>, roror
    <> writes
    >Hi all,
    >
    >My camera is designed to take 6v, But, as the NiMH batteries loose
    >charge quickly, I was thinking of putting 6 AA NiMH cells, in series to
    >power my camera. That would give 7.2V for the first day or two after a
    >recarge. Is it strictly a no-no? Is anyone using such a setup? Has
    >anyone burnt his/her camera by doing this.


    Presumably you mean using an external battery pack to supplement or
    supplant the internal battery; DON'T risk applying excess voltage, it
    could damage your camera and certainly would not be covered by any
    warranty. I would use five cells of higher capacity; i.e. if the
    internal are AAA use AA, if the internal are AA use 3/2 AA or C; you
    could use D but they are quite a bit heavier.

    >P.S. Mine is a 35mm slr (Oly iS-50). I am posting in r.p.d because I am
    >used to this ng and here ppl are more helpful than other ngs.


    No problem, from what I have seen from a brief foray into the 35mm
    equipment group you would probably get a huddled replies portraying
    sexual depravity.
    --
    Ian - to reply directly use ian (at) newbrain (dot) demon (dot) co (dot) uk
     
    Junque, Oct 11, 2003
    #15
  16. roror

    Junque Guest

    In article <>, Ron Hunter
    <> writes
    >Junque wrote:
    >> In article <>, Ron Hunter
    >><> writes
    >>
    >>> Junque wrote:

    -------------------
    >>>> Of course it will have a regulator, almost certainly switched
    >>>>mode, but there is a limit to just how far over voltage it can be
    >>>>taken without harm.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Not for NIMH batteries. They will deliver the rated power at the
    >>>rated voltage until almost discharged.
    >>> while the difference between 6 and 7.6 volts PROBABLY will do no
    >>>harm, neither will it be a good thing.

    >> I THOUGHT that was what I said! I would consider 25% over voltage
    >>to be unwise. It might shut down at 7.6V rather than suffer
    >>destructive failure, at least I would design it to withstand as much
    >>abuse as could be reasonably incorporated without significantly
    >>increasing the production cost. After all I could design it to
    >>withstand being plugged into the mains, but that unreasonable (indeed
    >>excessive) abuse and would incur far to much cost to implement.

    >A lot depends on just how much voltage the camera really uses
    >internally. If it has 4 AA NIMH cells, it probably is actually using
    >either 3.3 or 4.5 volts for the chips, so it would have a voltage
    >regulator which probably not be damaged by 7.5 volts, but WHY RISK IT?


    A MOST unwise assumption, it will probably also have -15 to -20v for the
    CCD. What so ever voltages the regulator has to produce a 25% excess i/p
    is still 25% more than its nominal operating design voltage. Don't risk
    it. If I were making an external pack I would used five 3/2 AA for
    compact size and weight, but if weight and size are not a major constant
    I would use five C or D cells.
    --
    Ian - to reply directly use ian (at) newbrain (dot) demon (dot) co (dot) uk
     
    Junque, Oct 11, 2003
    #16
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