Inkjet printers to print CDs

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Geoff M, Feb 9, 2006.

  1. Geoff M

    Geoff M Guest

    I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like the
    Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour print - I
    have a laser for everyday work.
    Any suggestions or recommendations?
    Geoff
    Geoff M, Feb 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. Geoff M

    Harry Guest

    On Thu, 09 Feb 2006 22:53:38 +1300, Geoff M wrote:

    > I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like the
    > Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour print - I
    > have a laser for everyday work.
    > Any suggestions or recommendations?


    You could try a Canon iP4200.
    Harry, Feb 9, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Geoff M

    Chris Hope Guest

    Geoff M wrote:

    > I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like
    > the Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour
    > print - I have a laser for everyday work.
    > Any suggestions or recommendations?


    I use a Canon Pixma IP3000 for printing CDs and it's been really good
    (I've printed about 4000 CDs and DVDs with it so far). I would assume
    the 4200 is a better model?

    --
    Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
    Chris Hope, Feb 9, 2006
    #3
  4. Geoff M

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Thu, 9 Feb 2006 22:53:38 +1300, Geoff M
    <> exclaimed:

    >I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like the
    >Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour print - I
    >have a laser for everyday work.
    >Any suggestions or recommendations?
    >Geoff


    Honestly, it's not worth going past the Canon. They're miles ahead of
    their competition in inkjet technologies.
    Fred Dagg, Feb 9, 2006
    #4
  5. Geoff M

    frederick Guest

    Fred Dagg wrote:
    > On Thu, 9 Feb 2006 22:53:38 +1300, Geoff M
    > <> exclaimed:
    >
    >
    >>I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like the
    >>Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour print - I
    >>have a laser for everyday work.
    >>Any suggestions or recommendations?
    >>Geoff

    >
    >
    > Honestly, it's not worth going past the Canon. They're miles ahead of
    > their competition in inkjet technologies.



    lol - tell HP and epson. Although canon do make some professional
    machines, HP and Epson dominate the pro market. I'm not saying that
    Canon are rubbish - but your comment is uninformed. As much as I
    dislike HP, for consumer inkjets, they are ahead in technology.

    If you really want to do only CDs and lots or them, then look here:
    http://www.primera.com/

    These are pro machines that have options to auto-load from a stack, and
    burn DVD/CD and print automatically. IIRC prices start at a few
    thousand dollars in NZ - not so expensive if you are doing a lot of
    CD/DVD printing/burning and your time is valuable.
    frederick, Feb 9, 2006
    #5
  6. Geoff M

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 10:34:45 +1300, frederick <>
    exclaimed:

    >Fred Dagg wrote:
    >> On Thu, 9 Feb 2006 22:53:38 +1300, Geoff M
    >> <> exclaimed:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like the
    >>>Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour print - I
    >>>have a laser for everyday work.
    >>>Any suggestions or recommendations?
    >>>Geoff

    >>
    >>
    >> Honestly, it's not worth going past the Canon. They're miles ahead of
    >> their competition in inkjet technologies.

    >
    >
    >lol - tell HP and epson. Although canon do make some professional
    >machines, HP and Epson dominate the pro market. I'm not saying that
    >Canon are rubbish - but your comment is uninformed. As much as I
    >dislike HP, for consumer inkjets, they are ahead in technology.
    >
    >If you really want to do only CDs and lots or them, then look here:
    >http://www.primera.com/
    >
    >These are pro machines that have options to auto-load from a stack, and
    >burn DVD/CD and print automatically. IIRC prices start at a few
    >thousand dollars in NZ - not so expensive if you are doing a lot of
    >CD/DVD printing/burning and your time is valuable.


    We were talking consumer-level, not pro.

    And a comparable Canon would laugh at an HP, in the consumer-level
    inkjet market.
    Fred Dagg, Feb 9, 2006
    #6
  7. Geoff M

    thing2 Guest

    Chris Hope wrote:
    > Geoff M wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like
    >>the Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour
    >>print - I have a laser for everyday work.
    >>Any suggestions or recommendations?

    >
    >
    > I use a Canon Pixma IP3000 for printing CDs and it's been really good
    > (I've printed about 4000 CDs and DVDs with it so far). I would assume
    > the 4200 is a better model?
    >



    I use the iP5000 for CDs, I am very happy with the quality of the
    output....I have only printed around 100~150 cds so far though. It is a
    bit slow to setup and print but for small occasional runs (10~40 every
    few months) it is fine.....if I was doing this say every day I would
    look at a unit with auto loading/unloading......

    regards

    Thing
    thing2, Feb 10, 2006
    #7
  8. Geoff M

    frederick Guest

    Fred Dagg wrote:
    > On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 10:34:45 +1300, frederick <>
    > exclaimed:
    >
    >
    >>Fred Dagg wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Thu, 9 Feb 2006 22:53:38 +1300, Geoff M
    >>><> exclaimed:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like the
    >>>>Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour print - I
    >>>>have a laser for everyday work.
    >>>>Any suggestions or recommendations?
    >>>>Geoff
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Honestly, it's not worth going past the Canon. They're miles ahead of
    >>>their competition in inkjet technologies.

    >>
    >>
    >>lol - tell HP and epson. Although canon do make some professional
    >>machines, HP and Epson dominate the pro market. I'm not saying that
    >>Canon are rubbish - but your comment is uninformed. As much as I
    >>dislike HP, for consumer inkjets, they are ahead in technology.
    >>
    >>If you really want to do only CDs and lots or them, then look here:
    >>http://www.primera.com/
    >>
    >>These are pro machines that have options to auto-load from a stack, and
    >>burn DVD/CD and print automatically. IIRC prices start at a few
    >>thousand dollars in NZ - not so expensive if you are doing a lot of
    >>CD/DVD printing/burning and your time is valuable.

    >
    >
    > We were talking consumer-level, not pro.
    >
    > And a comparable Canon would laugh at an HP, in the consumer-level
    > inkjet market.


    I disagree somewhat. There are big advantages to HP's disposable
    printhead/ink tank technology for low and occasional use home printers.
    For home photo printers, longevity with HP "vivera" inkset outperforms
    Canon's latest "Chroma Life 100" significantly. Several of HP's "home"
    photo printers (such as the 8450) also offer grey cartridges which allow
    printing of professional quality tone and metamerism free Black and
    white. They are the *only* consumer photo printers currently available
    with this. (the cheapest pro printer - Epson R2400 - that can do this
    costs almost $2,000).
    HP are also the first to offer printers with separate ink storage tanks
    feeding light-weight printheads with ink recycling from cleaning cycles
    - the HP8250 - a cheap home inkjet than can do pretty good photo quality
    fast, or text at an unbelievable 30+ ppm.
    A printer such as an HP 8450 photo printer is as good as Canon's best A4
    photo printer (8500) - yet costs only half as much (HP make up for that
    in ink costs).
    HP are the current leader in general inkjet technology and design.
    Epson are the leader in archival / commercial photo inkjet printing.
    Despite huge popularity with consumers - canon come 3rd.
    frederick, Feb 10, 2006
    #8
  9. Geoff M

    thing2 Guest

    Fred Dagg wrote:
    > On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 10:34:45 +1300, frederick <>
    > exclaimed:
    >
    >
    >>Fred Dagg wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Thu, 9 Feb 2006 22:53:38 +1300, Geoff M
    >>><> exclaimed:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like the
    >>>>Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour print - I
    >>>>have a laser for everyday work.
    >>>>Any suggestions or recommendations?
    >>>>Geoff
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Honestly, it's not worth going past the Canon. They're miles ahead of
    >>>their competition in inkjet technologies.

    >>
    >>
    >>lol - tell HP and epson. Although canon do make some professional
    >>machines, HP and Epson dominate the pro market. I'm not saying that
    >>Canon are rubbish - but your comment is uninformed. As much as I
    >>dislike HP, for consumer inkjets, they are ahead in technology.
    >>
    >>If you really want to do only CDs and lots or them, then look here:
    >>http://www.primera.com/
    >>
    >>These are pro machines that have options to auto-load from a stack, and
    >>burn DVD/CD and print automatically. IIRC prices start at a few
    >>thousand dollars in NZ - not so expensive if you are doing a lot of
    >>CD/DVD printing/burning and your time is valuable.

    >
    >
    > We were talking consumer-level, not pro.
    >
    > And a comparable Canon would laugh at an HP, in the consumer-level
    > inkjet market.



    I got a Canon iP5000 because of the high quality output, and low use and
    cost ink cartridges, HP could not compete IMHO. Now while people may
    argue the Canon will not last as long....I consider HP's have gone so
    far down hill in quality that I doubt that myself, plus over the life
    the Canon the cartridges say so mach that in TOC terms I think I will be
    ahead.

    regards

    Thing
    thing2, Feb 10, 2006
    #9
  10. Geoff M

    frederick Guest

    thing2 wrote:
    > I got a Canon iP5000 because of the high quality output, and low use and
    > cost ink cartridges, HP could not compete IMHO. Now while people may
    > argue the Canon will not last as long....I consider HP's have gone so
    > far down hill in quality that I doubt that myself, plus over the life
    > the Canon the cartridges say so mach that in TOC terms I think I will be
    > ahead.
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Thing
    >

    I reckon that you are partly right. IMO HP lost the plot a few years
    ago, and churned out some unreliable garbage at the cheap consumer end
    of things - IIRC the 3000(3820 etc?) series deskjets etc that had flimsy
    trouble-prone mechanisms that were not repairable, no parts available
    etc. Part of that may also have been international marketing and/or the
    local HP office's fault. I was attempting to repair one a few months
    ago, and my search for parts led me to find out that there weren't any
    parts available to repair an apparently very common fault (a broken
    nylon cog in the head maintenance tray mechanism). The other thing that
    google led me to was the fact that a printer that my client had paid
    $250 for in NZ was sold in supermarkets in the US for $29.95 and less.
    I think that HP may have seen the error of their ways lately - because
    the opinion you express is widespread and will have hurt their sales,
    and they are now making some quality and innovative consumer printers.
    frederick, Feb 10, 2006
    #10
  11. Geoff M

    thing2 Guest

    frederick wrote:
    > thing2 wrote:
    >
    >> I got a Canon iP5000 because of the high quality output, and low use
    >> and cost ink cartridges, HP could not compete IMHO. Now while people
    >> may argue the Canon will not last as long....I consider HP's have gone
    >> so far down hill in quality that I doubt that myself, plus over the
    >> life the Canon the cartridges say so mach that in TOC terms I think I
    >> will be ahead.
    >>
    >> regards
    >>
    >> Thing
    >>

    > I reckon that you are partly right. IMO HP lost the plot a few years
    > ago, and churned out some unreliable garbage at the cheap consumer end
    > of things - IIRC the 3000(3820 etc?) series deskjets etc that had flimsy
    > trouble-prone mechanisms that were not repairable, no parts available
    > etc. Part of that may also have been international marketing and/or the
    > local HP office's fault. I was attempting to repair one a few months
    > ago, and my search for parts led me to find out that there weren't any
    > parts available to repair an apparently very common fault (a broken
    > nylon cog in the head maintenance tray mechanism). The other thing that
    > google led me to was the fact that a printer that my client had paid
    > $250 for in NZ was sold in supermarkets in the US for $29.95 and less.
    > I think that HP may have seen the error of their ways lately - because
    > the opinion you express is widespread and will have hurt their sales,
    > and they are now making some quality and innovative consumer printers.



    I think someone commented that a company can destroy its reputation in
    one act and take 10 years to recover from it. I rate early HP printers,
    but from the HP 5/6l era on (circa 1998) they produced crap IMHO. I
    think there is nothing that should be more jealiously guarded than a
    company looking after its reputation.

    regards

    Thing
    thing2, Feb 10, 2006
    #11
  12. Geoff M

    frederick Guest

    thing2 wrote:
    > frederick wrote:
    >
    >> thing2 wrote:
    >>
    >>> I got a Canon iP5000 because of the high quality output, and low use
    >>> and cost ink cartridges, HP could not compete IMHO. Now while people
    >>> may argue the Canon will not last as long....I consider HP's have
    >>> gone so far down hill in quality that I doubt that myself, plus over
    >>> the life the Canon the cartridges say so mach that in TOC terms I
    >>> think I will be ahead.
    >>>
    >>> regards
    >>>
    >>> Thing
    >>>

    >> I reckon that you are partly right. IMO HP lost the plot a few years
    >> ago, and churned out some unreliable garbage at the cheap consumer end
    >> of things - IIRC the 3000(3820 etc?) series deskjets etc that had
    >> flimsy trouble-prone mechanisms that were not repairable, no parts
    >> available etc. Part of that may also have been international
    >> marketing and/or the local HP office's fault. I was attempting to
    >> repair one a few months ago, and my search for parts led me to find
    >> out that there weren't any parts available to repair an apparently
    >> very common fault (a broken nylon cog in the head maintenance tray
    >> mechanism). The other thing that google led me to was the fact that a
    >> printer that my client had paid $250 for in NZ was sold in
    >> supermarkets in the US for $29.95 and less.
    >> I think that HP may have seen the error of their ways lately - because
    >> the opinion you express is widespread and will have hurt their sales,
    >> and they are now making some quality and innovative consumer printers.

    >
    >
    >
    > I think someone commented that a company can destroy its reputation in
    > one act and take 10 years to recover from it. I rate early HP printers,
    > but from the HP 5/6l era on (circa 1998) they produced crap IMHO. I
    > think there is nothing that should be more jealiously guarded than a
    > company looking after its reputation.
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Thing
    >

    I agree.
    What I'm not so sure about these days is that genuine advice on product
    comparison can be relied upon in internet forums and usenet. One reason
    is that companies like HP (deservedly?) still get crap because of the
    error of their ways in the past. Another is that I strongly suspect
    that some well known companies employ and pay shills to post to forums,
    and that this has become a regular practice in competitive markets. I
    also wouldn't trust any reviews in any "E-zine" or magazine that
    prominantly feature product from that manufacturer in advertisements,
    and particularly those that have competitions with prizes and giveaways
    with product sponsored by that manufacturer. As they say, turkeys don't
    vote for xmas.
    frederick, Feb 10, 2006
    #12
  13. Geoff M

    Jerry Guest

    thing2 wrote:
    > Fred Dagg wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 10:34:45 +1300, frederick <>
    >> exclaimed:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Fred Dagg wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Thu, 9 Feb 2006 22:53:38 +1300, Geoff M
    >>>> <> exclaimed:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing
    >>>>> like the
    >>>>> Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour
    >>>>> print - I
    >>>>> have a laser for everyday work.
    >>>>> Any suggestions or recommendations?
    >>>>> Geoff
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Honestly, it's not worth going past the Canon. They're miles ahead of
    >>>> their competition in inkjet technologies.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> lol - tell HP and epson. Although canon do make some professional
    >>> machines, HP and Epson dominate the pro market. I'm not saying that
    >>> Canon are rubbish - but your comment is uninformed. As much as I
    >>> dislike HP, for consumer inkjets, they are ahead in technology.
    >>>
    >>> If you really want to do only CDs and lots or them, then look here:
    >>> http://www.primera.com/
    >>>
    >>> These are pro machines that have options to auto-load from a stack,
    >>> and burn DVD/CD and print automatically. IIRC prices start at a few
    >>> thousand dollars in NZ - not so expensive if you are doing a lot of
    >>> CD/DVD printing/burning and your time is valuable.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> We were talking consumer-level, not pro.
    >>
    >> And a comparable Canon would laugh at an HP, in the consumer-level
    >> inkjet market.

    >
    >
    >
    > I got a Canon iP5000 because of the high quality output, and low use and
    > cost ink cartridges, HP could not compete IMHO. Now while people may
    > argue the Canon will not last as long....I consider HP's have gone so
    > far down hill in quality that I doubt that myself, plus over the life
    > the Canon the cartridges say so mach that in TOC terms I think I will be
    > ahead.


    I will "me too" this one. I have a Canon iP4000r and I'm quite happy
    with it. The ink carts don't cost too much and seem to last a long
    time. The print quality is as good as my old eyes can discern, even
    with glasses :p . I print CDs for my own use, and am happy with the
    results. Certainly if I was printing hundreds of CDs a day I'd be
    looking for a professional solution. A nice thing with the iP4000r is
    that it is wireless and sits in a corner of the house all by itself,
    available to my whole HAN (household area network).

    I've had older HPs, and where I know that they have new technology, I'm
    quite happy with this printer. Thing's iP5000 will have somewhat better
    print quality than mine (smaller droplets) but that doesn't keep me from
    being happy with my printer, or thing with his!
    Jerry, Feb 10, 2006
    #13
  14. Geoff M

    Jerry Guest

    frederick wrote:
    > thing2 wrote:
    >
    >> frederick wrote:
    >>
    >>> thing2 wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I got a Canon iP5000 because of the high quality output, and low use
    >>>> and cost ink cartridges, HP could not compete IMHO. Now while people
    >>>> may argue the Canon will not last as long....I consider HP's have
    >>>> gone so far down hill in quality that I doubt that myself, plus over
    >>>> the life the Canon the cartridges say so mach that in TOC terms I
    >>>> think I will be ahead.
    >>>>
    >>>> regards
    >>>>
    >>>> Thing
    >>>>
    >>> I reckon that you are partly right. IMO HP lost the plot a few years
    >>> ago, and churned out some unreliable garbage at the cheap consumer
    >>> end of things - IIRC the 3000(3820 etc?) series deskjets etc that had
    >>> flimsy trouble-prone mechanisms that were not repairable, no parts
    >>> available etc. Part of that may also have been international
    >>> marketing and/or the local HP office's fault. I was attempting to
    >>> repair one a few months ago, and my search for parts led me to find
    >>> out that there weren't any parts available to repair an apparently
    >>> very common fault (a broken nylon cog in the head maintenance tray
    >>> mechanism). The other thing that google led me to was the fact that
    >>> a printer that my client had paid $250 for in NZ was sold in
    >>> supermarkets in the US for $29.95 and less.
    >>> I think that HP may have seen the error of their ways lately -
    >>> because the opinion you express is widespread and will have hurt
    >>> their sales, and they are now making some quality and innovative
    >>> consumer printers.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I think someone commented that a company can destroy its reputation in
    >> one act and take 10 years to recover from it. I rate early HP
    >> printers, but from the HP 5/6l era on (circa 1998) they produced crap
    >> IMHO. I think there is nothing that should be more jealiously guarded
    >> than a company looking after its reputation.
    >>
    >> regards
    >>
    >> Thing
    >>

    > I agree.
    > What I'm not so sure about these days is that genuine advice on product
    > comparison can be relied upon in internet forums and usenet. One reason
    > is that companies like HP (deservedly?) still get crap because of the
    > error of their ways in the past. Another is that I strongly suspect
    > that some well known companies employ and pay shills to post to forums,
    > and that this has become a regular practice in competitive markets. I
    > also wouldn't trust any reviews in any "E-zine" or magazine that
    > prominantly feature product from that manufacturer in advertisements,
    > and particularly those that have competitions with prizes and giveaways
    > with product sponsored by that manufacturer. As they say, turkeys don't
    > vote for xmas.


    It does take a long time to build a good reputation, and a short time to
    destroy it. A newsgroup opinion that says my printer is great therefore
    yours is crap doesn't have a lot of validity either. The newer HPs do
    look very good, especially in the higher ranges. Face it, if you buy a
    printer in the two digit numbers, it's a throw away (but has a year
    warranty). I'm happy with my Canon iP4000r, Thing likes his very
    similar iP5000 and there are some very nice HP printers out now. The
    new Canons have a chip in the inktank to discourage refills, I'm not
    sure how that affects the cost of the cartridge. Think and I have just
    tanks (like just juice I guess, like a man after a vasectomy).

    I fully agree with Frederick that a review in a forum that includes an
    advertisement for the reviewed product must be highly suspect, and I
    suspect more prevalent.
    Jerry, Feb 10, 2006
    #14
  15. Geoff M

    S Roby Guest

    In article <>, Chris Hope <> wrote:
    >Geoff M wrote:
    >
    >> I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like
    >> the Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour
    >> print - I have a laser for everyday work.
    >> Any suggestions or recommendations?

    >
    >I use a Canon Pixma IP3000 for printing CDs and it's been really good
    >(I've printed about 4000 CDs and DVDs with it so far). I would assume
    >the 4200 is a better model?


    Ive a 3000 also & I highly recommend it (even thou no longer available)
    Its duplex, always a bounus.
    Good thing is the ink carts hold a descentish amount of ink & aftermarket
    carts are cheap
    S Roby, Feb 10, 2006
    #15
  16. Geoff M

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "frederick" <> wrote in message
    news:1139520735.313443@ftpsrv1...
    > Fred Dagg wrote:
    >> On Thu, 9 Feb 2006 22:53:38 +1300, Geoff M
    >> <> exclaimed:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I am looking at getting a printer that will do CDs - some thing like the
    >>>Canon Pixma 4200. The main use will be CDs, and the odd colour print - I
    >>>have a laser for everyday work.
    >>>Any suggestions or recommendations?
    >>>Geoff

    >>
    >>
    >> Honestly, it's not worth going past the Canon. They're miles ahead of
    >> their competition in inkjet technologies.

    >
    >
    > lol - tell HP and epson. Although canon do make some professional
    > machines, HP and Epson dominate the pro market. I'm not saying that Canon
    > are rubbish - but your comment is uninformed. As much as I dislike HP,
    > for consumer inkjets, they are ahead in technology.


    LOL
    You have no idea what you're talking about. Paper handling on budget HPs is
    crap, and they can't do good quality borderless prints that the budget
    Canons can.
    The upper range HPs are probably a lot better - they'd have to be.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Feb 10, 2006
    #16
  17. Geoff M

    thingy Guest

    Jerry wrote:
    > frederick wrote:
    >
    >> thing2 wrote:
    >>
    >>> frederick wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> thing2 wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I got a Canon iP5000 because of the high quality output, and low
    >>>>> use and cost ink cartridges, HP could not compete IMHO. Now while
    >>>>> people may argue the Canon will not last as long....I consider HP's
    >>>>> have gone so far down hill in quality that I doubt that myself,
    >>>>> plus over the life the Canon the cartridges say so mach that in TOC
    >>>>> terms I think I will be ahead.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> regards
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thing
    >>>>>
    >>>> I reckon that you are partly right. IMO HP lost the plot a few
    >>>> years ago, and churned out some unreliable garbage at the cheap
    >>>> consumer end of things - IIRC the 3000(3820 etc?) series deskjets
    >>>> etc that had flimsy trouble-prone mechanisms that were not
    >>>> repairable, no parts available etc. Part of that may also have been
    >>>> international marketing and/or the local HP office's fault. I was
    >>>> attempting to repair one a few months ago, and my search for parts
    >>>> led me to find out that there weren't any parts available to repair
    >>>> an apparently very common fault (a broken nylon cog in the head
    >>>> maintenance tray mechanism). The other thing that google led me to
    >>>> was the fact that a printer that my client had paid $250 for in NZ
    >>>> was sold in supermarkets in the US for $29.95 and less.
    >>>> I think that HP may have seen the error of their ways lately -
    >>>> because the opinion you express is widespread and will have hurt
    >>>> their sales, and they are now making some quality and innovative
    >>>> consumer printers.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I think someone commented that a company can destroy its reputation
    >>> in one act and take 10 years to recover from it. I rate early HP
    >>> printers, but from the HP 5/6l era on (circa 1998) they produced crap
    >>> IMHO. I think there is nothing that should be more jealiously guarded
    >>> than a company looking after its reputation.
    >>>
    >>> regards
    >>>
    >>> Thing
    >>>

    >> I agree.
    >> What I'm not so sure about these days is that genuine advice on
    >> product comparison can be relied upon in internet forums and usenet.
    >> One reason is that companies like HP (deservedly?) still get crap
    >> because of the error of their ways in the past. Another is that I
    >> strongly suspect that some well known companies employ and pay shills
    >> to post to forums, and that this has become a regular practice in
    >> competitive markets. I also wouldn't trust any reviews in any
    >> "E-zine" or magazine that prominantly feature product from that
    >> manufacturer in advertisements, and particularly those that have
    >> competitions with prizes and giveaways with product sponsored by that
    >> manufacturer. As they say, turkeys don't vote for xmas.

    >
    >
    > It does take a long time to build a good reputation, and a short time to
    > destroy it. A newsgroup opinion that says my printer is great therefore
    > yours is crap doesn't have a lot of validity either. The newer HPs do
    > look very good, especially in the higher ranges. Face it, if you buy a
    > printer in the two digit numbers, it's a throw away (but has a year
    > warranty). I'm happy with my Canon iP4000r, Thing likes his very
    > similar iP5000 and there are some very nice HP printers out now. The
    > new Canons have a chip in the inktank to discourage refills, I'm not
    > sure how that affects the cost of the cartridge. Think and I have just
    > tanks (like just juice I guess, like a man after a vasectomy).
    >
    > I fully agree with Frederick that a review in a forum that includes an
    > advertisement for the reviewed product must be highly suspect, and I
    > suspect more prevalent.
    >


    Hmm yes....

    I went looking for a kayak last year, I almsot subscribed to a mag based
    in Auckland, but after reading it a few times, I got a frown...so I
    looked at the editorial....guess what the "independant" magazine was
    closely affiliated with certian kayak shops and kayak companies....the
    articles all dripped with good points and didnt seem to mention the bad
    ones..(I have rented and used different kayaks for years, so I know some
    have weaknesses) Over a few months other good kayaks were not
    mentioned...(I quite like one called storm, an older design and a bit
    heavy but Ive found it seaworthy myself).

    Then I emailed Q-kayaks about 2 or 3 in their range and they recommended
    an article....I read it and decided the magazine was nothing more than
    marketing blurb tyed up in a mag....ie worthless....so why would I want
    to subscribe in order to receive adverts?

    Recently I happened to look at some of my youngest's mags and thought
    wow, weekly Disney Press releases for only $5.95.....

    Take wikipedia, the US politicans keep editing its pages to make
    themselves look good...

    Or the Microsoft employees who are allowed bogs.....

    So now I wonder just how much if any information out there can be trusted?

    I now think that in order to get a fair assessment of a product on line
    you have to go and dig considerably, not so much for independant reviews
    but looking for reviews that all sound the same....marketing cannot
    resist sending to everyone the same blurb, and cheap jounalists/ mags
    who have sold out reguritated so if the tone sounds similar.....I
    discount it.

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Feb 11, 2006
    #17
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