Internet Connection Drops Repeatedly

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by ~BD~, Mar 3, 2009.

  1. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    The article here http://kb.netgear.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1111 says:-

    Disabling Conflicting Firewalls Such as Windows XP, McAfee, Norton, or Zone
    Alarm


    Often two firewalls on the same LAN conflict. Both are trying to do the same
    job; the conflict may cause an otherwise good Internet connection to drop.
    If this happens, use the NETGEAR firewall, and disable the other. Two
    situations are described here, but the general approach applies to any
    firewall active on a NETGEAR LAN.

    The Windows firewall may be turned on without you knowing, for example, if
    the XP Network Setup Wizard was used.

    To Disable Windows' Firewall

    See Microsoft knowledgebase article: How to: Enable or Disable Internet
    Connection Firewall In Windows XP. (Note that you must be logged on as
    administrator, if you are not, no "Advanced" tab will appear as described.)
    For hints about using these Windows features, search firewall in Windows
    help, and select the article Enable or Disable Internet Connection
    Firewalls.

    ************************

    Would others here support the disablement of my Windows XP (Home SP3)
    Firewall as I'm using a Netgear DG834Gv3 router and my connection drops
    quite frequently? TIA

    --

    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 3, 2009
    #1
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  2. ~BD~

    Martin Guest

    ~BD~ wrote:

    > Would others here support the disablement of my Windows XP (Home SP3)
    > Firewall as I'm using a Netgear DG834Gv3 router and my connection drops
    > quite frequently? TIA


    Well I wouldn't, never had any issues with a firewall appliance
    interfering with a software firewall.

    What connection drops? Connection between router and ISP? Connection
    between wireless computer and router? Connection between cable computer
    and router? Conection from computer to internet even though
    computer-router and router-ISP is working fine?
    >
    > --
    >
    > Dave
    >
    >
     
    Martin, Mar 4, 2009
    #2
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  3. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    "Martin" <> wrote in message
    news:49ae7419$0$16166$...
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >
    >> Would others here support the disablement of my Windows XP (Home SP3)
    >> Firewall as I'm using a Netgear DG834Gv3 router and my connection drops
    >> quite frequently? TIA

    >
    > Well I wouldn't, never had any issues with a firewall appliance
    > interfering with a software firewall.
    >
    > What connection drops? Connection between router and ISP? Connection
    > between wireless computer and router? Connection between cable computer
    > and router? Conection from computer to internet even though
    > computer-router and router-ISP is working fine?
    >>
    >> --


    Thanks for responding, Martin.

    I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection between my
    desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the connection fails I
    then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless
    USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait for a moment or two and then plug
    it in again.

    Someone once suggested setting the router aerial to an angle of 45 degrees
    from the vertical to improve the connection. I was sceptical ........ but
    discovered that the connection *did* improve by doing this!
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 4, 2009
    #3
  4. ~BD~ wrote:

    > I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    > between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    > connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    > WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    > for a moment or two and then plug it in again.


    Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop PC and
    the router?

    Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not normally
    carry a desktop PC around the house.

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Mar 4, 2009
    #4
  5. ~BD~

    Ari® Guest

    On Wed, 4 Mar 2009 13:03:57 -0500, Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:

    > Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    > your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not normally
    > carry a desktop PC around the house.


    lol

    Kidz.
    --
    Meet Ari! http://tr.im/1fa9
    "To get concrete results, you have to be confrontational".
     
    Ari®, Mar 5, 2009
    #5
  6. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Hello bts - In line replies

    "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in message
    news:gomfqd$ahk$...
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >
    >> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.

    >
    > Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop PC and
    > the router?



    I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a very
    long telephone extention cable)


    > Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    > your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not normally
    > carry a desktop PC around the house.


    Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa 1850.
    My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms distant from my
    study where I spend my time on my computer. Because it was not easy to run
    an extention telephone cable between the telephone point and my study (so
    that I could effect an ethernet cable connection between my PC and the
    router) I decided to adopt connection wirelessly.

    My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but not
    always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to have cables
    running around the property!

    > -Friends don't let friends drive Windows


    What do *you* drive bts?

    If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 5, 2009
    #6
  7. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    "Tim Jackson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >> Hello bts - In line replies
    >>
    >> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in message
    >> news:gomfqd$ahk$...
    >>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >>>> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >>>> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >>>> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >>>> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.
    >>> Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop PC and
    >>> the router?

    >>
    >>
    >> I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a very
    >> long telephone extention cable)
    >>
    >>
    >>> Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    >>> your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not normally
    >>> carry a desktop PC around the house.

    >>
    >> Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa
    >> 1850. My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms
    >> distant from my study where I spend my time on my computer. Because it
    >> was not easy to run an extention telephone cable between the telephone
    >> point and my study (so that I could effect an ethernet cable connection
    >> between my PC and the router) I decided to adopt connection wirelessly.
    >>
    >> My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but not
    >> always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to have
    >> cables running around the property!
    >>
    >>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows

    >>
    >> What do *you* drive bts?
    >>
    >> If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?
    >> --
    >> Dave
    >>
    >>

    > Have you tried changing channels?
    >
    > Sounds like you've got another user on the same channel at a marginal
    > distance interfering with your signal.
    >
    > Turning off your router and scanning for signals with your PC might show
    > up what other signals are in the area, (or it might not - trial and error
    > is the only real test.).
    >
    > When one of the major companies installed it's wireless service in my
    > area, my long-established home wireless network was brought down because
    > their access point had taken the channel I was using.
    >
    > I would point out that wireless networks should never be seen as
    > *reliable*. However secure they are made against unauthorised access, it
    > is trivially easy to jam them. Any mission-critical communications should
    > be wired, or at least have a wired back-up.
    >
    > Computer security isn't just about keeping your secrets secret, it's also
    > about keeping your data infrastructure functional.
    >
    >
    > Tim Jackson


    Good morning Tim!

    Thanks for your response. Funnily enough, when I reset my router recently,
    the operative from AOL asked me to switch from Channel 11 to Channel 1 -
    which I did - and then supplied *me* with a new username and password which
    he said I should not change! I don't really like that, but I've left it for
    now.

    I'd reset the router to factory condition and once I had done so just could
    not get connected to the internet again without help from AOL. This is an
    area where I must develop new skills but, once up and running and there's no
    need to change things, one tends to forget exactly what one did "last time"!

    I do understand your comments regarding security with wireless connections.
    My son has confirmed that in the RAF, and when working with the USAF, *no*
    wireless connections were permitted to military equipment.

    Btw - I took the plunge yesterday and bought an iMac (whilst my wife was in
    the hairdressers!). It connected up like a dream and I was on-line within
    minutes of plugging it in! All I've got to do now is learn how to use it!
    Any help welcomed!

    Have a good day!
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 5, 2009
    #7
  8. ~BD~

    Martin Guest

    ~BD~ wrote:

    > Good morning Tim!
    >
    > Thanks for your response. Funnily enough, when I reset my router recently,
    > the operative from AOL asked me to switch from Channel 11 to Channel 1 -
    > which I did - and then supplied *me* with a new username and password which
    > he said I should not change! I don't really like that, but I've left it for
    > now.
    >
    > I'd reset the router to factory condition and once I had done so just could
    > not get connected to the internet again without help from AOL. This is an
    > area where I must develop new skills but, once up and running and there's no
    > need to change things, one tends to forget exactly what one did "last time"!


    In the nicest possible way can I suggest you stop faffing.

    Sort out one thing at time. If the connection isn't working then try a
    cable, if the internet connection is working don't phone AOL - their
    technical ability is probably lower than yours and you'll be changing
    too many things to isolate the real issue. So get yourself a long
    network cable (note: not telephone cable) and try a hard-wired
    connection between your router and PC. Make sure that connection is
    solid before trying anything else.

    Assuming the cabled connection is solid, and your internet connection is
    solid then we can start to tidy up the house again (I know you'll be
    getting flak from the misses for having a cable running round the
    house). So, once you know the router is working with cable and your ISP
    is working with the router we can start to look at the wireless side.

    Ignore the bit about running a software firewall with your router
    firewall, the two do totally different jobs and you need both. Just
    don't try to run more than one s/w firewall. However turn the s/w one
    off for testing if you wish.

    If you're in a stone built cottage with thick walls you might be in
    trouble if you're two rooms away. One of my clients was in an old
    building like that and we couldn't go drilling holes through walls to
    feed conduits so went with wireless, it was a nightmare getting it to
    work - and we did have to run one cable around the building.

    What's your signal strength and bit-rates on your wireless card in the
    PC? How many bars on the signal strength meter - might be in the tray
    next to the little clock on the bottom-right-hand of the screen.
     
    Martin, Mar 5, 2009
    #8
  9. ~BD~ wrote:

    > Hello bts - In line replies


    Thanks, but you don't need to mention that.

    > "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >>> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >>> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >>> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >>> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.

    >>
    >> Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop PC
    >> and the router?

    >
    > I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a
    > very long telephone extention cable)


    Telephone extension cable? I would think you would be using a CAT 5 or 6
    Ethernet network cable, right? This is DSL ... and in my experience
    would use CAT5/6 between computer and modem the same as my RoadRunner
    cable modem.

    >> Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    >> your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not
    >> normally carry a desktop PC around the house.

    >
    > Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa
    > 1850.


    I have experience with that, having lived many years in an 1823
    cobblestone farmhouse until last year.

    > My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms
    > distant from my study where I spend my time on my computer. Because
    > it was not easy to run an extention telephone cable between the
    > telephone point and my study (so that I could effect an ethernet
    > cable connection between my PC and the router) I decided to adopt
    > connection wirelessly.


    Ah. Here you say Ethernet cable. Using the term 'telephone extension'
    above was misleading. Anyway, I ran my Ethernet cable from my office
    down into the crawlspace, to outside, to tucked in under the bottom row
    of cobbles, back into the crawlspace at the other end of the house and
    up through the floor where the cable modem was located. It was about 150
    feet long.

    > My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but
    > not always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to
    > have cables running around the property!


    That part is understood.

    >> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows

    >
    > What do *you* drive bts?


    Ubuntu Linux, version 8.04.

    > If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?


    Nope, never owned either an Apple or a Mac. I use (my only Windows
    program) 40tude Dialog running in Wine. I also have set up Pan, XPN,
    Thunderbird, and Opera for news.

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Mar 5, 2009
    #9
  10. Martin wrote:

    > .. One of my clients was in an old building like that and we couldn't
    > go drilling holes through walls to feed conduits so went with
    > wireless, it was a nightmare getting it to work - and we did have to
    > run one cable around the building.


    I never even bothered to try wireless in my cobblestone house (mentioned
    in another post just now). I did the same, going outside with the cable.
    My walls were eighteen inches thick.

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Mar 5, 2009
    #10
  11. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Martin wrote:
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >
    >> Good morning Tim!
    >>
    >> Thanks for your response. Funnily enough, when I reset my router
    >> recently, the operative from AOL asked me to switch from Channel 11 to
    >> Channel 1 - which I did - and then supplied *me* with a new username
    >> and password which he said I should not change! I don't really like
    >> that, but I've left it for now.
    >>
    >> I'd reset the router to factory condition and once I had done so just
    >> could not get connected to the internet again without help from AOL.
    >> This is an area where I must develop new skills but, once up and
    >> running and there's no need to change things, one tends to forget
    >> exactly what one did "last time"!

    >
    > In the nicest possible way can I suggest you stop faffing.


    You may ....... and you did! :)


    > Sort out one thing at time. If the connection isn't working then try a
    > cable, if the internet connection is working don't phone AOL - their
    > technical ability is probably lower than yours and you'll be changing
    > too many things to isolate the real issue. So get yourself a long
    > network cable (note: not telephone cable) and try a hard-wired
    > connection between your router and PC. Make sure that connection is
    > solid before trying anything else.
    >
    > Assuming the cabled connection is solid, and your internet connection is
    > solid then we can start to tidy up the house again (I know you'll be
    > getting flak from the misses for having a cable running round the
    > house). So, once you know the router is working with cable and your ISP
    > is working with the router we can start to look at the wireless side.



    The Ethernet cable I have is only about one metre long. I've either used
    a long telephone extension cable to bring the router close to my PC and
    then connected the router to my PC with the Ethernet cable OR taken our
    laptop to be close to the usual location of the router and connected the
    laptop to the router with the Ethernet cable.

    When done, today, the connection is "solid".

    My new iMac has remained connected, wirelessly, all day with no dropping
    of the wireless connection. Our laptop is also connected wirelessly
    with no dropping off! :)))

    So, it may well be that the "problem" has been with my PC, which - for
    the time being - has been withdrawn from service!



    > Ignore the bit about running a software firewall with your router
    > firewall, the two do totally different jobs and you need both. Just
    > don't try to run more than one s/w firewall. However turn the s/w one
    > off for testing if you wish.



    Noted - thank you.


    > > If you're in a stone built cottage with thick walls you might be in

    > trouble if you're two rooms away. One of my clients was in an old
    > building like that and we couldn't go drilling holes through walls to
    > feed conduits so went with wireless, it was a nightmare getting it to
    > work - and we did have to run one cable around the building.



    I'm just a user - trying to learn as much as I can - so as to avoid
    having to employ a professional like you! ;)



    > What's your signal strength and bit-rates on your wireless card in the
    > PC? How many bars on the signal strength meter - might be in the tray
    > next to the little clock on the bottom-right-hand of the screen.



    I can only refer to the laptop at the moment where the signal strength
    is 61% (4 bars) at 54 Mbps

    HTH

    I think it probably best to see how things pan out using the Mac before
    considering making some provision for hard wiring at considerable expense!

    Thanks for your helpful comments though, Martin. Much appreciated.
    --
    Dave

    D
     
    ~BD~, Mar 5, 2009
    #11
  12. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Tim Jackson wrote:
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >> "Tim Jackson" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>> Hello bts - In line replies
    >>>>
    >>>> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:gomfqd$ahk$...
    >>>>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >>>>>> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >>>>>> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >>>>>> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >>>>>> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.
    >>>>> Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop
    >>>>> PC and
    >>>>> the router?
    >>>>
    >>>> I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a
    >>>> very long telephone extention cable)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    >>>>> your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not
    >>>>> normally
    >>>>> carry a desktop PC around the house.
    >>>> Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa
    >>>> 1850. My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms
    >>>> distant from my study where I spend my time on my computer. Because
    >>>> it was not easy to run an extention telephone cable between the
    >>>> telephone point and my study (so that I could effect an ethernet
    >>>> cable connection between my PC and the router) I decided to adopt
    >>>> connection wirelessly.
    >>>>
    >>>> My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but
    >>>> not always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to
    >>>> have cables running around the property!
    >>>>
    >>>>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
    >>>> What do *you* drive bts?
    >>>>
    >>>> If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?
    >>>> --
    >>>> Dave
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Have you tried changing channels?
    >>>
    >>> Sounds like you've got another user on the same channel at a marginal
    >>> distance interfering with your signal.
    >>>
    >>> Turning off your router and scanning for signals with your PC might
    >>> show up what other signals are in the area, (or it might not - trial
    >>> and error is the only real test.).
    >>>
    >>> When one of the major companies installed it's wireless service in my
    >>> area, my long-established home wireless network was brought down
    >>> because their access point had taken the channel I was using.
    >>>
    >>> I would point out that wireless networks should never be seen as
    >>> *reliable*. However secure they are made against unauthorised
    >>> access, it is trivially easy to jam them. Any mission-critical
    >>> communications should be wired, or at least have a wired back-up.
    >>>
    >>> Computer security isn't just about keeping your secrets secret, it's
    >>> also about keeping your data infrastructure functional.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Tim Jackson

    >>
    >> Good morning Tim!
    >>
    >> Thanks for your response. Funnily enough, when I reset my router
    >> recently, the operative from AOL asked me to switch from Channel 11 to
    >> Channel 1 - which I did - and then supplied *me* with a new username
    >> and password which he said I should not change! I don't really like
    >> that, but I've left it for now.
    >>
    >> I'd reset the router to factory condition and once I had done so just
    >> could not get connected to the internet again without help from AOL.
    >> This is an area where I must develop new skills but, once up and
    >> running and there's no need to change things, one tends to forget
    >> exactly what one did "last time"!
    >>
    >> I do understand your comments regarding security with wireless
    >> connections. My son has confirmed that in the RAF, and when working
    >> with the USAF, *no* wireless connections were permitted to military
    >> equipment.
    >>
    >> Btw - I took the plunge yesterday and bought an iMac (whilst my wife
    >> was in the hairdressers!). It connected up like a dream and I was
    >> on-line within minutes of plugging it in! All I've got to do now is
    >> learn how to use it! Any help welcomed!
    >>
    >> Have a good day!
    >> --
    >> Dave
    >>

    >
    > AOL are specifying the channel and configuration you have to use for
    > your *local* wireless network that connects your computers to your
    > router? That sounds like unnecessary micro-management to me.



    I agree - but I suppose they have lots of experience with
    less-than-sophisticated customers who don't take much interest in the
    technicalities.



    > But then nothing AOL did would really surprise me.




    The UK company is now owned by Carphone Warehouse - maybe they will
    maintain profitability by the charges for the cost of calls to their
    'help' line!


    > Is your router using a wireless connection from the router to the
    > network too, or are we talking wired connection like ADSL or cable (or a
    > different band, like GSM)? In the former case one obviously has to
    > avoid conflict with the public access point.



    My computers connect wirelessly to the router. The router has a cable
    connection to my BT telephone socket. Nothing else is available down
    here in this part of Devon!

    HTH
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 5, 2009
    #12
  13. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >
    >> Hello bts - In line replies

    >
    > Thanks, but you don't need to mention that.
    >
    >> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >>>> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >>>> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >>>> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >>>> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.
    >>> Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop PC
    >>> and the router?

    >> I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a
    >> very long telephone extention cable)

    >
    > Telephone extension cable? I would think you would be using a CAT 5 or 6
    > Ethernet network cable, right? This is DSL ... and in my experience
    > would use CAT5/6 between computer and modem the same as my RoadRunner
    > cable modem.
    >
    >>> Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    >>> your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not
    >>> normally carry a desktop PC around the house.

    >> Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa
    >> 1850.

    >
    > I have experience with that, having lived many years in an 1823
    > cobblestone farmhouse until last year.
    >
    >> My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms
    >> distant from my study where I spend my time on my computer. Because
    >> it was not easy to run an extention telephone cable between the
    >> telephone point and my study (so that I could effect an ethernet
    >> cable connection between my PC and the router) I decided to adopt
    >> connection wirelessly.

    >
    > Ah. Here you say Ethernet cable. Using the term 'telephone extension'
    > above was misleading. Anyway, I ran my Ethernet cable from my office
    > down into the crawlspace, to outside, to tucked in under the bottom row
    > of cobbles, back into the crawlspace at the other end of the house and
    > up through the floor where the cable modem was located. It was about 150
    > feet long.
    >
    >> My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but
    >> not always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to
    >> have cables running around the property!

    >
    > That part is understood.
    >
    >>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows

    >> What do *you* drive bts?

    >
    > Ubuntu Linux, version 8.04.
    >
    >> If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?

    >
    > Nope, never owned either an Apple or a Mac. I use (my only Windows
    > program) 40tude Dialog running in Wine. I also have set up Pan, XPN,
    > Thunderbird, and Opera for news.
    >



    Thanks for you comments, Bts :)

    I've had a dabble with Ubuntu but felt it was going to be a steep
    learning curve. I have the set-up CD - maybe I'll try again after I've
    got to grips with this iMac! (so far, it's magical!)
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 5, 2009
    #13
  14. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >
    >> Hello bts - In line replies

    >
    > Thanks, but you don't need to mention that.
    >
    >> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >>>> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >>>> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >>>> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >>>> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.
    >>> Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop PC
    >>> and the router?

    >> I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a
    >> very long telephone extention cable)

    >
    > Telephone extension cable? I would think you would be using a CAT 5 or 6
    > Ethernet network cable, right? This is DSL ... and in my experience
    > would use CAT5/6 between computer and modem the same as my RoadRunner
    > cable modem.
    >
    >>> Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    >>> your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not
    >>> normally carry a desktop PC around the house.

    >> Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa
    >> 1850.

    >
    > I have experience with that, having lived many years in an 1823
    > cobblestone farmhouse until last year.
    >
    >> My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms
    >> distant from my study where I spend my time on my computer. Because
    >> it was not easy to run an extention telephone cable between the
    >> telephone point and my study (so that I could effect an ethernet
    >> cable connection between my PC and the router) I decided to adopt
    >> connection wirelessly.

    >
    > Ah. Here you say Ethernet cable. Using the term 'telephone extension'
    > above was misleading. Anyway, I ran my Ethernet cable from my office
    > down into the crawlspace, to outside, to tucked in under the bottom row
    > of cobbles, back into the crawlspace at the other end of the house and
    > up through the floor where the cable modem was located. It was about 150
    > feet long.
    >
    >> My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but
    >> not always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to
    >> have cables running around the property!

    >
    > That part is understood.
    >
    >>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows

    >> What do *you* drive bts?

    >
    > Ubuntu Linux, version 8.04.
    >
    >> If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?

    >
    > Nope, never owned either an Apple or a Mac. I use (my only Windows
    > program) 40tude Dialog running in Wine. I also have set up Pan, XPN,
    > Thunderbird, and Opera for news.
    >



    Thanks for you comments, Bts :)

    I've had a dabble with Ubuntu but felt it was going to be a steep
    learning curve. I have the set-up CD - maybe I'll try again after I've
    got to grips with this iMac! (so far, it's magical!)
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 7, 2009
    #14
  15. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Tim Jackson wrote:
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >> "Tim Jackson" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>> Hello bts - In line replies
    >>>>
    >>>> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:gomfqd$ahk$...
    >>>>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >>>>>> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >>>>>> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >>>>>> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >>>>>> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.
    >>>>> Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop
    >>>>> PC and
    >>>>> the router?
    >>>>
    >>>> I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a
    >>>> very long telephone extention cable)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    >>>>> your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not
    >>>>> normally
    >>>>> carry a desktop PC around the house.
    >>>> Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa
    >>>> 1850. My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms
    >>>> distant from my study where I spend my time on my computer. Because
    >>>> it was not easy to run an extention telephone cable between the
    >>>> telephone point and my study (so that I could effect an ethernet
    >>>> cable connection between my PC and the router) I decided to adopt
    >>>> connection wirelessly.
    >>>>
    >>>> My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but
    >>>> not always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to
    >>>> have cables running around the property!
    >>>>
    >>>>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
    >>>> What do *you* drive bts?
    >>>>
    >>>> If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?
    >>>> --
    >>>> Dave
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Have you tried changing channels?
    >>>
    >>> Sounds like you've got another user on the same channel at a marginal
    >>> distance interfering with your signal.
    >>>
    >>> Turning off your router and scanning for signals with your PC might
    >>> show up what other signals are in the area, (or it might not - trial
    >>> and error is the only real test.).
    >>>
    >>> When one of the major companies installed it's wireless service in my
    >>> area, my long-established home wireless network was brought down
    >>> because their access point had taken the channel I was using.
    >>>
    >>> I would point out that wireless networks should never be seen as
    >>> *reliable*. However secure they are made against unauthorised
    >>> access, it is trivially easy to jam them. Any mission-critical
    >>> communications should be wired, or at least have a wired back-up.
    >>>
    >>> Computer security isn't just about keeping your secrets secret, it's
    >>> also about keeping your data infrastructure functional.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Tim Jackson

    >>
    >> Good morning Tim!
    >>
    >> Thanks for your response. Funnily enough, when I reset my router
    >> recently, the operative from AOL asked me to switch from Channel 11 to
    >> Channel 1 - which I did - and then supplied *me* with a new username
    >> and password which he said I should not change! I don't really like
    >> that, but I've left it for now.
    >>
    >> I'd reset the router to factory condition and once I had done so just
    >> could not get connected to the internet again without help from AOL.
    >> This is an area where I must develop new skills but, once up and
    >> running and there's no need to change things, one tends to forget
    >> exactly what one did "last time"!
    >>
    >> I do understand your comments regarding security with wireless
    >> connections. My son has confirmed that in the RAF, and when working
    >> with the USAF, *no* wireless connections were permitted to military
    >> equipment.
    >>
    >> Btw - I took the plunge yesterday and bought an iMac (whilst my wife
    >> was in the hairdressers!). It connected up like a dream and I was
    >> on-line within minutes of plugging it in! All I've got to do now is
    >> learn how to use it! Any help welcomed!
    >>
    >> Have a good day!
    >> --
    >> Dave
    >>

    >
    > AOL are specifying the channel and configuration you have to use for
    > your *local* wireless network that connects your computers to your
    > router? That sounds like unnecessary micro-management to me.



    I agree - but I suppose they have lots of experience with
    less-than-sophisticated customers who don't take much interest in the
    technicalities.



    > But then nothing AOL did would really surprise me.




    The UK company is now owned by Carphone Warehouse - maybe they will
    maintain profitability by virtue of the charges for the cost of calls to
    their 'help' line!


    > Is your router using a wireless connection from the router to the
    > network too, or are we talking wired connection like ADSL or cable (or a
    > different band, like GSM)? In the former case one obviously has to
    > avoid conflict with the public access point.



    My computers connect wirelessly to the router. The router has a cable
    connection to my BT telephone socket. Nothing else is available down
    here in this part of Devon!

    HTH
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 7, 2009
    #15
  16. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >
    >> Hello bts - In line replies

    >
    > Thanks, but you don't need to mention that.
    >
    >> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >>>> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >>>> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >>>> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >>>> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.
    >>> Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop PC
    >>> and the router?

    >> I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a
    >> very long telephone extention cable)

    >
    > Telephone extension cable? I would think you would be using a CAT 5 or 6
    > Ethernet network cable, right? This is DSL ... and in my experience
    > would use CAT5/6 between computer and modem the same as my RoadRunner
    > cable modem.
    >
    >>> Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    >>> your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not
    >>> normally carry a desktop PC around the house.

    >> Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa
    >> 1850.

    >
    > I have experience with that, having lived many years in an 1823
    > cobblestone farmhouse until last year.
    >
    >> My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms
    >> distant from my study where I spend my time on my computer. Because
    >> it was not easy to run an extention telephone cable between the
    >> telephone point and my study (so that I could effect an ethernet
    >> cable connection between my PC and the router) I decided to adopt
    >> connection wirelessly.

    >
    > Ah. Here you say Ethernet cable. Using the term 'telephone extension'
    > above was misleading. Anyway, I ran my Ethernet cable from my office
    > down into the crawlspace, to outside, to tucked in under the bottom row
    > of cobbles, back into the crawlspace at the other end of the house and
    > up through the floor where the cable modem was located. It was about 150
    > feet long.
    >
    >> My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but
    >> not always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to
    >> have cables running around the property!

    >
    > That part is understood.
    >
    >>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows

    >> What do *you* drive bts?

    >
    > Ubuntu Linux, version 8.04.
    >
    >> If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?

    >
    > Nope, never owned either an Apple or a Mac. I use (my only Windows
    > program) 40tude Dialog running in Wine. I also have set up Pan, XPN,
    > Thunderbird, and Opera for news.
    >



    Thanks for you comments, Bts :)

    I've had a dabble with Ubuntu but felt it was going to be a steep
    learning curve. I have the set-up CD - maybe I'll try again after I've
    got to grips with this iMac! (so far, it's magical!)
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 7, 2009
    #16
  17. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >
    >> Hello bts - In line replies

    >
    > Thanks, but you don't need to mention that.
    >
    >> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >>>> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >>>> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >>>> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >>>> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.
    >>> Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop PC
    >>> and the router?

    >> I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a
    >> very long telephone extention cable)

    >
    > Telephone extension cable? I would think you would be using a CAT 5 or 6
    > Ethernet network cable, right? This is DSL ... and in my experience
    > would use CAT5/6 between computer and modem the same as my RoadRunner
    > cable modem.
    >
    >>> Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    >>> your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not
    >>> normally carry a desktop PC around the house.

    >> Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa
    >> 1850.

    >
    > I have experience with that, having lived many years in an 1823
    > cobblestone farmhouse until last year.
    >
    >> My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms
    >> distant from my study where I spend my time on my computer. Because
    >> it was not easy to run an extention telephone cable between the
    >> telephone point and my study (so that I could effect an ethernet
    >> cable connection between my PC and the router) I decided to adopt
    >> connection wirelessly.

    >
    > Ah. Here you say Ethernet cable. Using the term 'telephone extension'
    > above was misleading. Anyway, I ran my Ethernet cable from my office
    > down into the crawlspace, to outside, to tucked in under the bottom row
    > of cobbles, back into the crawlspace at the other end of the house and
    > up through the floor where the cable modem was located. It was about 150
    > feet long.
    >
    >> My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but
    >> not always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to
    >> have cables running around the property!

    >
    > That part is understood.
    >
    >>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows

    >> What do *you* drive bts?

    >
    > Ubuntu Linux, version 8.04.
    >
    >> If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?

    >
    > Nope, never owned either an Apple or a Mac. I use (my only Windows
    > program) 40tude Dialog running in Wine. I also have set up Pan, XPN,
    > Thunderbird, and Opera for news.
    >



    Thanks for you comments, Bts :)

    I've had a dabble with Ubuntu but felt it was going to be a steep
    learning curve. I have the set-up CD - maybe I'll try again after I've
    got to grips with this iMac! (so far, it's magical!)
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 7, 2009
    #17
  18. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Tim Jackson wrote:
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >> "Tim Jackson" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>> Hello bts - In line replies
    >>>>
    >>>> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:gomfqd$ahk$...
    >>>>> ~BD~ wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I'm sorry for not being specific. It is the wireless connection
    >>>>>> between my desktop PC and my router which keeps dropping. If the
    >>>>>> connection fails I then have to unplug my wireless adapter (Netgear
    >>>>>> WG111T 108 Mbps Wireless USB 2.0 Adapter) from its USB socket, wait
    >>>>>> for a moment or two and then plug it in again.
    >>>>> Does your connection drop if you use a cable between this desktop
    >>>>> PC and
    >>>>> the router?
    >>>>
    >>>> I don't think so, but it has been a long time since I tried (using a
    >>>> very long telephone extention cable)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Aside: what is the reason for using your desktop PC as wireless? Are
    >>>>> your Netgear router and the PC not close by? IME, one does not
    >>>>> normally
    >>>>> carry a desktop PC around the house.
    >>>> Not really difficult! I live in an old, brick-built, cottage - circa
    >>>> 1850. My router is located close to the telephone point, two rooms
    >>>> distant from my study where I spend my time on my computer. Because
    >>>> it was not easy to run an extention telephone cable between the
    >>>> telephone point and my study (so that I could effect an ethernet
    >>>> cable connection between my PC and the router) I decided to adopt
    >>>> connection wirelessly.
    >>>>
    >>>> My wife also connects with her laptop, also wirelessly, often (but
    >>>> not always) from an upstairs bedroom so it is very convenient not to
    >>>> have cables running around the property!
    >>>>
    >>>>> -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
    >>>> What do *you* drive bts?
    >>>>
    >>>> If an Apple Mac - what programme do you use for newsgroups?
    >>>> --
    >>>> Dave
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Have you tried changing channels?
    >>>
    >>> Sounds like you've got another user on the same channel at a marginal
    >>> distance interfering with your signal.
    >>>
    >>> Turning off your router and scanning for signals with your PC might
    >>> show up what other signals are in the area, (or it might not - trial
    >>> and error is the only real test.).
    >>>
    >>> When one of the major companies installed it's wireless service in my
    >>> area, my long-established home wireless network was brought down
    >>> because their access point had taken the channel I was using.
    >>>
    >>> I would point out that wireless networks should never be seen as
    >>> *reliable*. However secure they are made against unauthorised
    >>> access, it is trivially easy to jam them. Any mission-critical
    >>> communications should be wired, or at least have a wired back-up.
    >>>
    >>> Computer security isn't just about keeping your secrets secret, it's
    >>> also about keeping your data infrastructure functional.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Tim Jackson

    >>
    >> Good morning Tim!
    >>
    >> Thanks for your response. Funnily enough, when I reset my router
    >> recently, the operative from AOL asked me to switch from Channel 11 to
    >> Channel 1 - which I did - and then supplied *me* with a new username
    >> and password which he said I should not change! I don't really like
    >> that, but I've left it for now.
    >>
    >> I'd reset the router to factory condition and once I had done so just
    >> could not get connected to the internet again without help from AOL.
    >> This is an area where I must develop new skills but, once up and
    >> running and there's no need to change things, one tends to forget
    >> exactly what one did "last time"!
    >>
    >> I do understand your comments regarding security with wireless
    >> connections. My son has confirmed that in the RAF, and when working
    >> with the USAF, *no* wireless connections were permitted to military
    >> equipment.
    >>
    >> Btw - I took the plunge yesterday and bought an iMac (whilst my wife
    >> was in the hairdressers!). It connected up like a dream and I was
    >> on-line within minutes of plugging it in! All I've got to do now is
    >> learn how to use it! Any help welcomed!
    >>
    >> Have a good day!
    >> --
    >> Dave
    >>

    >
    > AOL are specifying the channel and configuration you have to use for
    > your *local* wireless network that connects your computers to your
    > router? That sounds like unnecessary micro-management to me.



    I agree - but I suppose they have lots of experience with
    less-than-sophisticated customers who don't take much interest in the
    technicalities.



    > But then nothing AOL did would really surprise me.




    The UK company is now owned by Carphone Warehouse - maybe they will
    maintain profitability by the charges for the cost of calls to their
    'help' line!


    > Is your router using a wireless connection from the router to the
    > network too, or are we talking wired connection like ADSL or cable (or a
    > different band, like GSM)? In the former case one obviously has to
    > avoid conflict with the public access point.



    My computers connect wirelessly to the router. The router has a cable
    connection to my BT telephone socket. Nothing else is available down
    here in this part of Devon!

    HTH
    --
    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 7, 2009
    #18
  19. ~BD~ wrote:

    > Thanks for you comments, Bts :)


    You're welcome, but *please* remove these stuck messages from your Out-
    or Send box! You've now sent four copies of this one, in a 27-hour
    period.

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Mar 8, 2009
    #19
  20. ~BD~

    ~BD~ Guest

    Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > ~BD~ wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for you comments, Bts :)

    >
    > You're welcome, but *please* remove these stuck messages from your Out-
    > or Send box! You've now sent four copies of this one, in a 27-hour
    > period.
    >


    I sincerely apologise (to all!)

    Whilst I recognised that Ubuntu was going to be a steep learning curve,
    I've ended up using Thunderbird on my new iMac for posting to this
    newsgroup. It *is* somewhat different to using Outlook Express - the
    programme I've been used to!

    I hope that I've succeeded in removing the excess messages.

    Enjoy your day! :)
    --

    Dave
     
    ~BD~, Mar 8, 2009
    #20
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