Integrity of MSWord files

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz, Sep 24, 2005.

  1. I want to transfer MSWord files to another computer to access a
    laser printer. Acrobat is not available.

    I understand that when MSWord files are opened on another
    computer the default setting of the client machine take precedence.
    This almost always leads to altered formatting and possible font
    substitution.

    I accept it may be necessary to pre- load some fonts to avoid
    font substitution.

    Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    formatting of the original document ?
     
    lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz, Sep 24, 2005
    #1
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  2. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz

    Peter Guest

    lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz wrote:
    > I want to transfer MSWord files to another computer to access a
    > laser printer. Acrobat is not available.


    It would really be easy to do this with pdf files. There are free pdf
    writers available, such as
    http://www.cutepdf.com/

    HTH

    Peter
     
    Peter, Sep 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz

    Crash Guest

    lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz wrote:
    > I want to transfer MSWord files to another computer to access a
    > laser printer. Acrobat is not available.
    >
    > I understand that when MSWord files are opened on another
    > computer the default setting of the client machine take precedence.
    > This almost always leads to altered formatting and possible font
    > substitution.
    >
    > I accept it may be necessary to pre- load some fonts to avoid
    > font substitution.
    >
    > Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    > formatting of the original document ?
    >
    >

    The problem with this is that the facilities on the other computer may make this
    impossible:

    1) Font problems - particularly if there are two different versions of Windows
    involved.
    2) Differing release levels of WORD.
    3) Style names used that do not exist on the other machine or are defined
    differently.

    If the two machines are networked then it would be far better to make the
    printer available to the original computer where the documents were written.

    HTH
    Crash.
     
    Crash, Sep 25, 2005
    #3
  4. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz wrote:

    > Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    >formatting of the original document ?


    Try:
    1. embedding the fonts in the document before transferring it to the
    new machine and
    2. transferring the template (.DOT), along with the document file

    That will probably help preserve the look of the document on the new
    machine.

    But even if you were to install the laser printer on the old machine,
    you'd find that the document would look different, due only to
    selecting a different printer to print the document.

    cheers
    Steve
     
    Steve Marshall, Sep 25, 2005
    #4
  5. Peter:

    Tks for prompt reply.

    Can you confirm that the pdf writer you suggested will handle
    100-150 pp documents with many images and not alter original
    formatting ?

    Does cutepdf provide for alternative colour options, that is for
    files to be saved with either CMYK or RGB options ?
     
    lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz, Sep 25, 2005
    #5
  6. Steve:

    Tks for suggestions.

    Try:
    >1. embedding the fonts in the document before transferring it to the
    >new machine and


    before I posted the original query I tried searching Word help
    for information on embedding fonts, but not information was
    forthcoming.
     
    lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz, Sep 25, 2005
    #6
  7. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz wrote:

    >before I posted the original query I tried searching Word help
    >for information on embedding fonts, but not information was
    >forthcoming.


    In Word97 -- Tools, Options, Save, Embed TT Fonts.
     
    Steve Marshall, Sep 25, 2005
    #7
  8. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz

    N.Oway Guest

    lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz wrote:
    > I want to transfer MSWord files to another computer to access a
    > laser printer. Acrobat is not available.
    >


    Open Word document with OpenOffice and Export to PDF
     
    N.Oway, Sep 25, 2005
    #8
  9. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz

    Gordon Guest

    On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 10:49:09 +1200, lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz wrote:

    > I want to transfer MSWord files to another computer to access a
    > laser printer. Acrobat is not available.
    >
    > I understand that when MSWord files are opened on another
    > computer the default setting of the client machine take precedence.
    > This almost always leads to altered formatting and possible font
    > substitution.
    >
    > I accept it may be necessary to pre- load some fonts to avoid
    > font substitution.
    >
    > Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    > formatting of the original document ?


    A fine example of why we need open file formats.
     
    Gordon, Sep 25, 2005
    #9
  10. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz wrote:
    > Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    > formatting of the original document ?


    you can embed the fonts at the point of saving... it makes the files
    much larger, but it works.

    --
    http://dave.net.nz <- My personal site.
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Sep 25, 2005
    #10
  11. Gordon wrote:
    >> I want to transfer MSWord files to another computer to access a
    >>laser printer. Acrobat is not available.


    >> I understand that when MSWord files are opened on another
    >>computer the default setting of the client machine take precedence.
    >>This almost always leads to altered formatting and possible font
    >>substitution.


    >> I accept it may be necessary to pre- load some fonts to avoid
    >>font substitution.


    >> Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    >>formatting of the original document ?


    > A fine example of why we need open file formats.


    A "fine example" is because the OP didn't know how to embed fonts?

    --
    http://dave.net.nz <- My personal site.
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Sep 25, 2005
    #11
  12. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz

    AD. Guest

    On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 16:38:48 +1200, Gordon wrote:

    >> Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    >> formatting of the original document ?

    >
    > A fine example of why we need open file formats.


    Huh? There are lots of fine examples of why we need open file formats, but
    that doesn't seem to be one of them.

    What bearing does controlling how a different client computer renders
    something and/or embedding fonts have to do with whether or not the format
    is open or not?

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Sep 25, 2005
    #12
  13. In article <>, "Dave - Dave.net.nz" <> wrote:
    >Gordon wrote:
    >>> I want to transfer MSWord files to another computer to access a
    >>>laser printer. Acrobat is not available.
    >>> I understand that when MSWord files are opened on another
    >>>computer the default setting of the client machine take precedence.
    >>>This almost always leads to altered formatting and possible font
    >>>substitution.
    >>> I accept it may be necessary to pre- load some fonts to avoid
    >>>font substitution.
    >>> Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    >>>formatting of the original document ?

    >> A fine example of why we need open file formats.

    >
    >A "fine example" is because the OP didn't know how to embed fonts?


    ... but that still leaves the question, why should he have to do so ? :)


    Bruce

    ----------------------------------------
    I believe you find life such a problem because you think there are the good
    people and the bad people. You're wrong, of course. There are, always and
    only, the bad people, but some of them are on opposite sides.

    Lord Vetinari in Guards ! Guards ! - Terry Pratchett

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Sep 26, 2005
    #13
  14. Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    >>>A fine example of why we need open file formats.


    >>A "fine example" is because the OP didn't know how to embed fonts?


    > ... but that still leaves the question, why should he have to do so ? :)


    Because font's get upgraded, machines may not have the same sets of
    fonts availible, pretty simple to figure that one out Bruce.

    If you want it to look the same, you have to have the same
    fonts(including versions) availible.

    --
    http://dave.net.nz <- My personal site.
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Sep 26, 2005
    #14
  15. In article <>, "Dave - Dave.net.nz" <> wrote:
    >Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    >>>>A fine example of why we need open file formats.

    >
    >>>A "fine example" is because the OP didn't know how to embed fonts?

    >
    >> ... but that still leaves the question, why should he have to do so ? :)

    >
    >Because font's get upgraded, machines may not have the same sets of
    >fonts availible, pretty simple to figure that one out Bruce.
    >
    >If you want it to look the same, you have to have the same
    >fonts(including versions) availible.


    Accepted ... but as we all know, changing the printer will change the look
    of a document, whether fonts are there or not. Seems to me that if a font
    isn't available for what ever reason, the sane thing to do would be to say
    so and what it should be replaced with. ?.

    Might stop those idiots that think 25 fonts in one document looks "kewl" too
    :)



    Bruce

    ----------------------------------------
    I believe you find life such a problem because you think there are the good
    people and the bad people. You're wrong, of course. There are, always and
    only, the bad people, but some of them are on opposite sides.

    Lord Vetinari in Guards ! Guards ! - Terry Pratchett

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Sep 26, 2005
    #15
  16. Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    >>>>>A fine example of why we need open file formats.


    >>>>A "fine example" is because the OP didn't know how to embed fonts?


    >>>... but that still leaves the question, why should he have to do so ? :)


    >>Because font's get upgraded, machines may not have the same sets of
    >>fonts availible, pretty simple to figure that one out Bruce.
    >>If you want it to look the same, you have to have the same
    >>fonts(including versions) availible.


    > Accepted ... but as we all know, changing the printer will change the look
    > of a document, whether fonts are there or not. Seems to me that if a font
    > isn't available for what ever reason, the sane thing to do would be to say
    > so and what it should be replaced with. ?.


    I'm guessing there is some sort of font standard, as if I make a doc
    with odd fonts, it seems to grab the same fonts on two different
    machines when the "correct" fonts arent there... maybe a preference system?

    > Might stop those idiots that think 25 fonts in one document looks "kewl" too
    > :)


    Those idiots will always be around.

    --
    http://dave.net.nz <- My personal site.
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Sep 26, 2005
    #16
  17. In article <1127682507.0809f327ea7eb7bce16fc70f520e8a39@teranews>,
    "AD." <> wrote:

    >On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 16:38:48 +1200, Gordon wrote:
    >
    >>> Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    >>> formatting of the original document ?

    >>
    >> A fine example of why we need open file formats.

    >
    >Huh? There are lots of fine examples of why we need open file formats, but
    >that doesn't seem to be one of them.
    >
    >What bearing does controlling how a different client computer renders
    >something and/or embedding fonts have to do with whether or not the format
    >is open or not?


    Because open formats offer more opportunity for a range of third-party
    tools to be developed to do analysis or tweaking of the files for
    various purposes (such as getting to the root of the abovementioned
    problem), without having to be locked into one vendor.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 26, 2005
    #17
  18. In article <O1MZe.14376$>,
    z (Bruce Sinclair)
    wrote:

    >In article <>, "Dave - Dave.net.nz"
    ><> wrote:
    >>Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    >>>>>A fine example of why we need open file formats.

    >>
    >>>>A "fine example" is because the OP didn't know how to embed fonts?

    >>
    >>> ... but that still leaves the question, why should he have to do so ? :)

    >>
    >>Because font's get upgraded, machines may not have the same sets of
    >>fonts availible, pretty simple to figure that one out Bruce.
    >>
    >>If you want it to look the same, you have to have the same
    >>fonts(including versions) availible.

    >
    >Accepted ... but as we all know, changing the printer will change the look
    >of a document, whether fonts are there or not.


    I never had that problem on a Mac. Also I don't think it's possible on
    Linux either.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 26, 2005
    #18
  19. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz

    AD. Guest

    On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 20:02:05 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    >>Huh? There are lots of fine examples of why we need open file formats,
    >>but that doesn't seem to be one of them.
    >>
    >>What bearing does controlling how a different client computer renders
    >>something and/or embedding fonts have to do with whether or not the
    >>format is open or not?

    >
    > Because open formats offer more opportunity for a range of third-party
    > tools to be developed to do analysis or tweaking of the files for various
    > purposes (such as getting to the root of the abovementioned problem),
    > without having to be locked into one vendor.


    How would this openness solve that 'problem'? How do these tools magically
    understand what the document looked like on the source computer? Or what
    the original author intended?

    If anything, more openness creates more opportunity for rendering to
    change between machines and between different platforms than it would in a
    more controlled closed environment.

    But:

    I put problem in quotes because I reckon it isn't really a problem
    and office suites are the wrong approach to creating content in the first
    place - and the sooner people get over this issue of different renderings
    and concentrate on content rather than the presentation of their
    precious memos the better.

    I think the software world would be better off if they channelled all that
    word processing development effort into easy to use mainstream tools for
    authoring things like Docbook, DITA and TeX etc. As well as integrating
    these tools with CMS and Wikis etc, and easy to use tools for creating
    stylesheets for those formats too.

    OpenDocument is a small step towards that approach though.

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Sep 26, 2005
    #19
  20. lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz

    GJ Guest

    Sorry to tell you even embedding the fonts might not work. The best
    suggestion is a PDF Printer. I use PDFCreator
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/pdfcreator/ which is totally free and
    PDF995 http://www.pdf995.com/ which is shareware.

    I have used PDFCreator to print 2500+ pages in one document.

    GJ


    lrolloatparadisedotnetdotnz wrote:
    > I want to transfer MSWord files to another computer to access a
    > laser printer. Acrobat is not available.
    >
    > I understand that when MSWord files are opened on another
    > computer the default setting of the client machine take precedence.
    > This almost always leads to altered formatting and possible font
    > substitution.
    >
    > I accept it may be necessary to pre- load some fonts to avoid
    > font substitution.
    >
    > Is there a way of forcing a client computer to comply with the
    > formatting of the original document ?
    >
    >
     
    GJ, Sep 27, 2005
    #20
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