Internet trouble?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Joe J., Jul 17, 2008.

  1. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    Since yesterday afternoon I've been having connection issues. I have a two
    computer network at home and my connection is via a Sprint broadband card
    plugged into a Kyocera router, which feeds both computers.
    Sometimes it won't connect at all or I can only receive mail via Outlook, no
    other web sites work. Other times I can connect but then only to certain
    sites, such as Yahoo mail, or Craig's list. When it does work, it loads
    without graphics and everything is just text on the screen. The annoying
    pop-ups are gone and so are all the ads. I tried uninstalling AVG but that
    didn't change anything. The error message I keep getting for sites is that
    it can't find the server. I'm using both IE and Mozilla and get the same
    errors. The other computer is running IE and having the same troubles.
    Sometimes the only thing that works is mail, using Outlook, no other web
    connections, including newsnet. I get the error that it can't find the
    server for newsnet also. At the moment, everything is working, but this
    happened earlier today and then everything quit again.
    When it does connect the speed is fine.
    I don't own a laptop so I can't know if it would be a problem with the
    Sprint card. I do have Network Magic and I've reset the connection several
    times and it says there is nothing wrong with the network or the internet
    connection. It resets the IP address and says the connection is fine, but
    it didn't work.
    At the moment, everything is working and I did a speed test on Speakeasy and
    it's showing 750kbps which is average for my connection.
    Is it possible there is Internet server troubles for the last 20 hours or do
    I have some kind of trouble?
    Any thoughts appreciated,
    Joe
     
    Joe J., Jul 17, 2008
    #1
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  2. Joe J.

    Paul Guest

    Joe J. wrote:
    > Since yesterday afternoon I've been having connection issues. I have a two
    > computer network at home and my connection is via a Sprint broadband card
    > plugged into a Kyocera router, which feeds both computers.
    > Sometimes it won't connect at all or I can only receive mail via Outlook, no
    > other web sites work. Other times I can connect but then only to certain
    > sites, such as Yahoo mail, or Craig's list. When it does work, it loads
    > without graphics and everything is just text on the screen. The annoying
    > pop-ups are gone and so are all the ads. I tried uninstalling AVG but that
    > didn't change anything. The error message I keep getting for sites is that
    > it can't find the server. I'm using both IE and Mozilla and get the same
    > errors. The other computer is running IE and having the same troubles.
    > Sometimes the only thing that works is mail, using Outlook, no other web
    > connections, including newsnet. I get the error that it can't find the
    > server for newsnet also. At the moment, everything is working, but this
    > happened earlier today and then everything quit again.
    > When it does connect the speed is fine.
    > I don't own a laptop so I can't know if it would be a problem with the
    > Sprint card. I do have Network Magic and I've reset the connection several
    > times and it says there is nothing wrong with the network or the internet
    > connection. It resets the IP address and says the connection is fine, but
    > it didn't work.
    > At the moment, everything is working and I did a speed test on Speakeasy and
    > it's showing 750kbps which is average for my connection.
    > Is it possible there is Internet server troubles for the last 20 hours or do
    > I have some kind of trouble?
    > Any thoughts appreciated,
    > Joe
    >


    Open a DOS box (command prompt window). Try

    nslookup www.altavista.com

    The returned result shows the results of a DNS lookup, which converts
    a symbolic address, into a numeric one (72.30.186.25). And the server
    that was consulted, to get the answer.

    If there is a long delay, before the answer returns, it means one of
    the DNS servers in your list is not working. And as far as I know,
    Windows evaluates them in the same order all the time. So the duff one
    will be checked first every time. (Other OSes may be clever enough to
    consult the known working one first.)

    My internet connection uses DHCP for both my router and DHCP from
    my computer to my router. In both cases, DHCP automatically asks
    for the DNS server addresses from the DHCP host. Two are provided as a
    rule, which is intended to give some redundancy against failures.
    And in some cases, one or both of the suggested DNS servers might
    not actually be working. (Although lately I cannot say I've had
    any problems, so they've gotten better at keeping them running.)

    You can also assigned DNS addresses statically. My router has
    room for a couple entries in its WAN setup page. And in Windows,
    I suppose you could disable DHCP, and do some assignments yourself.
    The trick is, to know some DNS addresses at your ISP to use.
    (Mine used to serve a lot of users through some main DNS servers,
    but has now distributed things a lot more. You could do a
    reverse lookup on your current DNS addresses, to figure out
    whether there is a naming convention for them at your ISP, and
    then try some other similarly named nodes.)

    Also note, that there was a recent change to DNS, in that during
    the last Windows Update, a change was pushed out to fix a DNS
    exploit. That would have happened on Patch Tuesday, which is the
    second Tuesday of every month.

    http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/07/09/serious-dns-flaw-caused-hacking

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 17, 2008
    #2
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  3. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    "Paul" <> wrote in message news:g5o25o$bdp$...
    > Joe J. wrote:
    >> Since yesterday afternoon I've been having connection issues. I have a
    >> two computer network at home and my connection is via a Sprint broadband
    >> card plugged into a Kyocera router, which feeds both computers.
    >> Sometimes it won't connect at all or I can only receive mail via Outlook,
    >> no other web sites work. Other times I can connect but then only to
    >> certain sites, such as Yahoo mail, or Craig's list. When it does work,
    >> it loads without graphics and everything is just text on the screen. The
    >> annoying pop-ups are gone and so are all the ads. I tried uninstalling
    >> AVG but that didn't change anything. The error message I keep getting
    >> for sites is that it can't find the server. I'm using both IE and
    >> Mozilla and get the same errors. The other computer is running IE and
    >> having the same troubles.
    >> Sometimes the only thing that works is mail, using Outlook, no other web
    >> connections, including newsnet. I get the error that it can't find the
    >> server for newsnet also. At the moment, everything is working, but this
    >> happened earlier today and then everything quit again.
    >> When it does connect the speed is fine.
    >> I don't own a laptop so I can't know if it would be a problem with the
    >> Sprint card. I do have Network Magic and I've reset the connection
    >> several times and it says there is nothing wrong with the network or the
    >> internet connection. It resets the IP address and says the connection is
    >> fine, but it didn't work.
    >> At the moment, everything is working and I did a speed test on Speakeasy
    >> and it's showing 750kbps which is average for my connection.
    >> Is it possible there is Internet server troubles for the last 20 hours or
    >> do I have some kind of trouble?
    >> Any thoughts appreciated,
    >> Joe

    >
    > Open a DOS box (command prompt window). Try
    >
    > nslookup www.altavista.com
    >
    > The returned result shows the results of a DNS lookup, which converts
    > a symbolic address, into a numeric one (72.30.186.25). And the server
    > that was consulted, to get the answer.
    >
    > If there is a long delay, before the answer returns, it means one of
    > the DNS servers in your list is not working. And as far as I know,
    > Windows evaluates them in the same order all the time. So the duff one
    > will be checked first every time. (Other OSes may be clever enough to
    > consult the known working one first.)
    >
    > My internet connection uses DHCP for both my router and DHCP from
    > my computer to my router. In both cases, DHCP automatically asks
    > for the DNS server addresses from the DHCP host. Two are provided as a
    > rule, which is intended to give some redundancy against failures.
    > And in some cases, one or both of the suggested DNS servers might
    > not actually be working. (Although lately I cannot say I've had
    > any problems, so they've gotten better at keeping them running.)
    >
    > You can also assigned DNS addresses statically. My router has
    > room for a couple entries in its WAN setup page. And in Windows,
    > I suppose you could disable DHCP, and do some assignments yourself.
    > The trick is, to know some DNS addresses at your ISP to use.
    > (Mine used to serve a lot of users through some main DNS servers,
    > but has now distributed things a lot more. You could do a
    > reverse lookup on your current DNS addresses, to figure out
    > whether there is a naming convention for them at your ISP, and
    > then try some other similarly named nodes.)
    >
    > Also note, that there was a recent change to DNS, in that during
    > the last Windows Update, a change was pushed out to fix a DNS
    > exploit. That would have happened on Patch Tuesday, which is the
    > second Tuesday of every month.
    >
    > http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/07/09/serious-dns-flaw-caused-hacking
    >
    > Paul


    Tried nslookup and got the following:
    SERVER: unknown
    Address: 192.168.0.1
    Unknown can't find nslookup: non-existent domain. Since I was able to this
    right now, everything is working ok, but it quit for the 3 previous hours.

    Joe J
     
    Joe J., Jul 17, 2008
    #3
  4. Joe J.

    Paul Guest

    Joe J. wrote:
    > "Paul" <> wrote in message news:g5o25o$bdp$...
    >> Joe J. wrote:
    >>> Since yesterday afternoon I've been having connection issues. I have a
    >>> two computer network at home and my connection is via a Sprint broadband
    >>> card plugged into a Kyocera router, which feeds both computers.
    >>> Sometimes it won't connect at all or I can only receive mail via Outlook,
    >>> no other web sites work. Other times I can connect but then only to
    >>> certain sites, such as Yahoo mail, or Craig's list. When it does work,
    >>> it loads without graphics and everything is just text on the screen. The
    >>> annoying pop-ups are gone and so are all the ads. I tried uninstalling
    >>> AVG but that didn't change anything. The error message I keep getting
    >>> for sites is that it can't find the server. I'm using both IE and
    >>> Mozilla and get the same errors. The other computer is running IE and
    >>> having the same troubles.
    >>> Sometimes the only thing that works is mail, using Outlook, no other web
    >>> connections, including newsnet. I get the error that it can't find the
    >>> server for newsnet also. At the moment, everything is working, but this
    >>> happened earlier today and then everything quit again.
    >>> When it does connect the speed is fine.
    >>> I don't own a laptop so I can't know if it would be a problem with the
    >>> Sprint card. I do have Network Magic and I've reset the connection
    >>> several times and it says there is nothing wrong with the network or the
    >>> internet connection. It resets the IP address and says the connection is
    >>> fine, but it didn't work.
    >>> At the moment, everything is working and I did a speed test on Speakeasy
    >>> and it's showing 750kbps which is average for my connection.
    >>> Is it possible there is Internet server troubles for the last 20 hours or
    >>> do I have some kind of trouble?
    >>> Any thoughts appreciated,
    >>> Joe

    >> Open a DOS box (command prompt window). Try
    >>
    >> nslookup www.altavista.com
    >>
    >> The returned result shows the results of a DNS lookup, which converts
    >> a symbolic address, into a numeric one (72.30.186.25). And the server
    >> that was consulted, to get the answer.
    >>
    >> If there is a long delay, before the answer returns, it means one of
    >> the DNS servers in your list is not working. And as far as I know,
    >> Windows evaluates them in the same order all the time. So the duff one
    >> will be checked first every time. (Other OSes may be clever enough to
    >> consult the known working one first.)
    >>
    >> My internet connection uses DHCP for both my router and DHCP from
    >> my computer to my router. In both cases, DHCP automatically asks
    >> for the DNS server addresses from the DHCP host. Two are provided as a
    >> rule, which is intended to give some redundancy against failures.
    >> And in some cases, one or both of the suggested DNS servers might
    >> not actually be working. (Although lately I cannot say I've had
    >> any problems, so they've gotten better at keeping them running.)
    >>
    >> You can also assigned DNS addresses statically. My router has
    >> room for a couple entries in its WAN setup page. And in Windows,
    >> I suppose you could disable DHCP, and do some assignments yourself.
    >> The trick is, to know some DNS addresses at your ISP to use.
    >> (Mine used to serve a lot of users through some main DNS servers,
    >> but has now distributed things a lot more. You could do a
    >> reverse lookup on your current DNS addresses, to figure out
    >> whether there is a naming convention for them at your ISP, and
    >> then try some other similarly named nodes.)
    >>
    >> Also note, that there was a recent change to DNS, in that during
    >> the last Windows Update, a change was pushed out to fix a DNS
    >> exploit. That would have happened on Patch Tuesday, which is the
    >> second Tuesday of every month.
    >>
    >> http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/07/09/serious-dns-flaw-caused-hacking
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > Tried nslookup and got the following:
    > SERVER: unknown
    > Address: 192.168.0.1
    > Unknown can't find nslookup: non-existent domain. Since I was able to this
    > right now, everything is working ok, but it quit for the 3 previous hours.
    >
    > Joe J
    >
    >


    This is what mine returns. I used this command, to dump the DOS output into
    a text file. The ">" redirects STDOUT to a file.

    nslookup www.altavista.com >out.txt

    And this is the output.

    Server: UnKnown
    Address: 192.168.1.1

    Name: avatw.search.yahoo2.akadns.net
    Address: 72.30.186.25
    Aliases: www.altavista.com

    The reason the server is unknown, is because there is no reverse mapping
    for a private address (192.168.1.1). In other words, the computer asks
    the router. The router in turn, consults one of the two DNS servers
    it was passed, via DHCP, from the ISP. There is no symbolic equivalent
    to 192.168.1.1, which is why it has to remain "UnKnown".

    But I can see the actual servers used, in my router setup page.

    The fact that I got a translation, means it worked, and one of
    my two DNS servers at the ISP, was working.

    For people who have a static setup for their Windows computer, the
    server name could have been translated and named, because then the
    nslookup program would be dealing with a public DNS server directly.

    If you're not getting the "72.30.186.25" part of the answer, then
    DNS is broken. You could talk to the staff at your ISP, for example,
    to seek a resolution. I've used workarounds in the past, to avoid
    phoning them :) Such as manually setting up DNS, when there is a
    problem. Now that there are so many more DNS servers at my ISP, this
    no longer seems to be an issue here.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 17, 2008
    #4
  5. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    >>
    >> Tried nslookup and got the following:
    >> SERVER: unknown
    >> Address: 192.168.0.1
    >> Unknown can't find nslookup: non-existent domain. Since I was able to
    >> this right now, everything is working ok, but it quit for the 3 previous
    >> hours.
    >>
    >> Joe J

    >
    > This is what mine returns. I used this command, to dump the DOS output
    > into
    > a text file. The ">" redirects STDOUT to a file.
    >
    > nslookup www.altavista.com >out.txt
    >
    > And this is the output.
    >
    > Server: UnKnown
    > Address: 192.168.1.1
    >
    > Name: avatw.search.yahoo2.akadns.net
    > Address: 72.30.186.25
    > Aliases: www.altavista.com
    >
    > The reason the server is unknown, is because there is no reverse mapping
    > for a private address (192.168.1.1). In other words, the computer asks
    > the router. The router in turn, consults one of the two DNS servers
    > it was passed, via DHCP, from the ISP. There is no symbolic equivalent
    > to 192.168.1.1, which is why it has to remain "UnKnown".
    >
    > But I can see the actual servers used, in my router setup page.
    >
    > The fact that I got a translation, means it worked, and one of
    > my two DNS servers at the ISP, was working.
    >
    > For people who have a static setup for their Windows computer, the
    > server name could have been translated and named, because then the
    > nslookup program would be dealing with a public DNS server directly.
    >
    > If you're not getting the "72.30.186.25" part of the answer, then
    > DNS is broken. You could talk to the staff at your ISP, for example,
    > to seek a resolution. I've used workarounds in the past, to avoid
    > phoning them :) Such as manually setting up DNS, when there is a
    > problem. Now that there are so many more DNS servers at my ISP, this
    > no longer seems to be an issue here.
    >
    > Paul


    Hi Paul,

    Thanks for the replies but you're now talking over my head.
    What does that mean the "DNS is broken"?

    I also don't really know who my Internet Service Provider is?
    I connect using a Sprint broadband card. Would Sprint be my ISP?

    Sorry for the dumb questions!
    Joe
     
    Joe J., Jul 17, 2008
    #5
  6. "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    news:ifPfk.6055$...
    >>>
    >>> Tried nslookup and got the following:
    >>> SERVER: unknown
    >>> Address: 192.168.0.1
    >>> Unknown can't find nslookup: non-existent domain. Since I was able to
    >>> this right now, everything is working ok, but it quit for the 3 previous
    >>> hours.
    >>>
    >>> Joe J

    >>
    >> This is what mine returns. I used this command, to dump the DOS output
    >> into
    >> a text file. The ">" redirects STDOUT to a file.
    >>
    >> nslookup www.altavista.com >out.txt
    >>
    >> And this is the output.
    >>
    >> Server: UnKnown
    >> Address: 192.168.1.1
    >>
    >> Name: avatw.search.yahoo2.akadns.net
    >> Address: 72.30.186.25
    >> Aliases: www.altavista.com
    >>
    >> The reason the server is unknown, is because there is no reverse mapping
    >> for a private address (192.168.1.1). In other words, the computer asks
    >> the router. The router in turn, consults one of the two DNS servers
    >> it was passed, via DHCP, from the ISP. There is no symbolic equivalent
    >> to 192.168.1.1, which is why it has to remain "UnKnown".
    >>
    >> But I can see the actual servers used, in my router setup page.
    >>
    >> The fact that I got a translation, means it worked, and one of
    >> my two DNS servers at the ISP, was working.
    >>
    >> For people who have a static setup for their Windows computer, the
    >> server name could have been translated and named, because then the
    >> nslookup program would be dealing with a public DNS server directly.
    >>
    >> If you're not getting the "72.30.186.25" part of the answer, then
    >> DNS is broken. You could talk to the staff at your ISP, for example,
    >> to seek a resolution. I've used workarounds in the past, to avoid
    >> phoning them :) Such as manually setting up DNS, when there is a
    >> problem. Now that there are so many more DNS servers at my ISP, this
    >> no longer seems to be an issue here.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > Hi Paul,
    >
    > Thanks for the replies but you're now talking over my head.
    > What does that mean the "DNS is broken"?
    >
    > I also don't really know who my Internet Service Provider is?
    > I connect using a Sprint broadband card. Would Sprint be my ISP?
    >
    > Sorry for the dumb questions!
    > Joe
    >



    DNS, Dynamic Name Server. DNS assigns the IP address of stuff conected to
    it.

    You can be sure the Internet is not broken.

    Your trouble is that the router you are using is having trouble, or your ISP
    is dropping the ball. Yes, Sprint would be your ISP (Internet Service
    Provider) IP is Internet Protocol, everything has an IP address. Your
    broadband card does not tolerate being the Internet connection point for a
    network, it only works for a single machine. I suppose in theory, it could
    be hosted by a router, then a network could be built around the router that
    uses the broadband card. I have to worry that the quality of service (the
    ability to send and receive packets of data) would be diminished in an
    architecture like this. I recently tried to network behind a machine with a
    broadband card used for Internet access, and it did not work. The host
    machine (the one with the broadband card in it) reported the second machine
    as a conflict with the IP address -- basically, it said two machines with
    the same address is not acceptable.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 17, 2008
    #6
  7. Joe J.

    Paul Guest

    Joe J. wrote:
    >>> Tried nslookup and got the following:
    >>> SERVER: unknown
    >>> Address: 192.168.0.1
    >>> Unknown can't find nslookup: non-existent domain. Since I was able to
    >>> this right now, everything is working ok, but it quit for the 3 previous
    >>> hours.
    >>>
    >>> Joe J

    >> This is what mine returns. I used this command, to dump the DOS output
    >> into
    >> a text file. The ">" redirects STDOUT to a file.
    >>
    >> nslookup www.altavista.com >out.txt
    >>
    >> And this is the output.
    >>
    >> Server: UnKnown
    >> Address: 192.168.1.1
    >>
    >> Name: avatw.search.yahoo2.akadns.net
    >> Address: 72.30.186.25
    >> Aliases: www.altavista.com
    >>
    >> The reason the server is unknown, is because there is no reverse mapping
    >> for a private address (192.168.1.1). In other words, the computer asks
    >> the router. The router in turn, consults one of the two DNS servers
    >> it was passed, via DHCP, from the ISP. There is no symbolic equivalent
    >> to 192.168.1.1, which is why it has to remain "UnKnown".
    >>
    >> But I can see the actual servers used, in my router setup page.
    >>
    >> The fact that I got a translation, means it worked, and one of
    >> my two DNS servers at the ISP, was working.
    >>
    >> For people who have a static setup for their Windows computer, the
    >> server name could have been translated and named, because then the
    >> nslookup program would be dealing with a public DNS server directly.
    >>
    >> If you're not getting the "72.30.186.25" part of the answer, then
    >> DNS is broken. You could talk to the staff at your ISP, for example,
    >> to seek a resolution. I've used workarounds in the past, to avoid
    >> phoning them :) Such as manually setting up DNS, when there is a
    >> problem. Now that there are so many more DNS servers at my ISP, this
    >> no longer seems to be an issue here.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > Hi Paul,
    >
    > Thanks for the replies but you're now talking over my head.
    > What does that mean the "DNS is broken"?
    >
    > I also don't really know who my Internet Service Provider is?
    > I connect using a Sprint broadband card. Would Sprint be my ISP?
    >
    > Sorry for the dumb questions!
    > Joe


    Somewhere, in the documentation you got from Sprint, there should
    have been a phone number to call, to get support for your Internet
    service. That is who you want to call now. If the conclusion is,
    that DNS (domain name service, translating symbolic addresses, to
    numeric addresses) is broken, then you should talk to the support
    people.

    Another way to evaluate this. If you go to your web browser, and
    type in

    http://www.altavista.com

    and that doesn't work ("server not found" or whatever).
    And then you try instead,

    http://72.30.186.25

    the second format avoids the DNS translation you should have working
    for you. Nobody wants to type in or remember numbers, which is why
    we have symbolic addresses instead. The DNS server performs
    the translation from the first form, to the second form. The
    number form is needed, because numbers are stuffed into the
    headers of each packet, indicating where the packet should
    go.

    DNS servers are an integral part of the service. The "fat pipe"
    to Sprint can be working, but it there is no working DNS server,
    it'll be damned hard to get anything done.

    If your router has a WAN page in the setup for the router,
    you might see the addresses of the DNS servers listed.
    Keeping track of the DNS servers that are working or not
    working, might help when you're talking to Sprint. In
    case they offer the usual "we don't see a problem here sir"
    kind of answer. I know I've had to do extra research work,
    to get any kind of admission from the support at my ISP,
    which is why I don't waste a lot of time on them.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 17, 2008
    #7
  8. "Paul" <> wrote in message news:g5ogg4$7ao$...
    > Joe J. wrote:
    >>>> Tried nslookup and got the following:
    >>>> SERVER: unknown
    >>>> Address: 192.168.0.1
    >>>> Unknown can't find nslookup: non-existent domain. Since I was able to
    >>>> this right now, everything is working ok, but it quit for the 3
    >>>> previous hours.
    >>>>
    >>>> Joe J
    >>> This is what mine returns. I used this command, to dump the DOS output
    >>> into
    >>> a text file. The ">" redirects STDOUT to a file.
    >>>
    >>> nslookup www.altavista.com >out.txt
    >>>
    >>> And this is the output.
    >>>
    >>> Server: UnKnown
    >>> Address: 192.168.1.1
    >>>
    >>> Name: avatw.search.yahoo2.akadns.net
    >>> Address: 72.30.186.25
    >>> Aliases: www.altavista.com
    >>>
    >>> The reason the server is unknown, is because there is no reverse mapping
    >>> for a private address (192.168.1.1). In other words, the computer asks
    >>> the router. The router in turn, consults one of the two DNS servers
    >>> it was passed, via DHCP, from the ISP. There is no symbolic equivalent
    >>> to 192.168.1.1, which is why it has to remain "UnKnown".
    >>>
    >>> But I can see the actual servers used, in my router setup page.
    >>>
    >>> The fact that I got a translation, means it worked, and one of
    >>> my two DNS servers at the ISP, was working.
    >>>
    >>> For people who have a static setup for their Windows computer, the
    >>> server name could have been translated and named, because then the
    >>> nslookup program would be dealing with a public DNS server directly.
    >>>
    >>> If you're not getting the "72.30.186.25" part of the answer, then
    >>> DNS is broken. You could talk to the staff at your ISP, for example,
    >>> to seek a resolution. I've used workarounds in the past, to avoid
    >>> phoning them :) Such as manually setting up DNS, when there is a
    >>> problem. Now that there are so many more DNS servers at my ISP, this
    >>> no longer seems to be an issue here.
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>
    >> Hi Paul,
    >>
    >> Thanks for the replies but you're now talking over my head.
    >> What does that mean the "DNS is broken"?
    >>
    >> I also don't really know who my Internet Service Provider is?
    >> I connect using a Sprint broadband card. Would Sprint be my ISP?
    >>
    >> Sorry for the dumb questions!
    >> Joe

    >
    > Somewhere, in the documentation you got from Sprint, there should
    > have been a phone number to call, to get support for your Internet
    > service. That is who you want to call now. If the conclusion is,
    > that DNS (domain name service, translating symbolic addresses, to
    > numeric addresses) is broken, then you should talk to the support
    > people.
    >
    > Another way to evaluate this. If you go to your web browser, and
    > type in
    >
    > http://www.altavista.com
    >
    > and that doesn't work ("server not found" or whatever).
    > And then you try instead,
    >
    > http://72.30.186.25
    >
    > the second format avoids the DNS translation you should have working
    > for you. Nobody wants to type in or remember numbers, which is why
    > we have symbolic addresses instead. The DNS server performs
    > the translation from the first form, to the second form. The
    > number form is needed, because numbers are stuffed into the
    > headers of each packet, indicating where the packet should
    > go.
    >
    > DNS servers are an integral part of the service. The "fat pipe"
    > to Sprint can be working, but it there is no working DNS server,
    > it'll be damned hard to get anything done.
    >
    > If your router has a WAN page in the setup for the router,
    > you might see the addresses of the DNS servers listed.
    > Keeping track of the DNS servers that are working or not
    > working, might help when you're talking to Sprint. In
    > case they offer the usual "we don't see a problem here sir"
    > kind of answer. I know I've had to do extra research work,
    > to get any kind of admission from the support at my ISP,
    > which is why I don't waste a lot of time on them.
    >
    > Paul



    Paul,
    He's using what is effectively a modem to establish an Internet connection.
    It's not a dial-up modem, but works in much the same way but faster.

    I would suggest he disable all of the machines on his network and try the
    card with only one machine. If this improves things, then his hardware is
    all working properly, but the modem can't support all of the connections at
    the same time. Basically, he has a QoS issue
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 18, 2008
    #8
  9. Joe J.

    Baron Guest

    Jeff Strickland Inscribed thus:

    > I recently tried to network behind a machine with a broadband card
    > used for Internet access, and it did not work. The host machine (the
    > one with the broadband card in it) reported the second machine as a
    > conflict with the IP address -- basically, it said two machines with
    > the same address is not acceptable.


    Hi Jeff,

    I thought you had sorted that issue ?

    Did you assign a static IP for the second machine and put the mapping
    into the hosts file.

    --
    Best Reagrds:
    Baron.
     
    Baron, Jul 18, 2008
    #9
  10. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    snip
    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:g5ogc9$4od$...
    >

    snip>>>
    >
    >
    > DNS, Dynamic Name Server. DNS assigns the IP address of stuff conected to
    > it.
    >
    > You can be sure the Internet is not broken.
    >
    > Your trouble is that the router you are using is having trouble, or your
    > ISP is dropping the ball. Yes, Sprint would be your ISP (Internet Service
    > Provider) IP is Internet Protocol, everything has an IP address. Your
    > broadband card does not tolerate being the Internet connection point for a
    > network, it only works for a single machine. I suppose in theory, it could
    > be hosted by a router, then a network could be built around the router
    > that uses the broadband card. I have to worry that the quality of service
    > (the ability to send and receive packets of data) would be diminished in
    > an architecture like this. I recently tried to network behind a machine
    > with a broadband card used for Internet access, and it did not work. The
    > host machine (the one with the broadband card in it) reported the second
    > machine as a conflict with the IP address -- basically, it said two
    > machines with the same address is not acceptable.


    Hello Jeff,
    Today everything is back to normal and working, so I don't know what the
    problem is/was. As far as the broadband card and network, I have been
    running that configuration since December without any problems. Two
    computers, both wired to the Kyocera router which has the BB Card.

    Thanks for the reply,
    Joe
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Joe J., Jul 18, 2008
    #10
  11. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    Well, I guess it must have been their problem yesterday. All is working
    normal today on both machines.

    Thanks for your time in replying!!

    Joe
    "Paul" <> wrote in message news:g5ogg4$7ao$...
    > Joe J. wrote:
    >>>> Tried nslookup and got the following:
    >>>> SERVER: unknown
    >>>> Address: 192.168.0.1
    >>>> Unknown can't find nslookup: non-existent domain. Since I was able to
    >>>> this right now, everything is working ok, but it quit for the 3
    >>>> previous hours.
    >>>>
    >>>> Joe J
    >>> This is what mine returns. I used this command, to dump the DOS output
    >>> into
    >>> a text file. The ">" redirects STDOUT to a file.
    >>>
    >>> nslookup www.altavista.com >out.txt
    >>>
    >>> And this is the output.
    >>>
    >>> Server: UnKnown
    >>> Address: 192.168.1.1
    >>>
    >>> Name: avatw.search.yahoo2.akadns.net
    >>> Address: 72.30.186.25
    >>> Aliases: www.altavista.com
    >>>
    >>> The reason the server is unknown, is because there is no reverse mapping
    >>> for a private address (192.168.1.1). In other words, the computer asks
    >>> the router. The router in turn, consults one of the two DNS servers
    >>> it was passed, via DHCP, from the ISP. There is no symbolic equivalent
    >>> to 192.168.1.1, which is why it has to remain "UnKnown".
    >>>
    >>> But I can see the actual servers used, in my router setup page.
    >>>
    >>> The fact that I got a translation, means it worked, and one of
    >>> my two DNS servers at the ISP, was working.
    >>>
    >>> For people who have a static setup for their Windows computer, the
    >>> server name could have been translated and named, because then the
    >>> nslookup program would be dealing with a public DNS server directly.
    >>>
    >>> If you're not getting the "72.30.186.25" part of the answer, then
    >>> DNS is broken. You could talk to the staff at your ISP, for example,
    >>> to seek a resolution. I've used workarounds in the past, to avoid
    >>> phoning them :) Such as manually setting up DNS, when there is a
    >>> problem. Now that there are so many more DNS servers at my ISP, this
    >>> no longer seems to be an issue here.
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>
    >> Hi Paul,
    >>
    >> Thanks for the replies but you're now talking over my head.
    >> What does that mean the "DNS is broken"?
    >>
    >> I also don't really know who my Internet Service Provider is?
    >> I connect using a Sprint broadband card. Would Sprint be my ISP?
    >>
    >> Sorry for the dumb questions!
    >> Joe

    >
    > Somewhere, in the documentation you got from Sprint, there should
    > have been a phone number to call, to get support for your Internet
    > service. That is who you want to call now. If the conclusion is,
    > that DNS (domain name service, translating symbolic addresses, to
    > numeric addresses) is broken, then you should talk to the support
    > people.
    >
    > Another way to evaluate this. If you go to your web browser, and
    > type in
    >
    > http://www.altavista.com
    >
    > and that doesn't work ("server not found" or whatever).
    > And then you try instead,
    >
    > http://72.30.186.25
    >
    > the second format avoids the DNS translation you should have working
    > for you. Nobody wants to type in or remember numbers, which is why
    > we have symbolic addresses instead. The DNS server performs
    > the translation from the first form, to the second form. The
    > number form is needed, because numbers are stuffed into the
    > headers of each packet, indicating where the packet should
    > go.
    >
    > DNS servers are an integral part of the service. The "fat pipe"
    > to Sprint can be working, but it there is no working DNS server,
    > it'll be damned hard to get anything done.
    >
    > If your router has a WAN page in the setup for the router,
    > you might see the addresses of the DNS servers listed.
    > Keeping track of the DNS servers that are working or not
    > working, might help when you're talking to Sprint. In
    > case they offer the usual "we don't see a problem here sir"
    > kind of answer. I know I've had to do extra research work,
    > to get any kind of admission from the support at my ISP,
    > which is why I don't waste a lot of time on them.
    >
    > Paul
     
    Joe J., Jul 18, 2008
    #11
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