info wanted on how to make a mail server on ms xp home mach

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by goneill, Aug 7, 2003.

  1. goneill

    goneill Guest

    At work we have just switched to a new domain and I got handed the job
    of setting up the email .
    They want each machine in the network to have an email each.
    1st tests showed that a mail server is needed to download the emails then
    distribute
    to each machine (4 others)
    How do you configure a machine to do this or point to a site(s) that give
    instructions

    gary
    goneill, Aug 7, 2003
    #1
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  2. On Thu, 7 Aug 2003 21:00:54 +1200, "goneill" <>
    wrote:

    >At work we have just switched to a new domain and I got handed the job
    >of setting up the email .
    >They want each machine in the network to have an email each.
    >1st tests showed that a mail server is needed to download the emails then
    >distribute
    >to each machine (4 others)
    >How do you configure a machine to do this or point to a site(s) that give
    >instructions



    You would need mail server software such as MDaemon or similar, this
    feature is not built into Windows XP Home.

    http://www.altn.com/Default.asp

    Assuming you store your entire domain's mail in one mailbox, the mail
    server software will have to connect to this mailbox (MDaemon calls it
    "DomainPOP") then sift through the mail reading the headers to
    determine who owns each mail, then giving the rest to the postmaster.
    You would then set up mailboxes in MDaemon for each user on your
    network, with their own pop3 username and password. Then, on each
    machine on your network, set the machine running MDaemon (or mail
    server software that you choose) IP address to be your POP3 and SMTP
    server; using the POP3 username/password you specified under that
    mailbox in the mail server configuration.

    You'll probably get some people on this newsgroup telling you to run
    the mailserver on an old machine running Linux. This is probably also
    a good idea, and will save on cost. However, I've never seen a Linux
    mail server that's as easy to set up as MDaemon, unless someone can
    point me in the direction of one. :)


    --
    Kristofer Clayton (KJClayton)
    Gisborne, New Zealand
    Kristofer Clayton, Aug 7, 2003
    #2
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  3. goneill

    Matt B Guest

    In news:p,
    Uncle StoatWarbler <> wrote:
    > On Thu, 07 Aug 2003 22:59:49 +1200, Kristofer Clayton wrote:
    >
    >> Assuming you store your entire domain's mail in one mailbox, the mail
    >> server software will have to connect to this mailbox (MDaemon calls
    >> it "DomainPOP") then sift through the mail reading the headers to
    >> determine who owns each mail, then giving the rest to the postmaster.

    >
    > Mdaemon has a nasty habit of sending messages which are Bcced to the
    > local user out to the person on the To: line.


    Really? It's sends mail to the person in the 'To:' line?

    I'm not sure I know what you mean, but I'm pretty sure I've never (or
    always?) seen it...

    >> You'll probably get some people on this newsgroup telling you to run
    >> the mailserver on an old machine running Linux. This is probably also
    >> a good idea, and will save on cost. However, I've never seen a Linux
    >> mail server that's as easy to set up as MDaemon, unless someone can
    >> point me in the direction of one. :)

    >
    > If you want to run brokenware to make a _SINGLE-USER_ mailbox perform
    > a function it wasn't designed for, then that's up to you, but don't
    > expect any sympathy when you get whapped for having it annoying
    > others.


    Huh?

    --
    Regards,

    Matt B
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    There are 10 types of people.
    Those who get binary...
    And those who don't.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Matt B, Aug 7, 2003
    #3
  4. On Thu, 07 Aug 2003 13:09:58 +0000, "Uncle StoatWarbler"
    <> wrote:

    >> You'll probably get some people on this newsgroup telling you to run
    >> the mailserver on an old machine running Linux. This is probably also
    >> a good idea, and will save on cost. However, I've never seen a Linux
    >> mail server that's as easy to set up as MDaemon, unless someone can
    >> point me in the direction of one. :)

    >
    >If you want to run brokenware to make a _SINGLE-USER_ mailbox perform a
    >function it wasn't designed for, then that's up to you, but don't expect
    >any sympathy when you get whapped for having it annoying others.


    It's true that getting POP to do the job it was never intended for
    (it's no where near as good as a dedicated SMTP server or getting it
    to poll via ETRN), but for some companies that are either on dial-up
    or not able to/not want a static IP, DomainPOP provides a good service
    and has less chance of going down than, say, erm, MDaemon :)

    P.S. Have never seen it send BCC: to the To: person. Perhaps some
    configuration issue. Which version(s) of MDaemon did you see that bug
    in?


    --
    Kristofer Clayton (KJClayton)
    Gisborne, New Zealand
    Kristofer Clayton, Aug 7, 2003
    #4
  5. On Fri, 08 Aug 2003 01:04:46 +1200, Kristofer Clayton wrote:

    > P.S. Have never seen it send BCC: to the To: person. Perhaps some
    > configuration issue. Which version(s) of MDaemon did you see that bug
    > in?


    Various early ones. As the upstream postmaster I got the double bounces
    when the To: line was undeliverable and the From: line was forged.
    Uncle StoatWarbler, Aug 7, 2003
    #5
  6. goneill

    AD. Guest

    goneill wrote:

    > At work we have just switched to a new domain and I got handed the job
    > of setting up the email .
    > They want each machine in the network to have an email each.
    > 1st tests showed that a mail server is needed to download the emails then
    > distribute
    > to each machine (4 others)


    You need to explain more about what you have/want.

    Does the mail for each user get collected in POP3 boxes at an ISP?

    Do you want a wildcard POP3 mailbox at the ISP to catch everything not
    explicitly sent to the other boxes?

    Do you have a static IP and full time connection?

    Is you network all XP Home?

    Things to consider:

    Don't make the email per machine - make it per user. If they have to roam
    around from machine to machine, give them seperate logins and use IMAP
    internally - it also makes backing up a lot easier.

    MDaemon is pretty good - it was my first mail server about 7 yrs ago (I use
    a combo of Postfix and Exchange now, although Exchanges days are numbered
    hopefully). New versions of MDaemon now have things like IMAP, webmail,
    groupware, AV etc.

    Wildcarded POP3 mailboxes are very ugly technically (POP3 removes the SMTP
    envelope and was only intended as a final destination), but you can
    probably get away with it if your users don't use mailing lists. MDaemon
    can do this stuff, but I'd recommend getting dedicated POP3 mailboxes at
    the ISP for each user.

    Mercury Mail from NZ is free, and might suit you if you can get a fulltime
    SMTP connection and MX record. That has other downsides though. I also
    don't think Mercury can do IMAP.

    The best solution would be IF (big if) your ISP could queue mail for your
    domain, and you could then dequeue it using SMTP. MDaemon can do this, not
    sure if Mercury can though.

    Cheers
    Anton
    AD., Aug 7, 2003
    #6
  7. goneill

    Chris Mayhew Guest

    "goneill" <> wrote in news:3f321635$:

    > At work we have just switched to a new domain and I got handed the job
    > of setting up the email .
    > They want each machine in the network to have an email each.
    > 1st tests showed that a mail server is needed to download the emails then
    > distribute
    > to each machine (4 others)
    > How do you configure a machine to do this or point to a site(s) that give
    > instructions
    >
    > gary
    >
    >


    You might like to look at:
    http://www.pmail.com/
    They have a mail server called Mercury, there are 2 good news groups, the
    software is free but you can buy printed manuals (which gives you tech
    support) and it is written in NZ.

    --
    Chris Mayhew using Xnews !
    Chris Mayhew, Aug 8, 2003
    #7
  8. goneill

    AD. Guest

    Evans Leung wrote:

    > Mercury 3.32 (latest version) can handle IMAP. URL is
    > http://www.pmail.com
    >
    > i have setup a few Mercury systems, either a domain mailbox situation or a
    > direct smtp connection and it works perfectly.


    That's good to hear. Mercury would be a good choice then.

    >
    >> The best solution would be IF (big if) your ISP could queue mail for your
    >> domain, and you could then dequeue it using SMTP. MDaemon can do this,
    >> not sure if Mercury can though.

    >
    > if u are on a dedicated internet connection then use SMTP otherwise
    > forward all your queued outgoing emails to your ISP's smtp server.


    Right, but I was talking about using having the ISP queue incoming mail,
    then periodially connecting and using the ETRN command (an SMTP extension)
    to 'dequeue' the waiting mail. SMTP all the way - no intermediate POP3 step
    or fulltime connection required. The only issue is finding an ISP that
    supports it - as I've never needed it I don't know how (un)common that
    would be.

    MDaemon and Exchange can use that, and after some research it also sounds
    like Mercury supports that too.

    Cheers
    Anton
    AD., Aug 8, 2003
    #8
  9. I would like to add my support for Mercury.
    I have set this up at our company (running on Win98 on a 486) and it runs
    flawlessly. We are on dial up and use a domain mailbox, although it can be
    set up as a proper mail server if you have a static ip. Setup is
    straightforward and (free) documentation is pretty good. Can be configured
    for spam filtering and virus checking etc. plus lots more if you want. I
    have also found the IMAP support good for storing mail in one location for
    backups and for sharing information easily without forwarding
    multi-copies/large attachments to everybody who needs to know.

    Fred


    "AD." <> wrote in message
    news:bgv2bt$tbinp$-berlin.de...
    > Evans Leung wrote:
    >
    > > Mercury 3.32 (latest version) can handle IMAP. URL is
    > > http://www.pmail.com
    > >
    > > i have setup a few Mercury systems, either a domain mailbox situation or

    a
    > > direct smtp connection and it works perfectly.

    >
    > That's good to hear. Mercury would be a good choice then.
    >
    > >
    > >> The best solution would be IF (big if) your ISP could queue mail for

    your
    > >> domain, and you could then dequeue it using SMTP. MDaemon can do this,
    > >> not sure if Mercury can though.

    > >
    > > if u are on a dedicated internet connection then use SMTP otherwise
    > > forward all your queued outgoing emails to your ISP's smtp server.

    >
    > Right, but I was talking about using having the ISP queue incoming mail,
    > then periodially connecting and using the ETRN command (an SMTP extension)
    > to 'dequeue' the waiting mail. SMTP all the way - no intermediate POP3

    step
    > or fulltime connection required. The only issue is finding an ISP that
    > supports it - as I've never needed it I don't know how (un)common that
    > would be.
    >
    > MDaemon and Exchange can use that, and after some research it also sounds
    > like Mercury supports that too.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Anton
    Fred the Fish, Aug 8, 2003
    #9
  10. goneill

    pete Guest

    "Chris Mayhew" <> wrote in message
    news:1fBYa.9886$...
    > "goneill" <> wrote in news:3f321635$:
    >
    > > At work we have just switched to a new domain and I got handed the job
    > > of setting up the email .
    > > They want each machine in the network to have an email each.
    > > 1st tests showed that a mail server is needed to download the emails

    then
    > > distribute
    > > to each machine (4 others)
    > > How do you configure a machine to do this or point to a site(s) that

    give
    > > instructions
    > >
    > > gary
    > >
    > >

    >
    > You might like to look at:
    > http://www.pmail.com/
    > They have a mail server called Mercury, there are 2 good news groups, the
    > software is free but you can buy printed manuals (which gives you tech
    > support) and it is written in NZ.
    >
    > --
    > Chris Mayhew using Xnews !


    Mitel SME (aka E-Smith) running on a low-mid spec pentium)
    The e-mail retrieval mode can be set to standard
    (for dedicated Internet connections), ETRN
    (recommended for dialup connections), or multi-drop
    (for dialup connections if ETRN is not supported by your
    Internet provider).

    Linux and free for the downloading.
    Support available if required (at a price)
    pete, Aug 8, 2003
    #10
  11. goneill

    Rob King Guest

    "goneill" <> wrote in message
    news:3f321635$...
    > At work we have just switched to a new domain and I got handed the job
    > of setting up the email .
    > They want each machine in the network to have an email each.
    > 1st tests showed that a mail server is needed to download the emails then
    > distribute
    > to each machine (4 others)
    > How do you configure a machine to do this or point to a site(s) that give
    > instructions


    Check out Kerio MailServer (www.kerio.com). Dead simple to setup. I used
    to use MDaemon but gave that up as I found it had a cluttered interface.
    Kerio is nice and clean. It also integrates nicely with their Firewall
    product (good if you're looking at sharing an internet connection at a later
    stage).

    If you want a freebie server, then check out Mercury/32 from
    www.pmail.gen.nz

    BTW, both do POP mail downloads and redistributions.
    Rob King, Aug 8, 2003
    #11
  12. goneill

    Chris Mayhew Guest

    "pete" <> wrote in
    news:b_IYa.10028$:

    >>
    >> You might like to look at:
    >> http://www.pmail.com/
    >> They have a mail server called Mercury, there are 2 good news groups,
    >> the software is free but you can buy printed manuals (which gives you
    >> tech support) and it is written in NZ.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Chris Mayhew using Xnews !

    >
    > Mitel SME (aka E-Smith) running on a low-mid spec pentium)
    > The e-mail retrieval mode can be set to standard
    > (for dedicated Internet connections), ETRN
    > (recommended for dialup connections), or multi-drop
    > (for dialup connections if ETRN is not supported by your
    > Internet provider).
    >
    > Linux and free for the downloading.
    > Support available if required (at a price)
    >
    >
    >


    Well Fred the Fish has Mercury running on a 486, so there :p :)

    --
    Chris Mayhew using Xnews !
    Chris Mayhew, Aug 8, 2003
    #12
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