Infrared

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Sergi, Jun 6, 2004.

  1. Sergi

    Sergi Guest

    Can anyone tell me how to take infrared photos with a digital camera?
    Thanks.
    Sergi, Jun 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. Sergi

    orion Guest

    Find an old remote control- yes TV audio etc, and canabalise it for the
    little piece of plastic at the front of the sensor- seal that in front of
    the lens- and there you go-only infrared light gets thru. There are of
    course much more sophisticated techniques , but that will get you a trial in
    five minutes for free...

    "Sergi" <> wrote in message news:c9ul2v$ke6$...
    > Can anyone tell me how to take infrared photos with a digital camera?
    > Thanks.
    >
    >
    orion, Jun 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. Sergi

    PhAnTOmaS Guest

    wow, cheap trick. I'm gonna try this :D

    "orion" <> escribió en el mensaje
    news:tgBwc.1136$...
    > Find an old remote control- yes TV audio etc, and canabalise it for the
    > little piece of plastic at the front of the sensor- seal that in front of
    > the lens- and there you go-only infrared light gets thru. There are of
    > course much more sophisticated techniques , but that will get you a trial

    in
    > five minutes for free...
    >
    > "Sergi" <> wrote in message news:c9ul2v$ke6$...
    > > Can anyone tell me how to take infrared photos with a digital camera?
    > > Thanks.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    PhAnTOmaS, Jun 6, 2004
    #3
  4. "Sergi" <> writes:

    > Can anyone tell me how to take infrared photos with a digital camera?


    It works with the vast majority of digital cameras. There's an easy
    test -- shine an infrared remote into the camera, and watch the
    preview on the LCD (or take a picture if you don't have LCD preview).
    If the infrared emitter diode of the remote shows up bright white when
    the remote is transmitting, then your camera has enough infrared
    sensitivity to use.

    Put a suitable infrared filter, such as the Hoya R72, over the lens,
    and shoot away.

    If it's not a digital SLR, the focus, exposure, preview, and
    everything will work fine. You'll find the sensitivity is lower, and
    may need to use a tripod or other camera support to avoid shake with
    the longer shutter speeds.

    If it is a digital SLR (and hence doesn't have preview on the lcd, and
    does the autofocus and autoexposure based on independent sensors),
    it's harder, but not actually hard. You have to establish a workable
    exposure manually (easy by reviewing test shots on the LCD). And you
    need to adjust the focus! Older 35mm lenses always had a little red
    mark to show the infrared focus point; you would focus the lens
    normally, then offset it from the usual focus index mark to the
    infrared index mark, and your infrared pictures would then be in sharp
    focus. Depending on the exact lens construction and the distance to
    your subject and the aperture you're shooting at, it may not matter
    much; depth of field may cover it.

    Direct sun is the easiest lighting to shoot infrared in. Green
    foliage is the thing that looks most strikingly different in the
    infrared than in visible light.

    Here are some infrared shots of mine:
    <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/gallery/Digital%20Infrared%20October%202001/>
    <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/2003/08260-Weird%20Tech/>
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
    David Dyer-Bennet, Jun 6, 2004
    #4
  5. Sergi

    stewy Guest

    "Sergi" <> wrote in message news:c9ul2v$ke6$...
    > Can anyone tell me how to take infrared photos with a digital camera?



    Check first to see if your camera has a thread for a filter, if so, get an
    extension tube as most digital lenses extend forward.

    You need to get an Hoya R72 filter. Take picture in the 'night-time' mode -
    usually a moon/star symbol. You will need a tripod as the shutter speed will
    be a second or more.

    The resulting pictures will have either a reddish or orange cast. In
    Photoshop, Desaturate then adjust the Levels to increase contrast - and
    there you are!

    As for subject matter, broadleaf trees, grass and ivy etc are very strong
    reflectors of InfraRed while buildings and tree trunks are not. Try to
    photograph isolated trees with the sun behind you or to one side. The sky
    (and water) will appear much darker and clouds will be more prominent.

    I usually have a 25% success rate - i.e. pictures I am quite satisfied with
    and perhaps 1 or 2 very pleasing shots (out of a set of about 50-60). Keep
    shooting as much as possible the first time to see what works and what
    doesn't. But it's very hit-and-miss sometimes, shots which I thought would
    work, didn't and others surprised me by being much better than expected.

    Good luck and let us know what happened!
    stewy, Jun 7, 2004
    #5
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