Iomega aiming for 800GB DVDs

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Tarkus, May 25, 2005.

  1. Tarkus

    Tarkus Guest

    Iomega aiming for 800GB DVDs
    Published: May 25, 2005, 12:36 PM PDT
    By Richard Shim
    Staff Writer, CNET News.com

    Storage company Iomega is looking to increase the capacity of DVDs up to
    100 times, meaning it could, conceivably, create 800GB discs.

    The San Diego-based company announced on Tuesday that it had been issued
    a patent, U.S. Patent No. 6,879,556, which covers a method of encoding
    data on the surface of a DVD so more data--on the order of 40 to 100
    times that of current capacities--can be stored. Current DVDs can hold up
    to about 8.5GB of data. Data transfer speeds would also jump five to 30
    times, according to the company.

    The technique uses reflective nano-structures to encode data on a
    multilevel format.

    Rest of article:
    http://news.com.com/Iomega aiming for 800GB DVDs/2100-1041_3-5720359.html?part=rss
    --
    "Leeloo Minai Lekarariba-Laminai-Tchai Ekbat De Sebat."

    Now playing: "*** 6. King Crimson - Larks' Tongues In Aspic, Part Two"
     
    Tarkus, May 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. Tarkus

    Hugh Candlin Guest

    Hugh Candlin, May 26, 2005
    #2
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  3. Tarkus

    Nonymous Guest

    "Tarkus" <> wrote in message
    news:9.com...
    > Iomega aiming for 800GB DVDs
    > Published: May 25, 2005, 12:36 PM PDT
    > By Richard Shim
    > Staff Writer, CNET News.com
    >
    > Storage company Iomega is looking to increase the capacity of DVDs up to
    > 100 times, meaning it could, conceivably, create 800GB discs.
    >
    > The San Diego-based company announced on Tuesday that it had been issued
    > a patent, U.S. Patent No. 6,879,556, which covers a method of encoding
    > data on the surface of a DVD so more data--on the order of 40 to 100
    > times that of current capacities--can be stored. Current DVDs can hold up
    > to about 8.5GB of data. Data transfer speeds would also jump five to 30
    > times, according to the company.
    >
    > The technique uses reflective nano-structures to encode data on a
    > multilevel format.
    >
    > Rest of article:
    > http://news.com.com/Iomega aiming for 800GB DVDs/2100-1041_3-5720359.html?part=rss



    And they'll charge a fortune for blanks, too, just like they did for empty
    Zip and Jazz drive cartridges.
     
    Nonymous, May 26, 2005
    #3
  4. Tarkus

    Nonymous Guest

    "Hugh Candlin" <> wrote in message
    news:G4cle.251642$...
    >
    > "Tarkus" <> wrote in message
    > news:9.com...
    >>
    >> Storage company Iomega is looking to increase the capacity of DVDs up to
    >> 100 times, meaning it could, conceivably, create 800GB discs.

    >
    > Obsolete already.
    >
    > BOFFINS MAKE DVDS LAST FOREVER
    > http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/news/tm_objectid=15550277&method=full&siteid=89488-name_page.html


    I don't know... I think we'll see Iomega's technology, which has already
    been given a patent, way before these university 'scientists' who have done
    nothing more than informally announce the results of their playing around in
    the lab for the last three years.
     
    Nonymous, May 26, 2005
    #4
  5. Tarkus

    Guest

    On Thu, 26 May 2005 07:16:12 -0400, "Nonymous" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Hugh Candlin" <> wrote in message
    >news:G4cle.251642$...
    >>
    >> "Tarkus" <> wrote in message
    >> news:9.com...
    >>>
    >>> Storage company Iomega is looking to increase the capacity of DVDs up to
    >>> 100 times, meaning it could, conceivably, create 800GB discs.

    >>
    >> Obsolete already.
    >>
    >> BOFFINS MAKE DVDS LAST FOREVER
    >> http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/news/tm_objectid=15550277&method=full&siteid=89488-name_page.html

    >
    >I don't know... I think we'll see Iomega's technology, which has already
    >been given a patent, way before these university 'scientists' who have done
    >nothing more than informally announce the results of their playing around in
    >the lab for the last three years.
    >

    When you consider that Iomega gave us "click of death", crappy zip and
    jazz drives that died within months and then refused to fix or replace
    them, you wonder how many people would embrace another non-standard
    format from a company with questionable tech expertese.

    Imagine filling a dozen 800 gig dvds with your favorite movies and
    then finding out they wouldn't play any more. 4 giv dvds may be boring
    but they DO work, they are incredibly cheap and many vendors make
    players that play them.
     
    , Jun 13, 2005
    #5
  6. Tarkus

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, wrote:
    >On Thu, 26 May 2005 07:16:12 -0400, "Nonymous" <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Hugh Candlin" <> wrote in message
    >>news:G4cle.251642$...
    >>>
    >>> "Tarkus" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:9.com...
    >>>>
    >>>> Storage company Iomega is looking to increase the capacity of DVDs up to
    >>>> 100 times, meaning it could, conceivably, create 800GB discs.
    >>>
    >>> Obsolete already.
    >>>
    >>> BOFFINS MAKE DVDS LAST FOREVER
    >>>

    > http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/news/tm_objectid=15550277&method=full&si
    >teid=89488-name_page.html
    >>
    >>I don't know... I think we'll see Iomega's technology, which has already
    >>been given a patent, way before these university 'scientists' who have done
    >>nothing more than informally announce the results of their playing around in
    >>the lab for the last three years.
    >>

    >When you consider that Iomega gave us "click of death", crappy zip and
    >jazz drives that died within months and then refused to fix or replace
    >them, you wonder how many people would embrace another non-standard
    >format from a company with questionable tech expertese.


    Iomega was and did have good tech until they moved their developement and
    assembly out of Utah and into indonesia.

    >
    >Imagine filling a dozen 800 gig dvds with your favorite movies and
    >then finding out they wouldn't play any more. 4 giv dvds may be boring
    >but they DO work, they are incredibly cheap and many vendors make
    >players that play them.
     
    GMAN, Jun 14, 2005
    #6
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