Interesting OT follow up to pigeon camera

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by philo , Nov 7, 2012.

  1. philo 

    philo  Guest

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  2. philo 

    philo  Guest

    On 11/07/2012 02:16 AM, Eric Stevens wrote:
    > On Tue, 6 Nov 2012 21:51:29 -0800, Savageduck
    > <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2012-11-06 21:24:20 -0800, philo <"philo "@privacy.net> said:
    >>
    >>> http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012...sage-found-on-pigeon-remains/?test=latestnews

    >>
    >> Yup!
    >>>

    >> There are still interesting WWII stories out there. However, to keep
    >> the code, or the message secret after 68 years is a little bit silly.
    >> Especially since it probably relates to troop movements on June 6,
    >> 1944, and that is history now.
    >>
    >> ...unless the message was an embarrassing request for a tea delivery
    >> and the break which would inevitably accompany such a delivery. ;-)

    >
    > There is quite a bit which is still classified ranging from the file
    > on Heinrich Himmler's death and Rudolf Hess's flight to Scotland, to
    > the records of the 67th Chemical Warfare Company, Royal Engineers, for
    > June 1940 to 1942, all of which have been sealed for 100 years. I'm
    > sure there is a lot more.
    >



    I'd think even the most sensitive of papers could be made public after
    50 years

    --
    https://www.createspace.com/3707686
     
    philo , Nov 7, 2012
    #2
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  3. philo 

    Martin Brown Guest

    On 07/11/2012 05:51, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2012-11-06 21:24:20 -0800, philo <"philo "@privacy.net> said:
    >
    >> http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012...sage-found-on-pigeon-remains/?test=latestnews

    >
    > Yup!
    >>

    > There are still interesting WWII stories out there. However, to keep the
    > code, or the message secret after 68 years is a little bit silly.


    Not necessarily. Some of the Bletchley code breakers tricks are
    classified for very good reasons. Namely that they still work today.

    It is only recently that general purpose computers have reached the same
    computational power for codebreaking as Turings finest machines. Despite
    being mechanical, Heath Robinson and somewhat temperamental they were
    incredibly good at what they did.

    > Especially since it probably relates to troop movements on June 6, 1944,
    > and that is history now.


    It could still be interesting to know what it said. If a decoding pad
    can be found - they may not tell us if they can read it though.

    Some stuff from WWII is embargoed for a century.

    > ...unless the message was an embarrassing request for a tea delivery and
    > the break which would inevitably accompany such a delivery. ;-)
    >


    I don't think they would bother to encypher mundane traffic.

    Could be a challenge to decode it today if as seems likely it was a one
    time pad used to encode it.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown
     
    Martin Brown, Nov 7, 2012
    #3
  4. philo 

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Wed, 07 Nov 2012 12:56:54 +0000, Martin Brown
    <|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    : On 07/11/2012 05:51, Savageduck wrote:
    : > On 2012-11-06 21:24:20 -0800, philo <"philo "@privacy.net> said:
    : >
    : >> http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012...sage-found-on-pigeon-remains/?test=latestnews
    : >
    : > Yup!
    : >>
    : > There are still interesting WWII stories out there. However, to keep the
    : > code, or the message secret after 68 years is a little bit silly.
    :
    : Not necessarily. Some of the Bletchley code breakers tricks are
    : classified for very good reasons. Namely that they still work today.
    :
    : It is only recently that general purpose computers have reached the same
    : computational power for codebreaking as Turings finest machines. Despite
    : being mechanical, Heath Robinson and somewhat temperamental they were
    : incredibly good at what they did.
    :
    : > Especially since it probably relates to troop movements on June 6, 1944,
    : > and that is history now.
    :
    : It could still be interesting to know what it said. If a decoding pad
    : can be found - they may not tell us if they can read it though.
    :
    : Some stuff from WWII is embargoed for a century.
    :
    : > ...unless the message was an embarrassing request for a tea delivery and
    : > the break which would inevitably accompany such a delivery. ;-)
    : >
    :
    : I don't think they would bother to encypher mundane traffic.

    They might. The reasoning would be that if a message fell into the hands of
    the enemy, you want them to have to work just as hard to try to decrypt the
    chaff as the good stuff. You'd have to feel that your encryption was pretty
    good, though, since you're giving the enemy a larger sample size to work with.

    : Could be a challenge to decode it today if as seems likely it was a one
    : time pad used to encode it.

    I don't think it would be much of a challenge for a properly equipped
    professional cryptographer. Keys were shorter then, because the amount of
    computing power you could bring to bear on encryption and decryption was much
    smaller than it is today.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Nov 7, 2012
    #4
  5. philo 

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/7/2012 7:56 AM, Martin Brown wrote:
    > On 07/11/2012 05:51, Savageduck wrote:
    >> On 2012-11-06 21:24:20 -0800, philo <"philo "@privacy.net> said:
    >>
    >>> http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012...sage-found-on-pigeon-remains/?test=latestnews
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yup!
    >>>

    >> There are still interesting WWII stories out there. However, to keep the
    >> code, or the message secret after 68 years is a little bit silly.

    >
    > Not necessarily. Some of the Bletchley code breakers tricks are
    > classified for very good reasons. Namely that they still work today.
    >
    > It is only recently that general purpose computers have reached the same
    > computational power for codebreaking as Turings finest machines. Despite
    > being mechanical, Heath Robinson and somewhat temperamental they were
    > incredibly good at what they did.
    >
    >> Especially since it probably relates to troop movements on June 6, 1944,
    >> and that is history now.

    >
    > It could still be interesting to know what it said. If a decoding pad
    > can be found - they may not tell us if they can read it though.
    >
    > Some stuff from WWII is embargoed for a century.
    >
    >> ...unless the message was an embarrassing request for a tea delivery and
    >> the break which would inevitably accompany such a delivery. ;-)
    >>

    >
    > I don't think they would bother to encypher mundane traffic.


    Were you ever in any branch of the armed forces? :)

    I our MP battalion had a two sets of Jeeps, with identical numbers
    painted on the vehicles.
    One was used for training, and the other for inspections.




    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Nov 7, 2012
    #5
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