Intel i7 3930K - question about clocking

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Netman, Sep 9, 2011.

  1. Netman

    Netman Guest

    Hello!

    I am interested in overclocking future Intel i7 3930K
    processor which will be realeased Nov 15th 2011.

    On the following page:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGA_2011

    I have read that this processor has "limited unlock".

    I don`t know if we have to say about it regarding
    to games or overclocking.

    Can you tell me how many Ghz can be overclocked
    in this processor using middle cost cooler or high cost
    coolers? I`m not interested on cooling using nitrogen.

    I know that this processor haven`t been realesed yet
    but people that overclocked processors can say
    approximately how many more Ghz can be achieved.

    Thank you in advance
    Netm.
     
    Netman, Sep 9, 2011
    #1
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  2. Netman

    Netman Guest

    Uzytkownik "Robert Baer" <> napisal w wiadomosci
    news:...
    > Netman wrote:
    >> Hello!
    >>
    >> I am interested in overclocking future Intel i7 3930K
    >> processor which will be realeased Nov 15th 2011.
    >>
    >> On the following page:
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGA_2011
    >>
    >> I have read that this processor has "limited unlock".
    >>
    >> I don`t know if we have to say about it regarding
    >> to games or overclocking.
    >>
    >> Can you tell me how many Ghz can be overclocked
    >> in this processor using middle cost cooler or high cost
    >> coolers? I`m not interested on cooling using nitrogen.
    >>
    >> I know that this processor haven`t been realesed yet
    >> but people that overclocked processors can say
    >> approximately how many more Ghz can be achieved.
    >>
    >> Thank you in advance
    >> Netm.

    > I cannot say, but i think you should not look at it on the basis of "how
    > much in terms of clock rate", but on the basis of "percent of base or
    > nominal rate".
    > That way, you can take the data of various other CPUs to derive "useful"
    > overclock percentages and perhaps make a graph, horizontal being
    > base/nominal rate and vertical being percentage.
    > That way, you most likely will see a thin "fan" shape increasing with
    > clock rate, or a "fat" distribution with an average line going up with
    > clock rate.
    > Shoot, if you want to make a book-like presentation, start with 286,
    > then 386, then 486, then Pentium CPUs; one set using a box for Intel data
    > points and circles for AMD data points; could be VERY instructive to you
    > and everyone else.
    > Should tell you what to expect in the future.


    Is it true that the processor overclocking is
    not good for liveness of the processor?
    Is it true that such overclocked processor
    uses up quciker? I mean physics look of
    such overclocking. Higher temperature
    is not a good thing for such processor,
    isn`t it?

    Thank you for help
    Netm
     
    Netman, Sep 13, 2011
    #2
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  3. Netman

    Paul Guest

    Netman wrote:

    >
    > Is it true that the processor overclocking is
    > not good for liveness of the processor?
    > Is it true that such overclocked processor
    > uses up quciker? I mean physics look of
    > such overclocking. Higher temperature
    > is not a good thing for such processor,
    > isn`t it?
    >
    > Thank you for help
    > Netm


    This is an effect to look for.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromigration

    If you increase VCore enough, while overclocking, the
    processor can die overnight.

    The last time I saw evidence of Electromigration,
    was what some users of AMD processors were seeing over
    on one of the enthusiast forums. They discovered their
    processor had a high overclock to start, and gradually
    the stable frequency dropped and dropped. (This would be
    over a period of weeks.) At one point, the processor
    would not even run at the stock frequency, and the owner
    said "then I sold it on Ebay". And those would be symptoms
    of a process like electromigration and the thinning of
    conductors on the die.

    To move dopants around on the silicon die, would require
    higher temperatures, and the THERMTRIP safety feature
    that turns off the PC, prevents reaching a temperature
    that would cause diffusion. Which leaves electromigration
    in the conductors as a potential mechanism.

    The processor should be good to the peak frequency sold at
    retail, so if you buy a 3GHz processor, and the fastest one
    is 3.6GHz for sale, then you'd know it was completely safe
    to bump your 3GHz processor to 3.6GHz. But if you bumped
    any of those processors (3.0GHz or the 3.6GHz one) to
    5GHz, you don't really know whether the electromigration
    design rules took into account operation at that
    frequency. If they did not, the processor would slowly
    degrade, due to current density and temperature. If the
    conductors were big enough, then it might be just fine,
    for a long time.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Sep 14, 2011
    #3
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