Intranet Networks

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by Creekside, Aug 6, 2006.

  1. Creekside

    Creekside Guest

    I've seen different info on Class A, B, and C. Are the addresses:
    10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
    172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255
    192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255

    Or is this just Microsofts example??
     
    Creekside, Aug 6, 2006
    #1
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  2. In a Class A IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    0 and 127.
    In a Class B IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    128 and 191.
    In a Class C IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    192 and 223.

    In a Class D IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    224 and 239. Class D addresses are used for multicasting to a group of IP
    hosts and are not assigned to individual devices on a TCP/IP network.

    In a Class E IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    240 and 255. Class E addresses cannot be assigned to individual devices on
    a TCP/IP network. Instead they are reserved for experimental and future
    use.

    Loopback addresses are IP addresses with 127 in their first octet. These
    addresses are used to test TCP/IP configuration and cannot be assigned to
    individual hosts on a TCP/IP network.

    Mark

    "Creekside" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've seen different info on Class A, B, and C. Are the addresses:
    > 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
    > 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255
    > 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255
    >
    > Or is this just Microsofts example??
     
    Mark Hatfield, Aug 6, 2006
    #2
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  3. Creekside

    Creekside Guest

    In MS courseware they write them out as I had it in my question, it made it
    seem like it was that specific. Do the subnet masks change with the classes
    too?

    "Mark Hatfield" wrote:

    > In a Class A IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    > 0 and 127.
    > In a Class B IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    > 128 and 191.
    > In a Class C IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    > 192 and 223.
    >
    > In a Class D IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    > 224 and 239. Class D addresses are used for multicasting to a group of IP
    > hosts and are not assigned to individual devices on a TCP/IP network.
    >
    > In a Class E IP address the first octet of the IP address is always between
    > 240 and 255. Class E addresses cannot be assigned to individual devices on
    > a TCP/IP network. Instead they are reserved for experimental and future
    > use.
    >
    > Loopback addresses are IP addresses with 127 in their first octet. These
    > addresses are used to test TCP/IP configuration and cannot be assigned to
    > individual hosts on a TCP/IP network.
    >
    > Mark
    >
    > "Creekside" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > I've seen different info on Class A, B, and C. Are the addresses:
    > > 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
    > > 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255
    > > 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255
    > >
    > > Or is this just Microsofts example??

    >
    >
    >
     
    Creekside, Aug 6, 2006
    #3
  4. "Creekside" wrote:

    > In MS courseware they write them out as I had it in my question, it made it
    > seem like it was that specific. Do the subnet masks change with the classes
    > too?


    The networks in your original post are reserved for intranet usage.
    Yes, the netmask changes depending on how big the current network is.
    It's calculated by inverting the binary number of hosts and replacing all
    ones after the first zero with zeros. Group the result by 8 and convert each
    group back to decimal.

    With 255 hosts, you get a netmask of 255.255.255.0
     
    Henrik Johansson, Aug 6, 2006
    #4
  5. Creekside

    BD [MCNGP] Guest

    << While I was at work, Creekside spurted out:
    <<------------------------------------------>>
    > I've seen different info on Class A, B, and C. Are the addresses:
    > 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
    > 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255
    > 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255
    >
    > Or is this just Microsofts example??
    >

    Obviously Mark misread your original post. No, those are not JUST M$ examples.
    Those are the standard Intranet Addresses. They have been the standard since
    day-one. You can find more info on them at www.Cisco.com.

    HTH

    --
    BD
    MCNGP #51
    -- MCNGP.com - You know IT!?
    -- www.CertGuard.com; www.SWPPM.com
     
    BD [MCNGP], Aug 7, 2006
    #5
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