Infrared photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Kelly, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. Kelly

    Kelly Guest

    I am interesting in shooting IR photography and would like to achieve
    images with a continuous false colour scheme of magenta and cyan that
    I've seen on the internet. I've also seen something like duotones of
    cyan and white or magenta and white or just plain B&W and was
    wondering how one goes about getting the false colours? Is this a
    property of the camera (I'm using an Olympus 5050), the filter (will
    get a Hoya R72), or Photoshop work?

    Thank you,

    Kelly
     
    Kelly, Apr 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. Kelly

    B.A.S. Guest

    Kelly wrote:

    > I am interesting in shooting IR photography and would like to achieve
    > images with a continuous false colour scheme of magenta and cyan that
    > I've seen on the internet. I've also seen something like duotones of
    > cyan and white or magenta and white or just plain B&W and was
    > wondering how one goes about getting the false colours? Is this a
    > property of the camera (I'm using an Olympus 5050), the filter (will
    > get a Hoya R72), or Photoshop work?
    >
    > Thank you,
    >
    > Kelly


    As I understand it, some cameras are more sensitive to IR than others
    (ie, they filter out less of it).

    In general, if you shoot in color, you get the 'false color effects', if
    you shoot in Black and White (or convert later), you get more
    traditional B&W IR effects.

    Here's a web page with some info WRT the 5050 and IR:

    http://www.molon.de/5050.html

    Doesn't look to be the greatest camera for IR, but with stronger filters
    (like the Wratten 89b) and some Photoshop tweaking you can do pretty
    well (at least in B&W, from what I've seen people exhibiting on the web):

    http://pbase.com/drbobhesse/inbox

    Hope this helps (I'm about to give IR a shot with my new D70, but am
    choking on the the cost of 67mm+ filters! I did a fair amount of it with
    my old Nikon 950, which was quite sensitive to IR, but focus was a
    challenge.).

    Good luck,

    B.A.S.
     
    B.A.S., Apr 27, 2004
    #2
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  3. Kelly

    Don Guest

    I've done a limited amount of IR with my Canon G2. If you use an IR filter,
    between the filter and the focal plane response curve you're pretty much
    left with a fairly narrow band of IR to which all three CCD chanels respond,
    although not equally. It isn't clear how I could turn that into false color
    images. There may be some post processing trickery involved

    I've played with each of the individual channels, and find that the green
    channel alone gives about as good a S/N ratio as mixing all three channels.
    YMMV however.

    Don

    "Kelly" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am interesting in shooting IR photography and would like to achieve
    > images with a continuous false colour scheme of magenta and cyan that
    > I've seen on the internet. I've also seen something like duotones of
    > cyan and white or magenta and white or just plain B&W and was
    > wondering how one goes about getting the false colours? Is this a
    > property of the camera (I'm using an Olympus 5050), the filter (will
    > get a Hoya R72), or Photoshop work?
    >
    > Thank you,
    >
    > Kelly
     
    Don, Apr 27, 2004
    #3
  4. Kelly

    Don Stauffer Guest

    The false colored IR images you see are typically done in electronic
    post-processing. Any good photo editor that has a magic wand color
    selection tool can do it, but manually and it is a bit of work. If you
    are capable of writing image processing software, you can write software
    that does it automatically from a monochrome (grey scale) image, but
    most photo editors available to average person can only do this
    manually. It is not done by any sort of optical filtering.

    Kelly wrote:
    >
    > I am interesting in shooting IR photography and would like to achieve
    > images with a continuous false colour scheme of magenta and cyan that
    > I've seen on the internet. I've also seen something like duotones of
    > cyan and white or magenta and white or just plain B&W and was
    > wondering how one goes about getting the false colours? Is this a
    > property of the camera (I'm using an Olympus 5050), the filter (will
    > get a Hoya R72), or Photoshop work?
    >
    > Thank you,
    >
    > Kelly


    --
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

    webpage- http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer
     
    Don Stauffer, Apr 28, 2004
    #4
  5. Kelly

    Guest

    In message <>,
    Don Stauffer <> wrote:

    >If you
    >are capable of writing image processing software, you can write software
    >that does it automatically from a monochrome (grey scale) image, but
    >most photo editors available to average person can only do this
    >manually. It is not done by any sort of optical filtering.


    Photoshops needs a good 16-bit or even floating-point update to Filter
    Factory, with transcendental functions, and variables for hue,
    saturation, and luminance, etc. I don't understand why a $600
    professional program doesn't include something as basic as this.
    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    , May 1, 2004
    #5
  6. Kelly

    Paul H. Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In message <>,
    > Don Stauffer <> wrote:
    >
    > >If you
    > >are capable of writing image processing software, you can write software
    > >that does it automatically from a monochrome (grey scale) image, but
    > >most photo editors available to average person can only do this
    > >manually. It is not done by any sort of optical filtering.

    >
    > Photoshops needs a good 16-bit or even floating-point update to Filter
    > Factory, with transcendental functions, and variables for hue,
    > saturation, and luminance, etc. I don't understand why a $600
    > professional program doesn't include something as basic as this.



    Let me explain it to you, then: Adobe is making oodles of money from
    Photoshop the way it is now and since Adobe has no serious competitor to
    Photoshop among graphics professionals, there's little impetus for them to
    change their business practices. If you own the only ice-cream store in
    town, you can forego putting the crushed peanuts atop your ice-cream
    sundaes. However, if a competitor moves in next door, starts using peanuts
    AND charges the same amout as you charge per sundae, then you'll either chop
    nuts or watch your business go belly-up.

    In the absence of competition, the invisible hand of the marketplace
    occasionally slaps consumers in the face. Asi es la vida.

    Compounding the problem, of course, is the absolute stupidity of many
    consumers: Adobe could probably remove features from its next release of
    Photoshop and yet 90% of its customer base would buy the product anway out
    of mindless brand-loyalty. Not to mention those ever-present weasels who
    seek status in reflected glory, e.g., "Photoshop's the best, so if I buy it,
    I'LL BE THE BEST, TOO!"

    So now you understand :)
     
    Paul H., May 1, 2004
    #6
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