IP address

Discussion in 'MCSA' started by senseofhumor13, Feb 26, 2004.

  1. senseofhumor13

    kpg Guest

    > I don't quite understand how I would come up with the IP
    > address on my own, please explain.


    The nature of your question indicates that you are very early
    on in your training. You need to understand what an IP
    address is and how it is used in a TCP network then you will
    know how to _get_ one.

    Further reading is advised.

    kpg
     
    kpg, Feb 27, 2004
    #21
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  2. senseofhumor13

    LnkWizard Guest

    If you have built your own network, then you control the IP
    addresses. As such you decide what the static IP address
    will be.

    For example, here is a network with the following equipment.
    2 - 2003 Advanced Servers acting as Domain Controllers (DC1 and 2)
    and DNS servers
    1 - 2003 Advanced Server acting as a file server (FS)
    1 - Desktop Workstation
    1 - Laptop Workstation with wireless 802.11b capability
    1 - Cable modem router providing DHCP services
    1 - Print server PS

    Since you are developing the network you decide to configure it
    as Class C using the usual 192.168.1.x IP address setup.

    Each DC needs a static IP since they are also DNS servers. To be consistent
    lets also
    assign the file and print servers static IP addresses also.
    So lets assign DC1 and IP address of 192.168.1.200
    DC2 gets 192.168.1.201
    Next FS gets 192.168.1.210 (lets leave some space for other servers)
    Finally PS gets 192.168.1.240 (again more room for other equipment)

    All the servers are connected to the router with an 8 port hub. Here you
    have developed
    the IP addresses for each of your servers.

    The workstation and laptop still use DHCP for their address and connect
    directly
    to the router.

    Now the router uses DHCP itself to get an IP address from your ISP
    and uses its internal DHCP to hand out addresses to the internal network.
    It also assigns itself the IP address 192.168.1.1 so that it can communicate
    on the internal network. If you want to use a fixed IP address to connect
    to your ISP you will need to get on from them for the router. Also you need
    to configure your router so that it will not hand out any IP addresses
    greater than
    192.168.1.199 or lower than 192.168.1.2.

    Lets say the ISP assigns address 68.50.5.132 either via
    DHCP or you enter it as a static address after asking them for it.

    An example of the address route to the workstation would then be:
    ISP to the router at ISP assigned address 68.50.05.132 on the router
    Internally we go through the router from IP address 68.50.05.132 to
    the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.1
    From Router address 192.168.1.1 across the internal network to
    the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.200 on DC1.


    If we went from the ISP to DC1 it would be:
    ISP to the router at ISP assigned address 68.50.05.132 on the router
    Internally we go through the router from IP address 68.50.05.132 to
    the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.1
    From Router address 192.168.1.1 across the internal network to
    static IP address 192.168.1.200 on DC1.

    Hopefully that helps and my explanation hasn't confused things further,
    I just wish I had a way of showing this with pictures also.
    --
    Alan G
    "He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ---


    "senseofhumor13" <> wrote in message
    news:073d01c3fd4f$f53e2440$...
    > I don't quite understand how I would come up with the IP
    > address on my own, please explain.
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > ><> wrote in message
    > >news:00ce01c3fcc4$27d7f5c0$...
    > >> So, where would I get the static IP from?

    > >
    > >Probably the ISP or SysAdmin if connecting to another's

    > network.
    > >However, if you are running your own network, then you

    > come up
    > >with it yourself.
    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >
     
    LnkWizard, Feb 27, 2004
    #22
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  3. senseofhumor13

    kpg Guest

    I didn't understand that explanation.
     
    kpg, Feb 27, 2004
    #23
  4. senseofhumor13

    ME Guest

    ALL RIGHT YOU GUYS.

    Don't give senseofhumor13 hard time.
    Here's correct ans: call USPS for the address.

    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:uXGVyrV$...
    > I didn't understand that explanation.
    >
    >
     
    ME, Feb 27, 2004
    #24
  5. senseofhumor13

    kpg Guest

    Thats fine, but what if the server were in the UK?
    Then it would be the Royal Mail Group.

    "ME" <> wrote in message
    news:uFKdfJW$...
    > ALL RIGHT YOU GUYS.
    >
    > Don't give senseofhumor13 hard time.
    > Here's correct ans: call USPS for the address.
    >
    > "kpg" <> wrote in message
    > news:uXGVyrV$...
    > > I didn't understand that explanation.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    kpg, Feb 27, 2004
    #25
  6. senseofhumor13

    LnkWizard Guest

    Seriously, was it that bad?

    --
    Alan G
    "He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ---


    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:uXGVyrV$...
    > I didn't understand that explanation.
    >
    >
     
    LnkWizard, Feb 27, 2004
    #26
  7. senseofhumor13

    Ken Briscoe Guest

    > Thats fine, but what if the server were in the UK?
    > Then it would be the Royal Mail Group.


    No. Brits aren't allowed to have IP addresses. Check the Geneva Convention.
    No war crimes. No IPs.

    --

    KB - MCNGP "silent thug" #26

    first initial last name AT hotmail DOT com
     
    Ken Briscoe, Feb 27, 2004
    #27
  8. senseofhumor13

    kpg Guest

    > Seriously, was it that bad?

    YES.

    After re-reading it's OK, but not for a beginner.
    A bit overkill.
     
    kpg, Feb 27, 2004
    #28
  9. senseofhumor13

    LnkWizard Guest

    Eventually I'll find a happy medium I guess.

    --
    Alan G
    "He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ---


    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:eesZ6mW$...
    > > Seriously, was it that bad?

    >
    > YES.
    >
    > After re-reading it's OK, but not for a beginner.
    > A bit overkill.
    >
    >
     
    LnkWizard, Feb 27, 2004
    #29
  10. senseofhumor13

    JaR Guest

    LnkWizard opined, On 2/27/04 12:25 PM:

    > Eventually I'll find a happy medium I guess.
    >


    Definition of a psychic on prozac
     
    JaR, Feb 27, 2004
    #30
  11. senseofhumor13

    LnkWizard Guest

    Dang, how'd you find out? I thought I was keeping that hidden.

    --
    Alan G
    "He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ---


    "JaR" <> wrote in message
    news:evdFEDX$...
    > LnkWizard opined, On 2/27/04 12:25 PM:
    >
    > > Eventually I'll find a happy medium I guess.
    > >

    >
    > Definition of a psychic on prozac
     
    LnkWizard, Feb 27, 2004
    #31
  12. Thanks for the well thoughtout explanation.
    Unfortunately, none of it sticks to my brain. In case I
    haven't made it evidently clear, I'm very new to the
    computer world. I've been learning about computers for
    the past 6 months or so. Other than the computer repair
    class and a windows 2000 pro class (which I'm taking
    now), I have no other experience. I'm going to print your
    posting and will look at it periodically. It looks
    interesting, I just wish it was in english.

    Thanks
    >-----Original Message-----
    >If you have built your own network, then you control the

    IP
    >addresses. As such you decide what the static IP address
    >will be.
    >
    >For example, here is a network with the following

    equipment.
    >2 - 2003 Advanced Servers acting as Domain Controllers

    (DC1 and 2)
    > and DNS servers
    >1 - 2003 Advanced Server acting as a file server (FS)
    >1 - Desktop Workstation
    >1 - Laptop Workstation with wireless 802.11b capability
    >1 - Cable modem router providing DHCP services
    >1 - Print server PS
    >
    >Since you are developing the network you decide to

    configure it
    >as Class C using the usual 192.168.1.x IP address setup.
    >
    >Each DC needs a static IP since they are also DNS

    servers. To be consistent
    >lets also
    >assign the file and print servers static IP addresses

    also.
    > So lets assign DC1 and IP address of 192.168.1.200
    > DC2 gets 192.168.1.201
    > Next FS gets 192.168.1.210 (lets leave some space

    for other servers)
    > Finally PS gets 192.168.1.240 (again more room for

    other equipment)
    >
    >All the servers are connected to the router with an 8

    port hub. Here you
    >have developed
    >the IP addresses for each of your servers.
    >
    >The workstation and laptop still use DHCP for their

    address and connect
    >directly
    >to the router.
    >
    >Now the router uses DHCP itself to get an IP address

    from your ISP
    >and uses its internal DHCP to hand out addresses to the

    internal network.
    >It also assigns itself the IP address 192.168.1.1 so

    that it can communicate
    >on the internal network. If you want to use a fixed IP

    address to connect
    >to your ISP you will need to get on from them for the

    router. Also you need
    >to configure your router so that it will not hand out

    any IP addresses
    >greater than
    >192.168.1.199 or lower than 192.168.1.2.
    >
    >Lets say the ISP assigns address 68.50.5.132 either via
    >DHCP or you enter it as a static address after asking

    them for it.
    >
    >An example of the address route to the workstation would

    then be:
    >ISP to the router at ISP assigned address 68.50.05.132

    on the router
    >Internally we go through the router from IP address

    68.50.05.132 to
    > the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.1
    >From Router address 192.168.1.1 across the internal

    network to
    > the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.200 on DC1.
    >
    >
    >If we went from the ISP to DC1 it would be:
    >ISP to the router at ISP assigned address 68.50.05.132

    on the router
    >Internally we go through the router from IP address

    68.50.05.132 to
    > the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.1
    >From Router address 192.168.1.1 across the internal

    network to
    > static IP address 192.168.1.200 on DC1.
    >
    >Hopefully that helps and my explanation hasn't confused

    things further,
    >I just wish I had a way of showing this with pictures

    also.
    >--
    >Alan G
    >"He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"
    >---------------------------------------------------------

    -------------------
    >---
    >
    >
    >"senseofhumor13" <>

    wrote in message
    >news:073d01c3fd4f$f53e2440$...
    >> I don't quite understand how I would come up with the

    IP
    >> address on my own, please explain.
    >> >-----Original Message-----
    >> ><> wrote in message
    >> >news:00ce01c3fcc4$27d7f5c0$...
    >> >> So, where would I get the static IP from?
    >> >
    >> >Probably the ISP or SysAdmin if connecting to

    another's
    >> network.
    >> >However, if you are running your own network, then you

    >> come up
    >> >with it yourself.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >.
    >> >

    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    senseofhumor13, Feb 27, 2004
    #32
  13. What's your definition of "hard time"?

    I called USPS...Newman answered, so I hung up. I called
    again and Cliffy answered. Damn, I can't get a break.
    >-----Original Message-----
    >ALL RIGHT YOU GUYS.
    >
    >Don't give senseofhumor13 hard time.
    >Here's correct ans: call USPS for the address.
    >
    >"kpg" <> wrote in message
    >news:uXGVyrV$...
    >> I didn't understand that explanation.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    senseofhumor13, Feb 27, 2004
    #33
  14. Is RTFM anything like TGIF? Confused, please explain.

    >-----Original Message-----
    >senseofhumor13 opined, On 2/27/04 8:37 AM:
    >
    >> I don't quite understand how I would come up with the

    IP
    >> address on my own, please explain.
    >>

    >
    >Ferchrissakes, bud! RTFM!
    >
    >JaR
    >Elementary Thug
    >.
    >
     
    senseofhumor13, Feb 27, 2004
    #34
  15. senseofhumor13

    JaR Guest

    senseofhumor13 opined, On 2/27/04 3:11 PM:
    > Is RTFM anything like TGIF? Confused, please explain.
    >


    Read The Fscking Manual
     
    JaR, Feb 27, 2004
    #35
  16. senseofhumor13

    ME Guest

    feel sorry for you.:-(
    you can check out http://usps.com/postalinspectors/
    last time I released my address and couldn't get the same address. I
    contacted people at this site and they gave me back my old address plus one
    more for backup.


    "senseofhumor13" <> wrote in message
    news:363a01c3fd86$c836b7a0$...
    > What's your definition of "hard time"?
    >
    > I called USPS...Newman answered, so I hung up. I called
    > again and Cliffy answered. Damn, I can't get a break.
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >ALL RIGHT YOU GUYS.
    > >
    > >Don't give senseofhumor13 hard time.
    > >Here's correct ans: call USPS for the address.
    > >
    > >"kpg" <> wrote in message
    > >news:uXGVyrV$...
    > >> I didn't understand that explanation.
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >
     
    ME, Feb 27, 2004
    #36
  17. senseofhumor13

    Brat Guest

    lol I cant believe I am doing this... but give the kid a break... he is new
    but he is also very willing to learn and research information. I have had a
    few intelligent conversations with him before. However, Rick (?- sorry for
    the memory loss soh13), JaR is right too... you do need to read up more in
    your text books.

    I think what happened here was too much information too quickly and he got a
    brain overload...

    --
    Sue MCNGP #69

    "JaR" <> wrote in message
    news:eN9NTTV$...
    > senseofhumor13 opined, On 2/27/04 8:37 AM:
    >
    > > I don't quite understand how I would come up with the IP
    > > address on my own, please explain.
    > >

    >
    > Ferchrissakes, bud! RTFM!
    >
    > JaR
    > Elementary Thug
     
    Brat, Feb 27, 2004
    #37
  18. Thanks for coming to my defense Brat but I don't take
    their criticisms or taunting seriously. I know I have a
    lot to learn and often, I don't quite understand what's
    obvious to you guys. I don't even mind the laughter at my
    expense. In fact, I'd sort of expected it. Besides, some
    of the guys are actually pretty helpful.
    >-----Original Message-----
    >lol I cant believe I am doing this... but give the kid a

    break... he is new
    >but he is also very willing to learn and research

    information. I have had a
    >few intelligent conversations with him before. However,

    Rick (?- sorry for
    >the memory loss soh13), JaR is right too... you do need

    to read up more in
    >your text books.
    >
    >I think what happened here was too much information too

    quickly and he got a
    >brain overload...
    >
    >--
    >Sue MCNGP #69
    >
    >"JaR" <> wrote in message
    >news:eN9NTTV$...
    >> senseofhumor13 opined, On 2/27/04 8:37 AM:
    >>
    >> > I don't quite understand how I would come up with

    the IP
    >> > address on my own, please explain.
    >> >

    >>
    >> Ferchrissakes, bud! RTFM!
    >>
    >> JaR
    >> Elementary Thug

    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    senseofhumor13, Feb 28, 2004
    #38
  19. Thanks for the advise. Of course, I will read further but
    sometimes, it's just easier to ask. Was my question that
    lame?
    >-----Original Message-----
    >> I don't quite understand how I would come up with the

    IP
    >> address on my own, please explain.

    >
    >The nature of your question indicates that you are very

    early
    >on in your training. You need to understand what an IP
    >address is and how it is used in a TCP network then you

    will
    >know how to _get_ one.
    >
    >Further reading is advised.
    >
    >kpg
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    senseofhumor13, Feb 28, 2004
    #39
  20. senseofhumor13

    LnkWizard Guest

    I do apologize for that, I didn't realize that you were that new to network
    computing.
    Your best bet is to pick up a beginners book on TCP/IP, and one on basic
    networking. Ziff Davis Publishing has some nice ones or, and please don't
    take
    this the wrong way, the "For Dummy's" series is also quite nice.
    I used the "TCP/IP for Dummies" book to help me write a mid-term paper in
    college, it got me an "A". After reading the books my explanation will
    clear up somewhat I hope. If not, I will be glad to try and explain it
    better.

    Again, I am sorry, and will try to keep your newness to computing in mind
    if I get the opportunity to answer further questions.
    --
    Alan G
    "He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ---


    "senseofhumor13" <> wrote in message
    news:3a0e01c3fd86$26751c40$...
    > Thanks for the well thoughtout explanation.
    > Unfortunately, none of it sticks to my brain. In case I
    > haven't made it evidently clear, I'm very new to the
    > computer world. I've been learning about computers for
    > the past 6 months or so. Other than the computer repair
    > class and a windows 2000 pro class (which I'm taking
    > now), I have no other experience. I'm going to print your
    > posting and will look at it periodically. It looks
    > interesting, I just wish it was in english.
    >
    > Thanks
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >If you have built your own network, then you control the

    > IP
    > >addresses. As such you decide what the static IP address
    > >will be.
    > >
    > >For example, here is a network with the following

    > equipment.
    > >2 - 2003 Advanced Servers acting as Domain Controllers

    > (DC1 and 2)
    > > and DNS servers
    > >1 - 2003 Advanced Server acting as a file server (FS)
    > >1 - Desktop Workstation
    > >1 - Laptop Workstation with wireless 802.11b capability
    > >1 - Cable modem router providing DHCP services
    > >1 - Print server PS
    > >
    > >Since you are developing the network you decide to

    > configure it
    > >as Class C using the usual 192.168.1.x IP address setup.
    > >
    > >Each DC needs a static IP since they are also DNS

    > servers. To be consistent
    > >lets also
    > >assign the file and print servers static IP addresses

    > also.
    > > So lets assign DC1 and IP address of 192.168.1.200
    > > DC2 gets 192.168.1.201
    > > Next FS gets 192.168.1.210 (lets leave some space

    > for other servers)
    > > Finally PS gets 192.168.1.240 (again more room for

    > other equipment)
    > >
    > >All the servers are connected to the router with an 8

    > port hub. Here you
    > >have developed
    > >the IP addresses for each of your servers.
    > >
    > >The workstation and laptop still use DHCP for their

    > address and connect
    > >directly
    > >to the router.
    > >
    > >Now the router uses DHCP itself to get an IP address

    > from your ISP
    > >and uses its internal DHCP to hand out addresses to the

    > internal network.
    > >It also assigns itself the IP address 192.168.1.1 so

    > that it can communicate
    > >on the internal network. If you want to use a fixed IP

    > address to connect
    > >to your ISP you will need to get on from them for the

    > router. Also you need
    > >to configure your router so that it will not hand out

    > any IP addresses
    > >greater than
    > >192.168.1.199 or lower than 192.168.1.2.
    > >
    > >Lets say the ISP assigns address 68.50.5.132 either via
    > >DHCP or you enter it as a static address after asking

    > them for it.
    > >
    > >An example of the address route to the workstation would

    > then be:
    > >ISP to the router at ISP assigned address 68.50.05.132

    > on the router
    > >Internally we go through the router from IP address

    > 68.50.05.132 to
    > > the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.1
    > >From Router address 192.168.1.1 across the internal

    > network to
    > > the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.200 on DC1.
    > >
    > >
    > >If we went from the ISP to DC1 it would be:
    > >ISP to the router at ISP assigned address 68.50.05.132

    > on the router
    > >Internally we go through the router from IP address

    > 68.50.05.132 to
    > > the router assigned IP address 192.168.1.1
    > >From Router address 192.168.1.1 across the internal

    > network to
    > > static IP address 192.168.1.200 on DC1.
    > >
    > >Hopefully that helps and my explanation hasn't confused

    > things further,
    > >I just wish I had a way of showing this with pictures

    > also.
    > >--
    > >Alan G
    > >"He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"
    > >---------------------------------------------------------

    > -------------------
    > >---
    > >
    > >
    > >"senseofhumor13" <>

    > wrote in message
    > >news:073d01c3fd4f$f53e2440$...
    > >> I don't quite understand how I would come up with the

    > IP
    > >> address on my own, please explain.
    > >> >-----Original Message-----
    > >> ><> wrote in message
    > >> >news:00ce01c3fcc4$27d7f5c0$...
    > >> >> So, where would I get the static IP from?
    > >> >
    > >> >Probably the ISP or SysAdmin if connecting to

    > another's
    > >> network.
    > >> >However, if you are running your own network, then you
    > >> come up
    > >> >with it yourself.
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >.
    > >> >

    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >
     
    LnkWizard, Mar 1, 2004
    #40
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