Is 64-bit XP compatible with anything?

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with everything
    we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a standard
    Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that worked
    perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze. I
    tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to load.
    When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us that
    XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but I'm
    wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working system
    that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?
    =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=, Sep 3, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=

    NoNoBadDog! Guest

    "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    > everything
    > we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    > loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a standard
    > Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    > worked
    > perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze. I
    > tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to load.
    > When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us
    > that
    > XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    > everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but I'm
    > wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working system
    > that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    > videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?


    You bought your "dream machine" and did absolutely no research?
    You need 64 bit drivers for your hardware.
    Did you do any research at all?

    I am running WinXP Pro x64 on 3 machines with all hardware working under 64
    bit.
    I took the time to do a little research first, and knew that I could not use
    32 bit drivers.
    I took the time to find the drivers for all my hardware, either from the
    manufacturers website, or from www.planetamd64.com.

    Perhaps it is you who is not ready "for the future".

    Bobby
    NoNoBadDog!, Sep 3, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=

    MM Guest

    "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    > everything
    > we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    > loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a standard
    > Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    > worked
    > perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze. I
    > tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to load.
    > When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us
    > that
    > XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    > everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but I'm
    > wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working system
    > that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    > videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?


    Please, don't do it. The guys from Linksys said what they said because they
    haven't prepared drivers for XP x64 so, this is their fault, not yours! If
    anything in your system doesn't have drivers go to the company who sold you
    the computer with XP x64 and incompatible equipment. They should select it
    to work under x64.

    Sometimes you can use 32bit drivers but the situation changes rapidly every
    month and number of vendors add their support to x64. XP x64 is a working
    system, is god and stable and can be used for very hard tasks. We are just
    buying two two dual processor, dual core workstations based on AMD to be
    used for both office work as well as hard computing in science and
    photoediting under XP x64. The trials with the sample machine coused some
    problems at the beggining but all of them were cused by the lack of our
    knowledge not the system itself and all were solved (except of those with
    failed equipment).

    So, don't worry. I am sure you have a great machine but it only requires
    some of your tuning.
    Best wishes,
    Maciej
    MM, Sep 3, 2005
    #3
  4. =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=

    MM Guest

    "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    > everything
    > we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    > loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a standard
    > Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    > worked
    > perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze. I
    > tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to load.
    > When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us
    > that
    > XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    > everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but I'm
    > wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working system
    > that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    > videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?


    Please, don't do it. The guys from Linksys said what they said because they
    haven't prepared drivers for XP x64 so, this is their fault, not yours! If
    anything in your system doesn't have drivers go to the company who sold you
    the computer with XP x64 and incompatible equipment. They should select it
    to work under x64.

    Sometimes you can use 32bit drivers but the situation changes rapidly every
    month and number of vendors add their support to x64. XP x64 is a working
    system, is god and stable and can be used for very hard tasks. We are just
    buying two two dual processor, dual core workstations based on AMD to be
    used for both office work as well as hard computing in science and
    photoediting under XP x64. The trials with the sample machine coused some
    problems at the beggining but all of them were cused by the lack of our
    knowledge not the system itself and all were solved (except of those with
    failed equipment).

    So, don't worry. I am sure you have a great machine but it only requires
    some of your tuning.
    Best wishes,
    Maciej
    MM, Sep 3, 2005
    #4
  5. =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=

    MM Guest

    "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    > everything
    > we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    > loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a standard
    > Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    > worked
    > perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze. I
    > tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to load.
    > When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us
    > that
    > XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    > everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but I'm
    > wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working system
    > that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    > videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?


    Please, don't do it. The guys from Linksys said what they said because they
    haven't prepared drivers for XP x64 so, this is their fault, not yours! If
    anything in your system doesn't have drivers go to the company who sold you
    the computer with XP x64 and incompatible equipment. They should select it
    to work under x64.

    Sometimes you can use 32bit drivers but the situation changes rapidly every
    month and number of vendors add their support to x64. XP x64 is a working
    system, is god and stable and can be used for very hard tasks. We are just
    buying two two dual processor, dual core workstations based on AMD to be
    used for both office work as well as hard computing in science and
    photoediting under XP x64. The trials with the sample machine coused some
    problems at the beggining but all of them were cused by the lack of our
    knowledge not the system itself and all were solved (except of those with
    failed equipment).

    So, don't worry. I am sure you have a great machine but it only requires
    some of your tuning.
    Best wishes,
    Maciej
    MM, Sep 3, 2005
    #5
  6. Most Office, image editing and other software installs and works at least as
    well under XP64 as on older versions of Windows. Exceptions are where the
    program installs drivers - these must be 64-bit.

    Your problem was not with software. The Linksys program was trying to
    install 32-bit drivers on a 64-bit system which would not accept them.

    See http://www.planetamd64.com/lofiversion/index.php/t9970.html for a
    probable solution to your Linksys driver problem.

    XP64 requires 64-bit drivers for hardware devices. There are relatively few
    users of 64-bit Windows and some manufacturers don't think it worthwhile to
    produce 64-bit drivers yet. However, many proprietary devices use standard
    chipsets for which drivers are available. Research - www.planetamd64.com is
    a good source - will show where this is an option. Check the availability of
    64-bit drivers before buying any new hardware.



    "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    > everything
    > we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    > loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a standard
    > Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    > worked
    > perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze. I
    > tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to load.
    > When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us
    > that
    > XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    > everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but I'm
    > wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working system
    > that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    > videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?
    Dominic Payer, Sep 3, 2005
    #6
  7. dotPhoto wrote:
    > We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with everything
    > we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    > loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a standard
    > Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that worked
    > perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze. I
    > tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to load.
    > When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us that
    > XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    > everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but I'm
    > wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working system
    > that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    > videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?


    dotPhoto,

    First of all, all of the resources you need can be found on the net.
    Read this article here http://www.online64.net/kb.php?mode=article&k=6
    for starters.

    Second, contrary to what MM wrote, NO 32 bit drivers will work on an x64
    OS because all kernel mode drivers that hook into the OS have to be written.

    Third, I have had absolutely no trouble at all with several linksys
    wireless cards. Just find out what chip set you have on the card. It's
    either a Broadcom or an Ralink.

    HTH,

    --
    Steve Thompson
    Online 64 .NET | http://www.online64.net
    Steve Thompson, Sep 3, 2005
    #7
  8. =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=

    Tom Ferguson Guest

    You have to be careful to get peripherals, such as PCI cards like modems
    and Ethernet cards, that have available drivers.

    Also, not all software will work on a 64 bit machine under Windows 64.
    This is especially true of programs that operate at the system level. e.g.
    disk defragmenters, anti-virus software.

    A possible solution for some issues is to dual boot Windows Pro 32 bit and
    the 64 bit version.

    Above all, 64 bit is definitely the future. You are suffering some of the
    start-up pain but the system is so much more capable. Remember, more 64
    bit software is in development. e.g MS Office works well on such systems
    but a native 64 bit version is in development.


    Tom

    "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    : We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    everything
    : we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    : loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a
    standard
    : Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    worked
    : perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze.
    I
    : tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to
    load.
    : When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us
    that
    : XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    : everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but
    I'm
    : wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working
    system
    : that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    : videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?
    Tom Ferguson, Sep 3, 2005
    #8
  9. dotPhoto wrote:
    > We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but I'm
    > wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working system
    > that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    > videos, etc.


    If you mean "suitable for the typical computer user", then no, XP x64 is
    certainly not ready for widespread use. It is a new system, a
    significant share even of new devices has no drivers for it, and even
    worse, there is no certification program. So unless you are a complete
    geek, it is impossible to figure whether a device would be compatible.

    So far the bad news. The good news is that you have absolutely no need
    to use XP x64. Regular XP works just as well, unless you have more than
    4 GB of memory installed. (I know that my dream machine is a dual
    Opteron with as much memory as you can fit, say 16 GB :). So you
    probably got the right computer, but the wrong OS.

    Thomas
    Thomas Steffen, Sep 3, 2005
    #9
  10. =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=

    Gatos Loco Guest

    Dominic is correct by pointing you to planetamd64.com the driver you
    are looking for is there. In fact I am using it right now. At least
    one that works for version 4 of the linksys usb 54g. It's not actually
    a linksys driver but it works with the chipset.

    I haven't really had any problem running x64. I just didn't try to do
    anything to exotic. Even my Wacom tablet works fine.

    32bit drivers will not work though.

    But again, http://planetamd64.com/ is your best bet if you have any
    questions to available drivers, the answers will generally show up
    there first, I have found.

    good luck
    top posting
    gato loco

    On Fri, 2 Sep 2005 23:14:02 -0700, "dotPhoto"
    <> wrote:

    >We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with everything
    >we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    >loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a standard
    >Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that worked
    >perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze. I
    >tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to load.
    >When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us that
    >XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    >everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but I'm
    >wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working system
    >that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    >videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?
    Gatos Loco, Sep 3, 2005
    #10
  11. You mentioned an option of dual boot w/ xp32 along with xp64. How would one
    go about doing this? I have thought of this, my desire would be to keep xp32
    on a separate drive and xp64 on another. Is this possible? Would one still
    be considered slave and primary? Also, I have a problem, my RC2 xp64
    prematurely expired adn now I need to get my files. Can I safely reinstall
    RC2 or the final release trial version over the current xp64 drive in order
    to rescue these files or would they get erased in teh install?

    "Tom Ferguson" wrote:

    > You have to be careful to get peripherals, such as PCI cards like modems
    > and Ethernet cards, that have available drivers.
    >
    > Also, not all software will work on a 64 bit machine under Windows 64.
    > This is especially true of programs that operate at the system level. e.g.
    > disk defragmenters, anti-virus software.
    >
    > A possible solution for some issues is to dual boot Windows Pro 32 bit and
    > the 64 bit version.
    >
    > Above all, 64 bit is definitely the future. You are suffering some of the
    > start-up pain but the system is so much more capable. Remember, more 64
    > bit software is in development. e.g MS Office works well on such systems
    > but a native 64 bit version is in development.
    >
    >
    > Tom
    >
    > "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > : We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    > everything
    > : we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    > : loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a
    > standard
    > : Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    > worked
    > : perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze.
    > I
    > : tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to
    > load.
    > : When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us
    > that
    > : XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    > : everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but
    > I'm
    > : wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working
    > system
    > : that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office, photos,
    > : videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?
    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?dG9ueTIwMjA=?=, Sep 4, 2005
    #11
  12. =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=

    John Barnes Guest

    "tony2020" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > You mentioned an option of dual boot w/ xp32 along with xp64. How would
    > one
    > go about doing this? I have thought of this, my desire would be to keep
    > xp32
    > on a separate drive and xp64 on another. Is this possible?


    Yes, many on this site dual boot

    Would one still
    > be considered slave and primary? On SATA they are Primary channel and
    > secondary channel on the controller on separate cables


    If they are IDE drives, yes

    Also, I have a problem, my RC2 xp64
    > prematurely expired adn now I need to get my files. Can I safely
    > reinstall
    > RC2 or the final release trial version over the current xp64 drive in
    > order
    > to rescue these files or would they get erased in teh install?


    If you are going to dual boot from a second drive, the safest way is to
    install your x86 system on the new drive (it should be installed first
    anyway) and then rescue your files from the RC2 drive, then install the x64
    OEM
    >
    > "Tom Ferguson" wrote:
    >
    >> You have to be careful to get peripherals, such as PCI cards like modems
    >> and Ethernet cards, that have available drivers.
    >>
    >> Also, not all software will work on a 64 bit machine under Windows 64.
    >> This is especially true of programs that operate at the system level.
    >> e.g.
    >> disk defragmenters, anti-virus software.
    >>
    >> A possible solution for some issues is to dual boot Windows Pro 32 bit
    >> and
    >> the 64 bit version.
    >>
    >> Above all, 64 bit is definitely the future. You are suffering some of the
    >> start-up pain but the system is so much more capable. Remember, more 64
    >> bit software is in development. e.g MS Office works well on such systems
    >> but a native 64 bit version is in development.
    >>
    >>
    >> Tom
    >>
    >> "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> : We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    >> everything
    >> : we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    >> : loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a
    >> standard
    >> : Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    >> worked
    >> : perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze.
    >> I
    >> : tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to
    >> load.
    >> : When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us
    >> that
    >> : XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    >> : everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but
    >> I'm
    >> : wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working
    >> system
    >> : that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office,
    >> photos,
    >> : videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    John Barnes, Sep 4, 2005
    #12
  13. Thanks to everyone who offered help.

    I'm going to check out plantetamd64.com, and we'll see if we can get basic
    functionality going.

    If there are any Microsofties or PC sellers out there, here's what I don't
    understand: I've come to expect better from Microsoft out of each successive
    release of Windows operating systems ever since Version 3.1. There has been
    an effort, I think, to ensure backward compatibility, and users like me have
    come to expect increased, not reduced, compability. One person castigated me
    for not doing more investigation before buying this operating system, and
    suggested that perhaps I was not ready for the future. ("The truth! You
    can't handle the truth!")

    It seems to me that if Microsoft is going to release operating systems that
    devolve before they evolve, there should be some warning labels -- especially
    from the PC integrators. When buying from a configurator online, one gets
    the idea that, if you're buying a dual core 64-bit processor, you would be
    best off with the matching "Windows" operating system. Corresponding text
    should note, "Limited peripheral support / click here for a list of supported
    devices / these popular peripherals are not supported at this time" etc.

    Perhaps Microsoft should go back to releasing "Beta" products, so that
    people who have lots of time to spend on these things can break their picks
    on new operating systems.

    I have other questions about XP 64: is it compatible with Windows XP Pro?
    Can 64 control my Pro operating system at the office remotely? Or is XP 64
    hobbled in other ways, too?

    Again, thanks for all the quick and useful feedback. I'll try your
    suggestions.
    =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=, Sep 5, 2005
    #13
  14. I think you've nailed the porblem with the new technology. I've asked
    around in anticipation of building an XP64 machine, and the term "work in
    progress" comes up more often than anything else. There's nothing wrong with
    releasing a new system and letting enthusiasts find their way around it. I
    intend on using the new machine to learn on, not work on. That will come in
    time. But for those who need to get work done, it's not right to sing the
    praises of a new OS and then mention in the little print that "Oh by the
    way, half of your old stuff may not work unless you can hunt down a driver
    that may not even exist." Not a problem if you have another machine to get
    your work done, and the time and inclination to troubleshoot, but not
    everyone is so inclined. The vendors who are pushing these systems should at
    least ask their customers how then intend to use them, and how much time
    they are willing to spend on working out the kinks. For many of us the
    de-kinking is the fun part. For many others....who needs it?


    "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks to everyone who offered help.
    >
    > I'm going to check out plantetamd64.com, and we'll see if we can get basic
    > functionality going.
    >
    > If there are any Microsofties or PC sellers out there, here's what I don't
    > understand: I've come to expect better from Microsoft out of each

    successive
    > release of Windows operating systems ever since Version 3.1. There has

    been
    > an effort, I think, to ensure backward compatibility, and users like me

    have
    > come to expect increased, not reduced, compability. One person castigated

    me
    > for not doing more investigation before buying this operating system, and
    > suggested that perhaps I was not ready for the future. ("The truth! You
    > can't handle the truth!")
    >
    > It seems to me that if Microsoft is going to release operating systems

    that
    > devolve before they evolve, there should be some warning labels --

    especially
    > from the PC integrators. When buying from a configurator online, one gets
    > the idea that, if you're buying a dual core 64-bit processor, you would be
    > best off with the matching "Windows" operating system. Corresponding text
    > should note, "Limited peripheral support / click here for a list of

    supported
    > devices / these popular peripherals are not supported at this time" etc.
    >
    > Perhaps Microsoft should go back to releasing "Beta" products, so that
    > people who have lots of time to spend on these things can break their

    picks
    > on new operating systems.
    >
    > I have other questions about XP 64: is it compatible with Windows XP Pro?
    > Can 64 control my Pro operating system at the office remotely? Or is XP

    64
    > hobbled in other ways, too?
    >
    > Again, thanks for all the quick and useful feedback. I'll try your
    > suggestions.
    Dennis Gordon, Sep 5, 2005
    #14
  15. So, to clarify this dual boot installation. I'll be adding a new drive
    (IDE), which I should make my primary drive for xp32? (should I leave the
    current xp64 drive disconnected when installing the xp32 drive?) Then I
    should make my current drive (also IDE) with the xp64 the slave to this? So,
    xp32 will allow me to access the xp64 folders to get my files? Then once
    that is done, I would just reinstall RC2 or the trial xp64? I understand xp
    will auto setup the dual boot, the question I have is when I turn the PC on,
    will I be prompted as to which version to boot to, or will I be selecting an
    "F" key, and if so which one?

    "John Barnes" wrote:

    >
    > "tony2020" <> wrote in message
    > news:D...
    > > You mentioned an option of dual boot w/ xp32 along with xp64. How would
    > > one
    > > go about doing this? I have thought of this, my desire would be to keep
    > > xp32
    > > on a separate drive and xp64 on another. Is this possible?

    >
    > Yes, many on this site dual boot
    >
    > Would one still
    > > be considered slave and primary? On SATA they are Primary channel and
    > > secondary channel on the controller on separate cables

    >
    > If they are IDE drives, yes
    >
    > Also, I have a problem, my RC2 xp64
    > > prematurely expired adn now I need to get my files. Can I safely
    > > reinstall
    > > RC2 or the final release trial version over the current xp64 drive in
    > > order
    > > to rescue these files or would they get erased in teh install?

    >
    > If you are going to dual boot from a second drive, the safest way is to
    > install your x86 system on the new drive (it should be installed first
    > anyway) and then rescue your files from the RC2 drive, then install the x64
    > OEM
    > >
    > > "Tom Ferguson" wrote:
    > >
    > >> You have to be careful to get peripherals, such as PCI cards like modems
    > >> and Ethernet cards, that have available drivers.
    > >>
    > >> Also, not all software will work on a 64 bit machine under Windows 64.
    > >> This is especially true of programs that operate at the system level.
    > >> e.g.
    > >> disk defragmenters, anti-virus software.
    > >>
    > >> A possible solution for some issues is to dual boot Windows Pro 32 bit
    > >> and
    > >> the 64 bit version.
    > >>
    > >> Above all, 64 bit is definitely the future. You are suffering some of the
    > >> start-up pain but the system is so much more capable. Remember, more 64
    > >> bit software is in development. e.g MS Office works well on such systems
    > >> but a native 64 bit version is in development.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Tom
    > >>
    > >> "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> : We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    > >> everything
    > >> : we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that simply
    > >> : loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a
    > >> standard
    > >> : Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    > >> worked
    > >> : perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then froze.
    > >> I
    > >> : tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to
    > >> load.
    > >> : When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told us
    > >> that
    > >> : XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible with
    > >> : everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer, but
    > >> I'm
    > >> : wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working
    > >> system
    > >> : that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office,
    > >> photos,
    > >> : videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP 64?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?dG9ueTIwMjA=?=, Sep 5, 2005
    #15
  16. =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=

    John Barnes Guest

    Doesn't matter which is the primary or secondary and no need to disconnect
    during the install, just be real careful when you are selecting what to
    partition and format that you select the empty space on the new drive. When
    you install the new x64 you will be prompted at bootup which system you want
    to boot to. The x64 will be the default since it will be installed last and
    the default seconds will be 30 but you will probably want to change that to
    less using system properties after you are done.


    "tony2020" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > So, to clarify this dual boot installation. I'll be adding a new drive
    > (IDE), which I should make my primary drive for xp32? (should I leave the
    > current xp64 drive disconnected when installing the xp32 drive?) Then I
    > should make my current drive (also IDE) with the xp64 the slave to this?
    > So,
    > xp32 will allow me to access the xp64 folders to get my files? Then once
    > that is done, I would just reinstall RC2 or the trial xp64? I understand
    > xp
    > will auto setup the dual boot, the question I have is when I turn the PC
    > on,
    > will I be prompted as to which version to boot to, or will I be selecting
    > an
    > "F" key, and if so which one?
    >
    > "John Barnes" wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "tony2020" <> wrote in message
    >> news:D...
    >> > You mentioned an option of dual boot w/ xp32 along with xp64. How
    >> > would
    >> > one
    >> > go about doing this? I have thought of this, my desire would be to keep
    >> > xp32
    >> > on a separate drive and xp64 on another. Is this possible?

    >>
    >> Yes, many on this site dual boot
    >>
    >> Would one still
    >> > be considered slave and primary? On SATA they are Primary channel and
    >> > secondary channel on the controller on separate cables

    >>
    >> If they are IDE drives, yes
    >>
    >> Also, I have a problem, my RC2 xp64
    >> > prematurely expired adn now I need to get my files. Can I safely
    >> > reinstall
    >> > RC2 or the final release trial version over the current xp64 drive in
    >> > order
    >> > to rescue these files or would they get erased in teh install?

    >>
    >> If you are going to dual boot from a second drive, the safest way is to
    >> install your x86 system on the new drive (it should be installed first
    >> anyway) and then rescue your files from the RC2 drive, then install the
    >> x64
    >> OEM
    >> >
    >> > "Tom Ferguson" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> You have to be careful to get peripherals, such as PCI cards like
    >> >> modems
    >> >> and Ethernet cards, that have available drivers.
    >> >>
    >> >> Also, not all software will work on a 64 bit machine under Windows 64.
    >> >> This is especially true of programs that operate at the system level.
    >> >> e.g.
    >> >> disk defragmenters, anti-virus software.
    >> >>
    >> >> A possible solution for some issues is to dual boot Windows Pro 32 bit
    >> >> and
    >> >> the 64 bit version.
    >> >>
    >> >> Above all, 64 bit is definitely the future. You are suffering some of
    >> >> the
    >> >> start-up pain but the system is so much more capable. Remember, more
    >> >> 64
    >> >> bit software is in development. e.g MS Office works well on such
    >> >> systems
    >> >> but a native 64 bit version is in development.
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> Tom
    >> >>
    >> >> "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    >> >> news:...
    >> >> : We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    >> >> everything
    >> >> : we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that
    >> >> simply
    >> >> : loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a
    >> >> standard
    >> >> : Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    >> >> worked
    >> >> : perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then
    >> >> froze.
    >> >> I
    >> >> : tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to
    >> >> load.
    >> >> : When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told
    >> >> us
    >> >> that
    >> >> : XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible
    >> >> with
    >> >> : everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer,
    >> >> but
    >> >> I'm
    >> >> : wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working
    >> >> system
    >> >> : that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office,
    >> >> photos,
    >> >> : videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP
    >> >> 64?
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    John Barnes, Sep 6, 2005
    #16
  17. =?Utf-8?B?ZG90UGhvdG8=?=

    Torrey Lauer Guest

    The problem isn't Microsoft. Microsoft developed, tested, and released a
    great OS. The problem is with the other software companies that didn't
    realize that 64 bit computing was going to happen so fast. So, those
    software companies didn't do anything to get 64 bit drivers for their
    equipement ready.

    You will find, however, most drivers for your new dream machine. There are
    several sites that I have used recently to get drivers. Keep in mind that a
    beta driver may work better than an actual released driver. This happened
    to me with a graphics driver.

    The only driver I could not find was a 64 bit driver for the modem. That
    was not critial to me at all since I never use a modem. I always use
    wireless or ethernet port.

    Post back as to whether you have a Broadcom wireless adapter or a Ralink.
    Then, someone here can post a link to a site that has the driver you will
    need.

    --
    Torrey Lauer
    Modern Travel Services
    moderntravel DOT net

    Rainbow Sky Travel
    rainbow sky travel DOT net
    "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks to everyone who offered help.
    >
    > I'm going to check out plantetamd64.com, and we'll see if we can get basic
    > functionality going.
    >
    > If there are any Microsofties or PC sellers out there, here's what I don't
    > understand: I've come to expect better from Microsoft out of each
    > successive
    > release of Windows operating systems ever since Version 3.1. There has
    > been
    > an effort, I think, to ensure backward compatibility, and users like me
    > have
    > come to expect increased, not reduced, compability. One person castigated
    > me
    > for not doing more investigation before buying this operating system, and
    > suggested that perhaps I was not ready for the future. ("The truth! You
    > can't handle the truth!")
    >
    > It seems to me that if Microsoft is going to release operating systems
    > that
    > devolve before they evolve, there should be some warning labels --
    > especially
    > from the PC integrators. When buying from a configurator online, one gets
    > the idea that, if you're buying a dual core 64-bit processor, you would be
    > best off with the matching "Windows" operating system. Corresponding text
    > should note, "Limited peripheral support / click here for a list of
    > supported
    > devices / these popular peripherals are not supported at this time" etc.
    >
    > Perhaps Microsoft should go back to releasing "Beta" products, so that
    > people who have lots of time to spend on these things can break their
    > picks
    > on new operating systems.
    >
    > I have other questions about XP 64: is it compatible with Windows XP Pro?
    > Can 64 control my Pro operating system at the office remotely? Or is XP
    > 64
    > hobbled in other ways, too?
    >
    > Again, thanks for all the quick and useful feedback. I'll try your
    > suggestions.
    Torrey Lauer, Sep 6, 2005
    #17
  18. I first installed the xp32 Home on primary IDE, which shows up as F drive in
    "my computer". The slave drive that I want to put xp64 Trial on shows as C
    drive when I am booted to the xp32. I then booted from cd (xp64 trial disc)
    and was shown drives C and D, choose one for this install. Here, at the blue
    partition screen, I chose D,which I'm figuring is the Slave drive, to
    install 64. I formatted it to NTFS (as I did the other drive). It goes
    through all the motions to install, but when it does its first auto reboot
    during setup, it doesn't seem to get past this and starts setup all over
    again. I have the bios set to boot the xp32 drive first which allows a
    normal bootup. However, if I set bios to boot the other drive, nothing
    happens, no option for which OS I want to boot to (as I presume if never
    finished installing). So, the question, is what is not going right in
    installing xp64 for the dual boot scenario? and why do the drive letters
    show primary as F? (D and E are cdrw and dvdR)

    "John Barnes" wrote:

    > Doesn't matter which is the primary or secondary and no need to disconnect
    > during the install, just be real careful when you are selecting what to
    > partition and format that you select the empty space on the new drive. When
    > you install the new x64 you will be prompted at bootup which system you want
    > to boot to. The x64 will be the default since it will be installed last and
    > the default seconds will be 30 but you will probably want to change that to
    > less using system properties after you are done.
    >
    >
    > "tony2020" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > So, to clarify this dual boot installation. I'll be adding a new drive
    > > (IDE), which I should make my primary drive for xp32? (should I leave the
    > > current xp64 drive disconnected when installing the xp32 drive?) Then I
    > > should make my current drive (also IDE) with the xp64 the slave to this?
    > > So,
    > > xp32 will allow me to access the xp64 folders to get my files? Then once
    > > that is done, I would just reinstall RC2 or the trial xp64? I understand
    > > xp
    > > will auto setup the dual boot, the question I have is when I turn the PC
    > > on,
    > > will I be prompted as to which version to boot to, or will I be selecting
    > > an
    > > "F" key, and if so which one?
    > >
    > > "John Barnes" wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >> "tony2020" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:D...
    > >> > You mentioned an option of dual boot w/ xp32 along with xp64. How
    > >> > would
    > >> > one
    > >> > go about doing this? I have thought of this, my desire would be to keep
    > >> > xp32
    > >> > on a separate drive and xp64 on another. Is this possible?
    > >>
    > >> Yes, many on this site dual boot
    > >>
    > >> Would one still
    > >> > be considered slave and primary? On SATA they are Primary channel and
    > >> > secondary channel on the controller on separate cables
    > >>
    > >> If they are IDE drives, yes
    > >>
    > >> Also, I have a problem, my RC2 xp64
    > >> > prematurely expired adn now I need to get my files. Can I safely
    > >> > reinstall
    > >> > RC2 or the final release trial version over the current xp64 drive in
    > >> > order
    > >> > to rescue these files or would they get erased in teh install?
    > >>
    > >> If you are going to dual boot from a second drive, the safest way is to
    > >> install your x86 system on the new drive (it should be installed first
    > >> anyway) and then rescue your files from the RC2 drive, then install the
    > >> x64
    > >> OEM
    > >> >
    > >> > "Tom Ferguson" wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> You have to be careful to get peripherals, such as PCI cards like
    > >> >> modems
    > >> >> and Ethernet cards, that have available drivers.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Also, not all software will work on a 64 bit machine under Windows 64.
    > >> >> This is especially true of programs that operate at the system level.
    > >> >> e.g.
    > >> >> disk defragmenters, anti-virus software.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> A possible solution for some issues is to dual boot Windows Pro 32 bit
    > >> >> and
    > >> >> the 64 bit version.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Above all, 64 bit is definitely the future. You are suffering some of
    > >> >> the
    > >> >> start-up pain but the system is so much more capable. Remember, more
    > >> >> 64
    > >> >> bit software is in development. e.g MS Office works well on such
    > >> >> systems
    > >> >> but a native 64 bit version is in development.
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Tom
    > >> >>
    > >> >> "dotPhoto" <> wrote in message
    > >> >> news:...
    > >> >> : We just bought our dream machine -- an AMD Athlon dual core with
    > >> >> everything
    > >> >> : we could imagine including XP 64. Unfortunately, we found that
    > >> >> simply
    > >> >> : loading software on the computer was impossible. For instance, a
    > >> >> standard
    > >> >> : Linksys USB wireless G device that we bought two months ago and that
    > >> >> worked
    > >> >> : perfectly on the predecssor got to 25% load on install and then
    > >> >> froze.
    > >> >> I
    > >> >> : tried everything -- Safe Mode, etc. -- and still could not get it to
    > >> >> load.
    > >> >> : When we finally got through to the company's tech support, they told
    > >> >> us
    > >> >> that
    > >> >> : XP 64 was "for the future" and that it was basically incompatible
    > >> >> with
    > >> >> : everything today. We're thinking that we'll return this computer,
    > >> >> but
    > >> >> I'm
    > >> >> : wondering if anyone at Microsoft can tell me if XP 64 is a working
    > >> >> system
    > >> >> : that could be useful today to someone who does the usual Office,
    > >> >> photos,
    > >> >> : videos, etc. If so, what would I need to do to load software on XP
    > >> >> 64?
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?dG9ueTIwMjA=?=, Sep 21, 2005
    #18
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. =?Utf-8?B?cnlhbiBt?=

    can't install anything because its not 64 compatible

    =?Utf-8?B?cnlhbiBt?=, Jan 6, 2007, in forum: Windows 64bit
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    363
    Bruce Chambers
    Jan 6, 2007
  2. BP
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,099
    PhilSweet
    Dec 19, 2008
  3. Homer J. Simpson
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    743
    Jim Barry
    Jan 19, 2009
  4. David B.
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    475
    David B.
    Jan 20, 2009
  5. Lanwench [MVP - Exchange]
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    421
    Lanwench [MVP - Exchange]
    Jan 21, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page