Inkjet printing both sides

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Terry Pinnell, Mar 16, 2008.

  1. Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    here.

    I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    deliberately 'waxed' or something?

    --
    Terry, East Grinstead, UK
     
    Terry Pinnell, Mar 16, 2008
    #1
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  2. Terry Pinnell

    Guest Guest

    Most (probably all) card programs print on one side and then you fold it
    appropriately.
    Old Bob
     
    Guest, Mar 16, 2008
    #2
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  3. "Terry Pinnell" <> wrote:
    > Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    > appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    > here.
    >
    > I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    > quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    > from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    > wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    > Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    > ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    > I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    > deliberately 'waxed' or something?


    It's probably deliberate. They want to sell you "double sided photo paper"
    at outrageous prices. The Japanese fine print on my favorite Epson matte
    photo paper says (loose translation) "Don't even think about trying to print
    on the back side".

    David J. Littleboy
    Who named his printer "Ink-sucking pig"
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Mar 16, 2008
    #3
  4. Terry Pinnell

    rjn Guest

    Terry Pinnell <> wrote:

    > But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    > wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried.


    I trick I've used to work around this: If you have access
    to a laser printer, print the back side on that first,
    then the color on the photo side.

    --
    Regards, Bob Niland mailto:
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
     
    rjn, Mar 16, 2008
    #4
  5. Some inkjet coatings, and the glossy are more likely, can be a type of
    plastic that will melt with the heat of a laser printer fuser. Some
    people have ruined their laser printer's fuser doing this, so beware!

    Obviously, some inkjet paper coatings survive the heat, but you need to
    be careful.

    Art

    rjn wrote:

    > Terry Pinnell <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    >>wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried.

    >
    >
    > I trick I've used to work around this: If you have access
    > to a laser printer, print the back side on that first,
    > then the color on the photo side.
    >
    > --
    > Regards, Bob Niland mailto:
    > http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    > NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
     
    Arthur Entlich, Mar 16, 2008
    #5
  6. Terry Pinnell

    Paul Furman Guest

    Terry Pinnell wrote:
    > Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    > appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    > here.
    >
    > I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    > quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    > from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    > wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    > Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    > ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    > I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    > deliberately 'waxed' or something?


    Use matte 'watercolor' paper instead. It's really nice stuff and there's
    no coating to worry about.
     
    Paul Furman, Mar 16, 2008
    #6
  7. Terry Pinnell

    OpaPiloot Guest

    "David J. Littleboy" wrote:
    >
    > "Terry Pinnell" <> wrote:
    > > Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    > > appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    > > here.
    > >
    > > I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    > > quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    > > from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    > > wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    > > Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    > > ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    > > I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    > > deliberately 'waxed' or something?

    >
    > It's probably deliberate. They want to sell you "double sided photo paper"
    > at outrageous prices. The Japanese fine print on my favorite Epson matte
    > photo paper says (loose translation) "Don't even think about trying to print
    > on the back side".
    >
    > David J. Littleboy
    > Who named his printer "Ink-sucking pig"
    > Tokyo, Japan


    Nonsense, paper is coated on one side to keep costs down.
    There is double sided photopaper, e.g. Kodak Picture Pater CAT 807 7448,
    which is reasonable priced.
    You can also glue 2 sheets together.

    --
    Have fun, Bert
     
    OpaPiloot, Mar 16, 2008
    #7
  8. >> I trick I've used to work around this: If you have access
    >> to a laser printer, print the back side on that first,
    >> then the color on the photo side.


    > Some inkjet coatings, and the glossy are more likely, can be a type of
    > plastic that will melt with the heat of a laser printer fuser. Some
    > people have ruined their laser printer's fuser doing this, so beware!
    >
    > Obviously, some inkjet paper coatings survive the heat, but you need to
    > be careful.


    Right, I've had problems with a laser printer after feeding a page that was
    previously ink-jet-printed on the other side.

    But what about the opposite? Is there any problem first printing one side
    with a laser printer (or copier for that matter), then ink-jet-printing the
    second side?
     
    MyVeryOwnSelf, Mar 16, 2008
    #8
  9. Terry Pinnell

    Marvin Guest

    Terry Pinnell wrote:
    > Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    > appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    > here.
    >
    > I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    > quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    > from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    > wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    > Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    > ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    > I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    > deliberately 'waxed' or something?
    >

    I find that "presentation paper" works well for greeting
    cards. I use the HP brand on my HP printer.
     
    Marvin, Mar 16, 2008
    #9
  10. Terry Pinnell

    Burt Guest

    "Terry Pinnell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    > appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    > here.
    >
    > I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    > quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    > from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    > wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    > Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    > ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    > I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    > deliberately 'waxed' or something?
    >
    > --
    > Terry, East Grinstead, UK


    I would guess that the back coating has a function - possibly to keep the
    paper flat. Coating one side only may cause a different amount of moisture
    absorption and warp the paper. I've used Epson Glossy Photo paper and
    printed on both sides successfully. It does have a very faint logo repeat
    pattern printed on the back side, but no one who has received these cards
    noticed it at all. I currently use Staples Supreme Double Sided Matte paper
    for printing two sided cards. Because it is a paper specifically coated for
    receiving inkjet photo images, it looks quite good and is also a very decent
    weight and stiffness for cards. Although glossy photo papers print a more
    vivid photo, this matte paper is a close second best.
     
    Burt, Mar 16, 2008
    #10
  11. OpaPiloot <me@forget._it> wrote:

    >"David J. Littleboy" wrote:
    >>
    >> "Terry Pinnell" <> wrote:
    >> > Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    >> > appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    >> > here.
    >> >
    >> > I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    >> > quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    >> > from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    >> > wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    >> > Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    >> > ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    >> > I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    >> > deliberately 'waxed' or something?

    >>
    >> It's probably deliberate. They want to sell you "double sided photo paper"
    >> at outrageous prices. The Japanese fine print on my favorite Epson matte
    >> photo paper says (loose translation) "Don't even think about trying to print
    >> on the back side".
    >>
    >> David J. Littleboy
    >> Who named his printer "Ink-sucking pig"
    >> Tokyo, Japan

    >
    >Nonsense, paper is coated on one side to keep costs down.
    >There is double sided photopaper, e.g. Kodak Picture Pater CAT 807 7448,
    >which is reasonable priced.
    >You can also glue 2 sheets together.


    Thanks both.

    I suspect 2 glued sheets would be too hard to fold neatly.

    --
    Terry, East Grinstead, UK
     
    Terry Pinnell, Mar 16, 2008
    #11
  12. "Burt" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Terry Pinnell" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    >> appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    >> here.
    >>
    >> I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    >> quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    >> from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    >> wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    >> Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    >> ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    >> I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    >> deliberately 'waxed' or something?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Terry, East Grinstead, UK

    >
    >I would guess that the back coating has a function - possibly to keep the
    >paper flat. Coating one side only may cause a different amount of moisture
    >absorption and warp the paper. I've used Epson Glossy Photo paper and
    >printed on both sides successfully. It does have a very faint logo repeat
    >pattern printed on the back side, but no one who has received these cards
    >noticed it at all. I currently use Staples Supreme Double Sided Matte paper
    >for printing two sided cards. Because it is a paper specifically coated for
    >receiving inkjet photo images, it looks quite good and is also a very decent
    >weight and stiffness for cards. Although glossy photo papers print a more
    >vivid photo, this matte paper is a close second best.
    >


    Thanks for all the replies. I have a fair stock of this glossy paper,
    but looks like I'm not going to get anything printed on its back. (No
    laser.) I'll try some of the alternative paper types at a later date,
    but meanwhile I'm tackling the project on a couple of fronts.

    1) Folding the sheet twice, which gets all images onto one side,
    albeit smaller. Then using all four sections to the maximum.

    2) Have glued some plain inkjet paper to back of the glossy, and will
    try that with the 1-fold design.

    --
    Terry, East Grinstead, UK
     
    Terry Pinnell, Mar 16, 2008
    #12
  13. Re: Inkjet printing both sides (STUPIDITY WARNING!!)

    rjn wrote:

    >> But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    >> wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried.

    >
    > I trick I've used to work around this: If you have access
    > to a laser printer, print the back side on that first,
    > then the color on the photo side.


    Bob, please stop posting misinformation that can intentionally destroy
    someone's fuser by them unknowingly using glossy paper that has a plastic
    type coating! Yes, it does happen as I've had the misfortune of seeing it
    firsthand. Now go back to the eBay group and write a dissertation about who
    leaves feedback first since that's more your speed.




    Rita
     
    Rita Berkowitz, Mar 16, 2008
    #13
  14. Arthur Entlich wrote:

    > Some inkjet coatings, and the glossy are more likely, can be a type of
    > plastic that will melt with the heat of a laser printer fuser. Some
    > people have ruined their laser printer's fuser doing this, so beware!
    >
    > Obviously, some inkjet paper coatings survive the heat, but you need
    > to be careful.


    Art, thank you for correcting the situation. The aftermath is something you
    don't want to see first hand. Bob's a good guy, but he likes to spread
    misinformation without thinking of the consequences it would have if someone
    actually listened to him.




    Rita
     
    Rita Berkowitz, Mar 16, 2008
    #14
  15. Terry Pinnell

    rjn Guest

    Arthur Entlich <> wrote:

    > Some inkjet coatings, and the glossy are more likely, can be a type of
    > plastic that will melt with the heat of a laser printer fuser. Some
    > people have ruined their laser printer's fuser doing this, so beware!


    I would expect any papers not suited to laser printing
    to say so on the carton, although perhaps inadequately
    emphasized as "Use only in inkjet printers" or some such.

    > Obviously, some inkjet paper coatings survive the heat,
    > but you need to be careful.


    I've never had a problem doing it, but that could be just
    the luck of the draw on the media. I do have some early
    HP JetSeries stock that is clearly a plastic base, and
    that I stuff I never fed to the LaserJet for this very reason.

    Of course, if the OP doesn't own a laser printer, and
    buys an old LaserJet cheaply on eBay, then not much
    is at risk :)

    --
    Regards, Bob Niland mailto:
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
     
    rjn, Mar 16, 2008
    #15
  16. Terry Pinnell

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Re: Inkjet printing both sides (STUPIDITY WARNING!!)

    Rita Berkowitz <> wrote:
    >rjn wrote:
    >
    >>> But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    >>> wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried.

    >>
    >> I trick I've used to work around this: If you have access
    >> to a laser printer, print the back side on that first,
    >> then the color on the photo side.

    >
    >Bob, please stop posting misinformation that can intentionally destroy


    99% on the irony meter.

    --
    Ray Fischer
     
    Ray Fischer, Mar 16, 2008
    #16
  17. Terry Pinnell <> observed
    >Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    >appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    >here.
    >
    >I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    >quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    >from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    >wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    >Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    >ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    >I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    >deliberately 'waxed' or something?
    >


    My once favourite paper supplier (good deliver, reasonable prices)
    recently blotted its copybook with me, by moving to the Channel Isles,
    now the service is like other off shore companies.

    However I have enjoyed the Think double sided matt paper for some years.
    My last delivery was at increased price and the thickness (but not the
    weight) has decreased. However, I still think the following may suit
    you:-

    http://www.choicestationery.co.uk/Product.asp?Prd=17342

    Mike

    [The reply-to address is valid for 30 days from this posting]
    --
    Michael J Davis
    <><
    Some newsgroup contributors appear to have confused
    the meaning of "discussion" with "digression".
    <><
     
    Michael J Davis, Mar 16, 2008
    #17
  18. Terry Pinnell

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Terry Pinnell wrote:
    > Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    > appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    > here.
    >
    > I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    > quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    > from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    > wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    > Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    > ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    > I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    > deliberately 'waxed' or something?
    >

    You don't mention what printer you are using. Some modern inkjet
    printers are designed so that the ink and paper react chemically, and
    you NEED to use the recommended papers in order to get the best results.
    Using paper not designed to be printed on both sides can result in
    poor results, as you have noted. I can only suggest that you print the
    side that smears first, and give it some time (several minutes) to dry
    before printing the other side. This may give acceptable results.
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 17, 2008
    #18
  19. Terry Pinnell

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Paul Furman wrote:
    > Terry Pinnell wrote:
    >> Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    >> appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    >> here.
    >>
    >> I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    >> quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    >> from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    >> wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    >> Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    >> ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    >> I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    >> deliberately 'waxed' or something?

    >
    > Use matte 'watercolor' paper instead. It's really nice stuff and there's
    > no coating to worry about.


    My wife often prints cards on both sides, and we have found that Kodak
    'Semi gloss' paper works well for two sided printing on our HP printers.
    Other ink formulations may not work as well. Giving one side time to
    dry before printing the other side is essential when using coated papers!
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 17, 2008
    #19
  20. Ron Hunter <> wrote:

    >Terry Pinnell wrote:
    >> Somewhat OT for both groups (I'd appreciate a pointer to a more
    >> appropriate one), but I imagine there's some expertise on this subject
    >> here.
    >>
    >> I want to make a birthday card by folding a sheet of the A4 'Super
    >> quality photo paper for inkjet printers' that I have at hand, bought
    >> from WH Smith. But I find that on the non-glossy side I get a smeary
    >> wet mess with all the 'paper type' settings I've tried. Plain, Matte -
    >> Heavy, Photo, Premium Semi Gloss - even Inkjet Transparency! If the
    >> ink will stay on a transparent sheet of plastic with that last option,
    >> I'm darned if I can see why it won't do so on this stuff? Is it
    >> deliberately 'waxed' or something?
    >>

    >You don't mention what printer you are using. Some modern inkjet
    >printers are designed so that the ink and paper react chemically, and
    >you NEED to use the recommended papers in order to get the best results.
    > Using paper not designed to be printed on both sides can result in
    >poor results, as you have noted. I can only suggest that you print the
    >side that smears first, and give it some time (several minutes) to dry
    >before printing the other side. This may give acceptable results.


    Sorry, Ron, I meant to do so; it's an Epson C82.

    But when I said 'smeary wet mess', I was being precise! Ink was
    actually 'puddled' in several cases, with original image barely
    recognisable. That's as it emerged from printer, so no question of
    allowing it to dry.

    --
    Terry, East Grinstead, UK
     
    Terry Pinnell, Mar 17, 2008
    #20
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