installing Ubuntu parallel to Vista?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by bj, Sep 8, 2008.

  1. bj

    bj Guest

    Good morning,

    Is there any site which would lead you through installing Ubuntu on a comp
    that already has Vista, as an alternative OS?
    Thx!
    bj
     
    bj, Sep 8, 2008
    #1
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  2. bj

    Paul Guest

    bj wrote:
    > Good morning,
    >
    > Is there any site which would lead you through installing Ubuntu on a comp
    > that already has Vista, as an alternative OS?
    > Thx!
    > bj
    >
    >


    https://help.ubuntu.com/8.04/switching/dualboot.html

    It might be simpler to use a separate, new disk, and add
    that to the computer. Nothing big, perhaps an 80GB
    SATA drive. That would avoid the partitioning issues at
    least.

    What I do here, with foreign OSes, is install them entirely
    on new disks. Each disk has only one OS. No boot loaders are
    used to select an OS to boot. I use the BIOS controlled
    boot order, to select a disk (and associated OS). I can
    have FreeBSD on one disk, Windows on another, and use the BIOS
    to select which one to boot. The foreign OS may have its
    own boot loader, but it would only have one item listed.
    When I use this method, only the new clean disk, and the
    foreign OS installer CD are present in the machine at
    install time - don't leave any disks connected that you're
    worried an installer could mess up. In the case of your
    Vista disk, I would unplug it, and only have the new disk
    connected during the Linux install.

    If you want to live dangerously, you can try stuffing
    multiple OSes on the same disk (as per the instructions
    on the above Ubuntu page), but for me, that is too complicated.
    For one thing, if you have an HP/Acer/Gateway/Dell computer,
    there could be an unlabeled recovery partition, and if you
    delete that by accident, then you've lost one recovery
    feature for your Windows install. And if the computer
    requires you to burn recovery CDs, rather than the computer
    manufacturer providing a set of CD/DVD install disks for
    Windows, then you could well lose any recovery copy of
    Windows. Before doing anything complicated, at least prepare
    your backup copies of Vista plus applications, as instructed
    by the manual that came with your computer. Many people forget
    this step, and regret it later. Some companies charge $50
    to send a set of CD/DVD discs to you, but the offer only
    lasts during the warranty period (perhaps three years). After
    that, tech support will only laugh at your dilemma.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Sep 8, 2008
    #2
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  3. bj

    Paul Guest

    bj wrote:
    > Good morning,
    >
    > Is there any site which would lead you through installing Ubuntu on a comp
    > that already has Vista, as an alternative OS?
    > Thx!
    > bj
    >
    >


    https://help.ubuntu.com/8.04/switching/dualboot.html

    It might be simpler to use a separate, new disk, and add
    that to the computer. Nothing big, perhaps an 80GB
    SATA drive. That would avoid the partitioning issues at
    least.

    What I do here, with foreign OSes, is install them entirely
    on new disks. Each disk has only one OS. No boot loaders are
    used to select an OS to boot. I use the BIOS controlled
    boot order, to select a disk (and associated OS). I can
    have FreeBSD on one disk, Windows on another, and use the BIOS
    to select which one to boot. The foreign OS may have its
    own boot loader, but it would only have one item listed.
    When I use this method, only the new clean disk, and the
    foreign OS installer CD are present in the machine at
    install time - don't leave any disks connected that you're
    worried an installer could mess up. In the case of your
    Vista disk, I would unplug it, and only have the new disk
    connected during the Linux install.

    If you want to live dangerously, you can try stuffing
    multiple OSes on the same disk (as per the instructions
    on the above Ubuntu page), but for me, that is too complicated.
    For one thing, if you have an HP/Acer/Gateway/Dell computer,
    there could be an unlabeled recovery partition, and if you
    delete that by accident, then you've lost one recovery
    feature for your Windows install. And if the computer
    requires you to burn recovery CDs, rather than the computer
    manufacturer providing a set of CD/DVD install disks for
    Windows, then you could well lose any recovery copy of
    Windows. Before doing anything complicated, at least prepare
    your backup copies of Vista plus applications, as instructed
    by the manual that came with your computer. Many people forget
    this step, and regret it later. Some companies charge $50
    to send a set of CD/DVD discs to you, but the offer only
    lasts during the warranty period (perhaps three years). After
    that, tech support will only laugh at your dilemma.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Sep 8, 2008
    #3
  4. bj

    saycheez Guest

    You have several options.
    Use a boot manager and install Ubuntu to its own bootable partition. This
    can be on the same hard drive as Vista or, better, a second hard drive. If
    you do not understand about partitioning and boot managers there are several
    commercial packages that will make it safer but not idiot proof. This is the
    best option. There are freeware programs that will work as well but are not
    as polished and are more dangerous for the non-expert to use.
    Ubuntu has an option that does not work consistently in my experience to
    burn an ISO to your hard drive and install a boot manager that will run
    this. I think this feature works, if it works for you at all, under XP only.
    Booting from the live Ubuntu CD can test whether the OS installer has
    drivers for and recognizes what is in your system. Alas it often does not
    for some common configurations. This immediately puts you in Linux hell
    trying to learn how to download and install basic device drivers, configure
    network settings etc.
    If you have basic needs only and older hardware, and are willing to learn
    Linux commands (alas many basic operations require command line input)
    Ubuntu can be very useful.
    However you are likely to run into hardware/driver issues (printers and
    scanners are common problems) and depending on what you do on your machine
    find that much of the Linux freeware is just not as fully featured as
    commercial shrinkwrap programs.
     
    saycheez, Sep 10, 2008
    #4
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