IP Address Questions

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Aug 18, 2007.

  1. Luke O'Malley wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > Perhaps you can help. I have three computers and they are attached
    > to a router. Do they all have the same IP address? If someone
    > hooked onto my wireless system would they have the same IP address?


    No, and no. No two devices can have the same IP address, otherwise it
    simply no workee. Most routers hand out private IP addresses that are
    something like 192.168.0.2 or some variation. If someone else attaches
    to your network, they'll need a unique IP address to function. Want to
    explain in more detail what you think is going on?
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Aug 18, 2007
    #1
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  2. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    Mr. Arnold Guest

    "Luke O'Malley" <> wrote in message
    news:zsCxi.27$...
    > Hi
    >
    > Perhaps you can help. I have three computers and they are attached
    > to a router. Do they all have the same IP address? If someone
    > hooked onto my wireless system would they have the same IP address?
    >


    Your router has a DHCP server. Your computer is automatically requesting a
    DHCP IP from a DHCP server. I network whether that be your home network,
    your company's network or your ISP's network is using DHCP IP(s) and they
    have a DHCP server on the network.

    You computer's settings are default configured to obtain an IP
    automatically. If you look at the NIC or Network Interface Card whether it
    be Ethernet/wire or a wireless NIC, the default is the setting. You can also
    configure a computer wired or wireless to use a static IP on the router as
    well, which you'll have to do it manually.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_Host_Configuration_Protocol
     
    Mr. Arnold, Aug 18, 2007
    #2
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  3. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    Mike Easter Guest

    Luke O'Malley wrote:

    > Perhaps you can help. I have three computers and they are attached
    > to a router. Do they all have the same IP address? If someone
    > hooked onto my wireless system would they have the same IP address?


    The typical router/LAN configuration is that the router gets/has an IP
    address which is associated with its WAN connectivity, such as
    67.80.251.169 which it gets from the cable or dsl which is communicating
    with the WAN/internet.

    Your 3 computers are assigned 'internal' IP addresses by the router such
    as 192.168.1.145 and other 192.168.1.xxx or 192.168.xx.xxx IP and the
    router keeps up with which computer is which.

    Then, when each of the 3 LAN computers makes a request of a webserver,
    say, the request goes from a computer 192.168.1.145 thru' the router
    which transmits the request as 67.80.251.169 to the WAN and when the
    webserver on the internet answers to 67.80.251.169, the router passes
    the information on to the computer 192.168.1.145 which made the request.

    The router acts as a NAT device, network address translator, translating
    the IP address to enable each computer on the LAN to have its own
    internal address while the LAN itself has only a single IP address.

    If someone hooks onto your wireless system, they will have your
    67.80.251.169 IP address as far as the WAN is concerned, but they will
    have their own IP address as far as the router and the LAN is concerned,
    such as 192.168.1.101.


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Aug 18, 2007
    #3
  4. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2007-08-18, Luke O'Malley <> wrote:
    >
    > Hi
    >
    > Perhaps you can help. I have three computers and they are attached
    > to a router. Do they all have the same IP address? If someone
    > hooked onto my wireless system would they have the same IP address?
    >
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > Luke


    The public IP number of the internet connection from which you posted your
    article is 67.80.251.169 and anyone using the internet from that
    connection will have the same public IP number. If there is more than one
    machine on your local network, then your router will allocate a local IP
    number (probably 192.168.x.y where x and y are numbers between 0 and 254)
    to each one (and one to itself too) and your router will take care of
    sorting out which incoming stuff from the internet is meant for which local
    computer.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Aug 18, 2007
    #4
  5. Luke O'Malley used:

    X-Newsreader: Procomm Plus

    There's something you don't see often.


    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups.
    Except in Thunderbird, which can't filter that well.
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
     
    Blinky the Shark, Aug 18, 2007
    #5
  6. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    inc Guest

    Mike Easter wrote in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > Luke O'Malley wrote:
    >
    >> Perhaps you can help. I have three computers and they are attached
    >> to a router. Do they all have the same IP address? If someone
    >> hooked onto my wireless system would they have the same IP address?

    >
    > The typical router/LAN configuration is that the router gets/has an IP
    > address which is associated with its WAN connectivity, such as
    > 67.80.251.169 which it gets from the cable or dsl which is communicating
    > with the WAN/internet.
    >
    > Your 3 computers are assigned 'internal' IP addresses by the router such
    > as 192.168.1.145 and other 192.168.1.xxx or 192.168.xx.xxx IP and the
    > router keeps up with which computer is which.
    >
    > Then, when each of the 3 LAN computers makes a request of a webserver,
    > say, the request goes from a computer 192.168.1.145 thru' the router
    > which transmits the request as 67.80.251.169 to the WAN and when the
    > webserver on the internet answers to 67.80.251.169, the router passes
    > the information on to the computer 192.168.1.145 which made the request.
    >
    > The router acts as a NAT device, network address translator, translating
    > the IP address to enable each computer on the LAN to have its own
    > internal address while the LAN itself has only a single IP address.
    >
    > If someone hooks onto your wireless system, they will have your
    > 67.80.251.169 IP address as far as the WAN is concerned, but they will
    > have their own IP address as far as the router and the LAN is concerned,
    > such as 192.168.1.101.
    >
    >


    Archived!!

    I've never seen this information put in such a simple, understandable way.

    Thank you.

    inc
     
    inc, Aug 18, 2007
    #6
  7. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    Mike Easter Guest

    inc wrote:
    > Mike Easter


    >> The router acts as a NAT device,


    > Archived!!
    >
    > I've never seen this information put in such a simple, understandable
    > way.
    >
    > Thank you.


    YW. I'm generally not very succinct or concise, but tend to be rambling
    and wordy because it is quicker and easier for me that way. It takes me
    a lot longer to try use fewer words than more.

    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Aug 18, 2007
    #7
  8. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    TJ Guest

    "Mike Easter" <> wrote in news:46c72748$0$97236$892e7fe2
    @authen.yellow.readfreenews.net:

    > inc wrote:


    >> Mike Easter

    >
    >>> The router acts as a NAT device,

    >
    >> Archived!!
    >>
    >> I've never seen this information put in such a simple, understandable
    >> way.
    >>
    >> Thank you.

    >
    > YW. I'm generally not very succinct or concise, but tend to be rambling
    > and wordy because it is quicker and easier for me that way. It takes me
    > a lot longer to try use fewer words than more.


    Fair enough. Now what's HEMI-Powered's excuse? :)

    All kidding aside. The OP's questions could have been answered with three
    words. "Yes and Yes." (Sorry Roger, but you whiffed on that one.)

    IMO after that, it's up to the OP to come back and ask for a more detailed
    answer *IF* he wants one. Sometime's less, really is more.

    YMMV, of course.
     
    TJ, Aug 18, 2007
    #8
  9. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    Mike Easter Guest

    TJ wrote:
    > "Mike Easter"


    >> It takes me a lot longer to try use fewer words than more.


    > All kidding aside. The OP's questions could have been answered with
    > three words. "Yes and Yes."



    <or>
    Luke O'Malley wrote:
    > I have three computers and they are attached
    > to a router. Do they all have the same IP address?


    Yes and no.

    > If someone
    > hooked onto my wireless system would they have the same IP address?


    Yes and no.
    </or>

    That isn't very many words, but it isn't very helpful.

    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Aug 18, 2007
    #9
  10. TJ wrote:
    > "Mike Easter" <> wrote in news:46c72748$0$97236$892e7fe2
    > @authen.yellow.readfreenews.net:
    >
    >> inc wrote:

    >
    >>> Mike Easter
    >>>> The router acts as a NAT device,
    >>> Archived!!
    >>>
    >>> I've never seen this information put in such a simple, understandable
    >>> way.
    >>>
    >>> Thank you.

    >> YW. I'm generally not very succinct or concise, but tend to be rambling
    >> and wordy because it is quicker and easier for me that way. It takes me
    >> a lot longer to try use fewer words than more.

    >
    > Fair enough. Now what's HEMI-Powered's excuse? :)
    >
    > All kidding aside. The OP's questions could have been answered with three
    > words. "Yes and Yes." (Sorry Roger, but you whiffed on that one.)


    If any two devices on the internet try to communicate with each other,
    they must have unique IP's. In the instance of being behind a router and
    having IP addresses handed out by DHCP, they are still unique because
    they must go through the router and therefore NAT. The answer is still
    no and no. If you try to have identical IP addresses you'll have an IP
    conflict, which can cause very unpredictable behavior. It'll work one
    second and then won't work at all.

    BTW, Mike did a very good job of explaining, so I'm not disagreeing. But
    even on a small LAN with the router handing out IP's, you don't get the
    same IP on two different devices.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Aug 18, 2007
    #10
  11. Blinky the Shark wrote:
    > Luke O'Malley used:
    >
    > X-Newsreader: Procomm Plus
    >
    > There's something you don't see often.
    >
    >

    Isn't that something they used to hand out with modems?
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Aug 18, 2007
    #11
  12. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    TJ Guest

    "Mike Easter" <> wrote in news:46c72e59$0$97239
    $:

    > TJ wrote:


    >> "Mike Easter"

    >
    >>> It takes me a lot longer to try use fewer words than more.

    >
    >> All kidding aside. The OP's questions could have been answered with
    >> three words. "Yes and Yes."

    >
    >
    > <or>
    > Luke O'Malley wrote:
    >> I have three computers and they are attached
    >> to a router. Do they all have the same IP address?

    >
    > Yes and no.
    >
    >> If someone
    >> hooked onto my wireless system would they have the same IP address?

    >
    > Yes and no.
    > </or>
    >
    > That isn't very many words, but it isn't very helpful.



    Again. None of us know (yet) what Luke O'Mally was driving at.

    I assumed, and possibly mistakenly so, that he was asking about the IP
    that is visable to the outside world. Not the "individual" incoming IPs
    assigned by the router to each of the machines in his LAN.

    I have three machines here on my LAN. And no matter which one I post
    this message FROM, the IP in my headers will be the same. Yes?

    And if I had an insecure WAN, and somebody were to tap into it and post,
    it would show up as my IP, Yes?

    Or no?
     
    TJ, Aug 18, 2007
    #12
  13. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    Mike Easter Guest

    TJ wrote:
    > "Mike Easter"


    >> Yes and no.


    >> That isn't very many words, but it isn't very helpful.


    > I have three machines here on my LAN. And no matter which one I post
    > this message FROM, the IP in my headers will be the same. Yes?


    Yes.

    > And if I had an insecure WAN, and somebody were to tap into it and
    > post, it would show up as my IP, Yes?


    Yes.

    And if you click your Run ipconfig (or winipcfg) and look at 'your' IP
    address it won't say that. It will say your LAN address. From your
    LAN's perspective, all of the LAN's computers have their own addresses.

    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Aug 18, 2007
    #13
  14. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    TJ Guest

    "Mike Easter" <> wrote in
    news::

    > TJ wrote:
    >
    >> I have three machines here on my LAN. And no matter which one I post
    >> this message FROM, the IP in my headers will be the same. Yes?

    >
    > Yes.
    >
    >> And if I had an insecure WAN, and somebody were to tap into it and
    >> post, it would show up as my IP, Yes?

    >
    > Yes.


    Thank you.

    <snip>

    And in case you got the wrong impression? I too, thought your explanation
    was spot on, and well written.
     
    TJ, Aug 18, 2007
    #14
  15. Rôgêr wrote:

    > Luke O'Malley wrote:
    >> Hi
    >>
    >> Perhaps you can help. I have three computers and they are attached
    >> to a router. Do they all have the same IP address? If someone
    >> hooked onto my wireless system would they have the same IP address?

    >
    > No, and no. No two devices can have the same IP address, otherwise it
    > simply no workee.


    Hehe. Seen that one or the other time, just like coax networks with a
    christmas tree of tee-pieces on the backside of the poor server (and yet
    the poor thing still worked more or less). In case the IP protocol gave no
    connection, they just added netbeui or ipx or all of them ;-).
     
    wisdomkiller & pain, Aug 18, 2007
    #15
  16. Rôgêr wrote:
    > Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >> Luke O'Malley used:
    >>
    >> X-Newsreader: Procomm Plus
    >>
    >> There's something you don't see often.
    >>
    >>

    > Isn't that something they used to hand out with modems?


    I'm pretty sure it does hark back to at least the early 1990s.

    <wikiness>

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datastorm_Technologies,_Inc.


    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups.
    Except in Thunderbird, which can't filter that well.
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
     
    Blinky the Shark, Aug 18, 2007
    #16
  17. Blinky the Shark wrote:
    > Rôgêr wrote:
    >> Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >>> Luke O'Malley used:
    >>>
    >>> X-Newsreader: Procomm Plus
    >>>
    >>> There's something you don't see often.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Isn't that something they used to hand out with modems?

    >
    > I'm pretty sure it does hark back to at least the early 1990s.
    >
    > <wikiness>
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datastorm_Technologies,_Inc.


    No article by that name, but never mind. If I remember right, and that's
    a sure bet (lol), I'd already discovered early early versions of
    Netscape by the time I got Procomm Plus and never looked into it very
    much. Except I sort of recall it being command line based. Kind of
    reminds me of not too long ago I had an email server running Fedora. I
    could send emails from the command line. Couldn't get much more basic
    than that, so to speak.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Aug 18, 2007
    #17
  18. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    Mike Yetto Guest

    Bada bing Rôgêr <> bada bang:
    > Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >> Rôgêr wrote:
    >>> Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >>>> Luke O'Malley used:
    >>>>
    >>>> X-Newsreader: Procomm Plus
    >>>>
    >>>> There's something you don't see often.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Isn't that something they used to hand out with modems?

    >>
    >> I'm pretty sure it does hark back to at least the early 1990s.
    >>
    >> <wikiness>
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datastorm_Technologies,_Inc.

    >
    > No article by that name, but never mind. If I remember right, and that's
    > a sure bet (lol), I'd already discovered early early versions of
    > Netscape by the time I got Procomm Plus and never looked into it very
    > much. Except I sort of recall it being command line based. Kind of
    > reminds me of not too long ago I had an email server running Fedora. I
    > could send emails from the command line. Couldn't get much more basic
    > than that, so to speak.


    From a cached Google search:
    ====
    PROCOMM is a public domain communications package written and
    distributed by PTL Software Systems. Occasionally, a public domain
    software package becomes available that outshines most commercial
    software products. PROCOMM is definitely one of these products.
    The authors of PROCOMM suggest that users who find this software
    useful, give their support with a $25 donation.

    PROCOMM will run on an IBM PC, XT, AT or close compatible with
    either an RGB color, composite or monochrome display. I have
    personally used PROCOMM with an IBM PC, XT, AT, Zenith 150,
    Olivetti PC and a COMPAQ. PROCOMM will not run on a Zenith 120.
    ====

    Google for procomm dos

    Mike "Kermit file transfer" Yetto
    --
    "There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free
    government ought to be to trust no man living with power to
    endanger the public liberty."
    - John Adams
     
    Mike Yetto, Aug 18, 2007
    #18
  19. Mike Yetto wrote:
    > Bada bing Rôgêr <> bada bang:
    >> Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >>> Rôgêr wrote:
    >>>> Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >>>>> Luke O'Malley used:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> X-Newsreader: Procomm Plus
    >>>>>
    >>>>> There's something you don't see often.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>> Isn't that something they used to hand out with modems?
    >>> I'm pretty sure it does hark back to at least the early 1990s.
    >>>
    >>> <wikiness>
    >>>
    >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datastorm_Technologies,_Inc.

    >> No article by that name, but never mind. If I remember right, and that's
    >> a sure bet (lol), I'd already discovered early early versions of
    >> Netscape by the time I got Procomm Plus and never looked into it very
    >> much. Except I sort of recall it being command line based. Kind of
    >> reminds me of not too long ago I had an email server running Fedora. I
    >> could send emails from the command line. Couldn't get much more basic
    >> than that, so to speak.

    >
    > From a cached Google search:
    > ====
    > PROCOMM is a public domain communications package written and
    > distributed by PTL Software Systems. Occasionally, a public domain
    > software package becomes available that outshines most commercial
    > software products. PROCOMM is definitely one of these products.
    > The authors of PROCOMM suggest that users who find this software
    > useful, give their support with a $25 donation.
    >
    > PROCOMM will run on an IBM PC, XT, AT or close compatible with
    > either an RGB color, composite or monochrome display. I have
    > personally used PROCOMM with an IBM PC, XT, AT, Zenith 150,
    > Olivetti PC and a COMPAQ. PROCOMM will not run on a Zenith 120.
    > ====
    >
    > Google for procomm dos


    Err... no, I've got other plans. But thanks.
     
    =?UTF-8?B?UsO0Z8Oqcg==?=, Aug 18, 2007
    #19
  20. Rôgêr wrote:
    > Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >> Rôgêr wrote:
    >>> Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >>>> Luke O'Malley used:
    >>>>
    >>>> X-Newsreader: Procomm Plus
    >>>>
    >>>> There's something you don't see often.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Isn't that something they used to hand out with modems?

    >>
    >> I'm pretty sure it does hark back to at least the early 1990s.
    >>
    >> <wikiness>
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datastorm_Technologies,_Inc.

    >
    > No article by that name, but never mind. If I remember right, and that's


    I just pasted that link into a different browser, and it, too, displayed
    the page fine.

    > a sure bet (lol), I'd already discovered early early versions of
    > Netscape by the time I got Procomm Plus and never looked into it very
    > much. Except I sort of recall it being command line based. Kind of
    > reminds me of not too long ago I had an email server running Fedora. I
    > could send emails from the command line. Couldn't get much more basic
    > than that, so to speak.


    :)

    My latest project as been setting up two news servers here. Leafnode for
    this Linux box and Hamster on an XP laptop. Got 'em both running
    yesterday and today.


    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups.
    Except in Thunderbird, which can't filter that well.
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
     
    Blinky the Shark, Aug 19, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

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