Installing Word, limited number of times

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Richard Fangnail, Oct 16, 2010.

  1. I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    installed it?
     
    Richard Fangnail, Oct 16, 2010
    #1
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  2. Richard Fangnail

    Queenie Guest

    The little guy who lives inside your motherboard counts and jots it down. LOL!
    "Richard Fangnail" <> wrote in message news:...
    I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    installed it?
     
    Queenie, Oct 16, 2010
    #2
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  3. Richard Fangnail

    Mike Easter Guest

    Richard Fangnail wrote:
    > I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    > three times.


    Show me/us where you read that - with a link. Maybe you didn't read it
    correctly. Maybe you dreamed it.

    There is a process by which MS assures your license and prevents what
    they call 'softlifting'.

    http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/mpa.aspx Microsoft Product Activation

    Perhaps you are confusing something about licensing and product
    activation with how many different computers you can install a MS product.

    If you have a license for one machine, it is for one machine. If you
    have a license for several machines, it is for several machines.

    <q>
    Can I install Office Home and Student 2010 on more than one device?

    It depends on what you purchase—a Traditional Disc or Product Key Card.
    If you purchase a Traditional Disc retail license of Office Home and
    Student 2010, the retail license terms allows you to install, activate,
    and use Office Home and Student 2010 on up to three PCs in a single
    household.

    If you purchase the Office Home and Student 2010 Product Key Card, you
    can only activate and use Home and Student on one PC or device. For more
    information on what type of license you have purchased and to obtain an
    overview of your licensing agreement, visit the Microsoft Software
    License Terms (MSLT) for Office 2010
    </q>


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Oct 16, 2010
    #3
  4. Richard Fangnail

    Mike Easter Guest

    Bobby Bewl wrote:

    > After installing the copy needs to be activated. Microsoft records the
    > IP address of each activation, and a reasonable number of activations
    > allowed from up to 3 different IP addresses (not unlimited, but more
    > than 3). Microsoft records the MAC address (Medium Access Control - each
    > network card has a unique 'DNA' code that can be used to uniquely
    > identify individual computers operating under the same IP address - but
    > it can be faked).
    >

    I don't know exactly how MS creates the hardware hash for product
    activation of Word or Office 2010, but I doubt if it is simply based on
    IP or MAC.

    In the past, a number of different hardware elements of the computer
    were taken into account.

    Just using the MAC and/or IP wouldn't get the job done very well at all
    for several reasons, not the least of which is that both are easily changed.

    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Oct 16, 2010
    #4
  5. Richard Fangnail

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 13:02:06 -0700, Mike Easter wrote:

    > Bobby Bewl wrote:
    >
    >> After installing the copy needs to be activated. Microsoft records the
    >> IP address of each activation, and a reasonable number of activations
    >> allowed from up to 3 different IP addresses (not unlimited, but more
    >> than 3). Microsoft records the MAC address (Medium Access Control -
    >> each network card has a unique 'DNA' code that can be used to uniquely
    >> identify individual computers operating under the same IP address - but
    >> it can be faked).
    >>

    > I don't know exactly how MS creates the hardware hash for product
    > activation of Word or Office 2010, but I doubt if it is simply based on
    > IP or MAC.
    >
    > In the past, a number of different hardware elements of the computer
    > were taken into account.
    >
    > Just using the MAC and/or IP wouldn't get the job done very well at all
    > for several reasons, not the least of which is that both are easily
    > changed.


    Might use things like machine ID generated hash, CPU ID, stuff like that.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Oct 16, 2010
    #5
  6. Richard Fangnail

    Mike Easter Guest

    Meat Plow wrote:
    > Mike Easter wrote:


    >> I don't know exactly how MS creates the hardware hash for product
    >> activation of Word or Office 2010, but I doubt if it is simply based on
    >> IP or MAC.
    >>
    >> In the past, a number of different hardware elements of the computer
    >> were taken into account.
    >>
    >> Just using the MAC and/or IP wouldn't get the job done very well at all
    >> for several reasons, not the least of which is that both are easily
    >> changed.

    >
    > Might use things like machine ID generated hash, CPU ID, stuff like that.


    I read somewhere that, at least previously, MS used 7 machine 'point'
    characteristics and the NIC was worth 3 points of the 7, while other
    hardware components were worth 1 point each. Then if you made hardware
    changes and/but still had 4 of the hardware 'points' you didn't need to
    reactivate.

    So, that makes the NIC the most important, but not essential.

    But that old information isn't necessarily the way MS does it currently.


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Oct 16, 2010
    #6
  7. Richard Fangnail

    richard Guest

    On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 11:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Richard Fangnail wrote:

    > I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    > three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    > installed it?


    Most likely with a registry key. Or perhaps even a hidden file tucked in
    somewhere that keeps track. cuz there ain't way it can be written to a
    cdrom disk.
     
    richard, Oct 16, 2010
    #7
  8. Richard Fangnail

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 14:00:11 -0700, Mike Easter wrote:

    > Meat Plow wrote:
    >> Mike Easter wrote:

    >
    >>> I don't know exactly how MS creates the hardware hash for product
    >>> activation of Word or Office 2010, but I doubt if it is simply based
    >>> on IP or MAC.
    >>>
    >>> In the past, a number of different hardware elements of the computer
    >>> were taken into account.
    >>>
    >>> Just using the MAC and/or IP wouldn't get the job done very well at
    >>> all for several reasons, not the least of which is that both are
    >>> easily changed.

    >>
    >> Might use things like machine ID generated hash, CPU ID, stuff like
    >> that.

    >
    > I read somewhere that, at least previously, MS used 7 machine 'point'
    > characteristics and the NIC was worth 3 points of the 7, while other
    > hardware components were worth 1 point each. Then if you made hardware
    > changes and/but still had 4 of the hardware 'points' you didn't need to
    > reactivate.
    >
    > So, that makes the NIC the most important, but not essential.
    >
    > But that old information isn't necessarily the way MS does it currently.


    Only problem with an ID relying that heavily on a MAC is not all machines
    need have a network interface. Yeah I know probably 99.9% of the hardware
    available have them one way or another but that .1% would need another
    qualifier. Each machine would need a CPU and each CPU has its own ID as
    unique as a MAC address. Or at least i think it does :)



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Oct 16, 2010
    #8
  9. Richard Fangnail

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 14:57:57 -0400, Queenie wrote:

    > The little guy who lives inside your motherboard counts and jots it
    > down. LOL!
    > "Richard Fangnail" <> wrote in message
    > news:43e833ea-d657-4a74-9c13-

    ...
    > I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    > three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    > installed it?<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0
    > Transitional//EN">
    > <HTML><HEAD>
    > <META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
    > <META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18975"> <STYLE></STYLE>
    > </HEAD>
    > <BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
    > <DIV><FONT color=#000080 size=4 face="Comic Sans MS">The little guy who
    > lives inside&nbsp;your motherboard counts and jots it down.
    > LOL!</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE
    > style="BORDER-LEFT: #000080 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT:
    > 0px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
    > <DIV>"Richard Fangnail" &lt;<A
    > href="mailto:"></

    A>&gt;
    > wrote in message <A
    > href="news:43e833ea-d657-4a74-9c13-

    ">news:43e833ea-d657-4a74-9c13-
    </A>...</DIV>I've
    > read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it<BR>three
    > times.&nbsp; But how does it keep track of how many times
    > you've<BR>installed it?</BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>


    WTF???????



    --
    The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by
    the Government of Oceania itself, ’just to keep people frightened’.
    This was an idea that had literally never occurred to him.
    --- George Orwell, 1984
     
    Aardvark, Oct 16, 2010
    #9
  10. Richard Fangnail

    Mike Easter Guest

    Aardvark wrote:
    > Queenie top posted:

    X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.5931
    Content-Type: text/html;

    > WTF???????


    Queenie is obeying the default configuration of hir MS OE master; which
    locates the cursor at the top where s/he starts typing configured for
    html instead of plaintext.

    Some people go thru' their life in a default condition :)


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Oct 17, 2010
    #10
  11. Richard Fangnail

    Parko Guest

    On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 21:19:06 +0000, Meat Plow wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 14:00:11 -0700, Mike Easter wrote:
    >
    >> Meat Plow wrote:
    >>> Mike Easter wrote:

    >>
    >>>> I don't know exactly how MS creates the hardware hash for product
    >>>> activation of Word or Office 2010, but I doubt if it is simply based
    >>>> on IP or MAC.
    >>>>
    >>>> In the past, a number of different hardware elements of the computer
    >>>> were taken into account.
    >>>>
    >>>> Just using the MAC and/or IP wouldn't get the job done very well at
    >>>> all for several reasons, not the least of which is that both are
    >>>> easily changed.
    >>>
    >>> Might use things like machine ID generated hash, CPU ID, stuff like
    >>> that.

    >>
    >> I read somewhere that, at least previously, MS used 7 machine 'point'
    >> characteristics and the NIC was worth 3 points of the 7, while other
    >> hardware components were worth 1 point each. Then if you made hardware
    >> changes and/but still had 4 of the hardware 'points' you didn't need to
    >> reactivate.
    >>
    >> So, that makes the NIC the most important, but not essential.
    >>
    >> But that old information isn't necessarily the way MS does it
    >> currently.

    >
    > Only problem with an ID relying that heavily on a MAC is not all
    > machines need have a network interface. Yeah I know probably 99.9% of
    > the hardware available have them one way or another but that .1% would
    > need another qualifier. Each machine would need a CPU and each CPU has
    > its own ID as unique as a MAC address. Or at least i think it does :)


    Since the Pentium III; created quite a fuss at the time.
    ftp://download.intel.com/technology/itj/Q21999/PDF/serial_number.pdf



    --
    Oh, bugger!
     
    Parko, Oct 17, 2010
    #11
  12. Richard Fangnail

    richard Guest

    On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 16:35:44 -0700, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 17:07:37 -0400, richard <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 11:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Richard Fangnail wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    >>> three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    >>> installed it?

    >>
    >>Most likely with a registry key. Or perhaps even a hidden file tucked in
    >>somewhere that keeps track. cuz there ain't way it can be written to a
    >>cdrom disk.

    >
    > "DVDROM" is not a "CDROM"
    >
    > And bullis, it communicates with Microsoft's servers, that's how it
    > knows, not a "registry key".


    Showing off your frickin stupidity again.
    ROM stands for "READ ONLY MEMORY".
    It can not be written to.
    DVDRAM, can be written to.

    Explain how a connection to the M$ servers is gonna happen when the user
    has no itnernet service.
     
    richard, Oct 17, 2010
    #12
  13. Richard Fangnail

    richard Guest

    On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 20:35:28 -0700, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 21:13:41 -0600, richard <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Showing off your frickin stupidity again.

    >
    > Where?
    >
    >>ROM stands for "READ ONLY MEMORY".

    >
    > No shit Sherlock.
    >
    >>It can not be written to.
    >>DVDRAM, can be written to.

    >
    > No shit.
    >
    > Please point out where I said it writes to the DVD-ROM.
    >
    >>Explain how a connection to the M$ servers is gonna happen when the user
    >>has no itnernet service.

    >
    > It won't.
    >
    > Nor will your Microsoft program work in anything other than a limited
    > function mode.
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927921
    >
    > "To fully use a retail version of a 2007 Office suite or program or an
    > Office 2010 suite or program, you must activate it. If you do not
    > activate the product after you install it, the 2007 Office programs
    > and the Office 2010 programs can be started only in
    > reduced-functionality mode."
    >
    > So, to sum it up, you were wrong. The licensing isn't tracked by a
    > registry key, it's tracked over the Internet when you enter in your
    > license key.
    >
    > Oh, poof, richard proved wrong, and vanishes, as usual.


    Gee just like thousands of other software programs.
    Well that still doesn't explain how Office connects to the M$ servers.
    Hey, I just tell my firewall not to allow it.
     
    richard, Oct 17, 2010
    #13
  14. Richard Fangnail

    richard Guest

    On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 21:08:39 -0700, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 21:55:48 -0600, richard <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Gee just like thousands of other software programs.

    >
    > No kidding.
    >
    >>Well that still doesn't explain how Office connects to the M$ servers.

    >
    > It only does if your firewall allows it.
    >
    >>Hey, I just tell my firewall not to allow it.

    >
    > Do you not know how to read??
    >
    > "If you do not activate the product after you install it, the 2007
    > Office programs and the Office 2010 programs can be started only in
    > reduced-functionality mode."
    >
    > Shit, you are one dumb mother fucker.
    >
    > Do you need someone to feed you?
    >
    > richard. ruprecht. richard. ruprecht.
    >
    > Holy shit, I think I've figured out your true identity.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqMc9B7uDV8


    Still, you are the dumbfuck troll as always. Goodbye.
     
    richard, Oct 17, 2010
    #14
  15. Richard Fangnail

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 16:35:44 -0700, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 17:07:37 -0400, richard <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 11:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Richard Fangnail wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    >>> three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    >>> installed it?

    >>
    >>Most likely with a registry key. Or perhaps even a hidden file tucked in
    >>somewhere that keeps track. cuz there ain't way it can be written to a
    >>cdrom disk.

    >
    > "DVDROM" is not a "CDROM"
    >
    > And bullis, it communicates with Microsoft's servers, that's how it
    > knows, not a "registry key".


    How many times does he have to be told that before it finally sinks in?



    --
    The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by
    the Government of Oceania itself, ’just to keep people frightened’.
    This was an idea that had literally never occurred to him.
    --- George Orwell, 1984
     
    Aardvark, Oct 17, 2010
    #15
  16. Richard Fangnail

    richard Guest

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2010 13:15:38 +0000 (UTC), Aardvark wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 16:35:44 -0700, Evan Platt wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 17:07:37 -0400, richard <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 11:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Richard Fangnail wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    >>>> three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    >>>> installed it?
    >>>
    >>>Most likely with a registry key. Or perhaps even a hidden file tucked in
    >>>somewhere that keeps track. cuz there ain't way it can be written to a
    >>>cdrom disk.

    >>
    >> "DVDROM" is not a "CDROM"
    >>
    >> And bullis, it communicates with Microsoft's servers, that's how it
    >> knows, not a "registry key".

    >
    > How many times does he have to be told that before it finally sinks in?


    How many time do you have to be told that a "ROM" disk can not be written
    to?
     
    richard, Oct 17, 2010
    #16
  17. richard wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >> Evan Platt wrote:
    >>> richard wrote:
    >>>> Richard Fangnail wrote:
    >>>>> I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    >>>>> three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    >>>>> installed it?
    >>>>
    >>>> Most likely with a registry key. Or perhaps even a hidden file
    >>>> tucked in somewhere that keeps track. cuz there ain't way it can
    >>>> be written to a cdrom disk.
    >>>
    >>> "DVDROM" is not a "CDROM"
    >>>
    >>> And bullis, it communicates with Microsoft's servers, that's how it
    >>> knows, not a "registry key".

    >>
    >> How many times does he have to be told that before it finally sinks
    >> in?

    >
    > How many time do you have to be told that a "ROM" disk can not be
    > written to?


    How many times do *you* need to be told that is irrelevant, and that
    when you install Word (or other Office products) it *needs* to contact
    the Microsoft servers in order to *activate* and turn it into something
    other than a crippled application? The _server_ counts the installations
    (by product key), and also checks to see if it is the same hardware
    (computer).

    It does NOT need to write to the CD or DVD. Or the registry.

    --
    -bts
    -In a broadband world, you are just a dialup
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Oct 17, 2010
    #17
  18. Richard Fangnail

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2010 07:45:02 -0600, richard wrote:

    > On Sun, 17 Oct 2010 13:15:38 +0000 (UTC), Aardvark wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 16:35:44 -0700, Evan Platt wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 17:07:37 -0400, richard <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 11:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Richard Fangnail wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    >>>>> three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    >>>>> installed it?
    >>>>
    >>>>Most likely with a registry key. Or perhaps even a hidden file tucked
    >>>>in somewhere that keeps track. cuz there ain't way it can be written
    >>>>to a cdrom disk.
    >>>
    >>> "DVDROM" is not a "CDROM"
    >>>
    >>> And bullis, it communicates with Microsoft's servers, that's how it
    >>> knows, not a "registry key".

    >>
    >> How many times does he have to be told that before it finally sinks in?

    >
    > How many time do you have to be told that a "ROM" disk can not be
    > written to?


    Once was enough, thanks.



    --
    The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by
    the Government of Oceania itself, ’just to keep people frightened’.
    This was an idea that had literally never occurred to him.
    --- George Orwell, 1984
     
    Aardvark, Oct 17, 2010
    #18
  19. Richard Fangnail

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2010 10:30:42 -0400, Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:

    > richtard mumbled:


    >> How many time do you have to be told that a "ROM" disk can not be
    >> written to?

    >
    > How many times do *you* need to be told that is irrelevant, and that
    > when you install Word (or other Office products) it *needs* to contact
    > the Microsoft servers in order to *activate* and turn it into something
    > other than a crippled application? The _server_ counts the installations
    > (by product key), and also checks to see if it is the same hardware
    > (computer).
    >
    > It does NOT need to write to the CD or DVD. Or the registry.


    He'll never be able to get his head around the concept. How many times do
    you think it's been explained to him?



    --
    The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by
    the Government of Oceania itself, ’just to keep people frightened’.
    This was an idea that had literally never occurred to him.
    --- George Orwell, 1984
     
    Aardvark, Oct 17, 2010
    #19
  20. Richard Fangnail

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2010 07:45:02 -0600, richard wrote:

    > On Sun, 17 Oct 2010 13:15:38 +0000 (UTC), Aardvark wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 16:35:44 -0700, Evan Platt wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 17:07:37 -0400, richard <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 11:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Richard Fangnail wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I've read that if you buy Word on a DVDROM you can only install it
    >>>>> three times. But how does it keep track of how many times you've
    >>>>> installed it?
    >>>>
    >>>>Most likely with a registry key. Or perhaps even a hidden file tucked
    >>>>in somewhere that keeps track. cuz there ain't way it can be written
    >>>>to a cdrom disk.
    >>>
    >>> "DVDROM" is not a "CDROM"
    >>>
    >>> And bullis, it communicates with Microsoft's servers, that's how it
    >>> knows, not a "registry key".

    >>
    >> How many times does he have to be told that before it finally sinks in?

    >
    > How many time do you have to be told that a "ROM" disk can not be
    > written to?


    How many times do you have to be told that: Tires don't implode. Singular
    form of Movies is not "movy" ?



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Oct 17, 2010
    #20
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