Infant newbie question ......

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Steve B, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    What photography NG is it where binaries are posted?

    Steve
     
    Steve B, Dec 30, 2012
    #1
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  2. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:2012123009104740977-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    > On 2012-12-30 09:03:19 -0800, Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com>
    > said:
    >
    >> On 2012-12-30 08:55:23 -0800, "Steve B" <> said:
    >>
    >>> What photography NG is it where binaries are posted?
    >>>
    >>> Steve

    >>
    >> alt.binaries.photos.original

    >
    > There is also nothing wrong with using one of the image sharing sites, or
    > "cloud" storage sites, such as Dropbox, Google drive, or PogoPlug, to post
    > examples of your work to the non-binary sites.
    >
    > Something like this.
    > < http://db.tt/6SuM0WTp >
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    >
    > Savageduck


    Apologies, guys. My computer has a glitch, and it is time to take it to the
    shop. Things are hanging in the outbox, and this is a duplicate of a
    similar post that I sent yesterday, and did not see posted. I checked a
    little, and it looks like the aioe.org I currently have does not have much
    in binaries. We recently moved to rural ranch land, and there is a limited
    amount of anything available here. So, I'll need to check with my computer
    guy and have him set it to what's available here, as well as look at a
    couple of other issues I've been having with it.

    Didn't mean to post duplicates.

    Sorry.

    Steve
     
    Steve B, Dec 31, 2012
    #2
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  3. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:2012123009104740977-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    > On 2012-12-30 09:03:19 -0800, Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com>
    > said:
    >
    >> On 2012-12-30 08:55:23 -0800, "Steve B" <> said:
    >>
    >>> What photography NG is it where binaries are posted?
    >>>
    >>> Steve

    >>
    >> alt.binaries.photos.original

    >
    > There is also nothing wrong with using one of the image sharing sites, or
    > "cloud" storage sites, such as Dropbox, Google drive, or PogoPlug, to post
    > examples of your work to the non-binary sites.
    >
    > Something like this.
    > < http://db.tt/6SuM0WTp >
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    >
    > Savageduck


    Awesome picture. My dad was a flight engineer on a B-24M in the Pacific
    Theater. He got four bronze stars. Never ever spoke a word about it.

    Steve
     
    Steve B, Dec 31, 2012
    #3
  4. On 30-Dec-12 19:53, Savagefuck wrote:

    >> Awesome picture. My dad was a flight engineer on a B-24M in the Pacific
    >> Theater. He got four bronze stars. Never ever spoke a word about it.
    >>
    >> Steve

    >
    > If your dad flew in that B24 in the SW Pacific, New Guinea, Rabaul,
    > Bismark Archipelago, Borneo, Philippines, 1943-44, he might well have
    > had my father flying escort for him.


    Your father spent most of his time sucking off pilots and massaging Jap
    balls whilst letting the gooks cornhole him.
     
    Kwincay Ercolinowitz, Dec 31, 2012
    #4
  5. Steve B

    Mayayana Guest

    | > Awesome picture. My dad was a flight engineer on a B-24M in the Pacific
    | > Theater. He got four bronze stars. Never ever spoke a word about it.
    |
    | If your dad flew in that B24 in the SW Pacific, New Guinea, Rabaul,
    | Bismark Archipelago, Borneo, Philippines, 1943-44, he might well have
    | had my father flying escort for him.
    |

    Interesting. My father was a test pilot on Guam.
    He never used to talk about it (and we never
    cared to ask him :) but he talks about it now.
    As he approaches the end, that time stands out in
    his memory. I think for many in that generation
    WW2 was the most alive they ever felt.
     
    Mayayana, Dec 31, 2012
    #5
  6. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    "Mayayana" <> wrote

    >
    > Interesting. My father was a test pilot on Guam.
    > He never used to talk about it (and we never
    > cared to ask him :) but he talks about it now.
    > As he approaches the end, that time stands out in
    > his memory. I think for many in that generation
    > WW2 was the most alive they ever felt.


    I did not have to go to Viet Nam because of a heart condition. Most of the
    guys I talked to said the thing that was in the forefront of their mind was
    staying alive for XXX more days until their departure date, and never
    knowing if the guy who was going to get you was going to be in uniform, or
    some twelve year old that just got walked away from a bike bomb with a
    timer.

    I have PTSD from various career work situations. Being in a situation where
    you can die at any moment, and being there for months at a time is an
    attitude adjustment that may or may not go away.

    Thanks to your dad for his service to our country.

    Steve
     
    Steve B, Dec 31, 2012
    #6
  7. Steve B

    Mayayana Guest

    | Here is my father's squadron, the 9th Fighter Sq. 49th Fighter Group,
    | in New Guinea in 1944. He is 5th from the left.
    | < http://db.tt/1i11XB3H >

    That's a nice picture. Very atmospheric.

    I guess we know we're getting old when we
    start waxing sentimental about WWII. :)

    |
    | ...and Dad in his P-38L, also somewhere in New Guinea in 1944.
    | < http://db.tt/TIkmcOpu >
    |
    | He is 89, 90 in July, and in good health.
    | < http://db.tt/sOCXRlPs >
    |
    |
    | --
    | Regards,
    |
    | Savageduck
    |
     
    Mayayana, Dec 31, 2012
    #7
  8. Steve B

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 10:40:27 -0500, "Mayayana" <>
    wrote:
    : | Here is my father's squadron, the 9th Fighter Sq. 49th Fighter Group,
    : | in New Guinea in 1944. He is 5th from the left.
    : | < http://db.tt/1i11XB3H >
    :
    : That's a nice picture. Very atmospheric.
    :
    : I guess we know we're getting old when we
    : start waxing sentimental about WWII. :)

    You've got that right. WW II is very sentimental to me. I was four years old
    when the Pearl Harbor attack occurred and eight when the war ended. Those
    pictures the Savage Duck posted the other day were taken on my brother's fifth
    birthday. I remember the day the war ended as vividly as if it were last week.

    I was too young (obviously) to fight in the war, and my father too old. But
    many of my schoolmates' fathers fought in it, and at least one was killed.
    When I was in high school, several kids who were slightly older tried to pick
    up a few extra $$ by joining the Naval Reserve. Imagine their surprise when
    the U.S. decided to bail out the Korean dictatorship, and they found
    themselves on active duty. Later when we stupidly intervened in Viet Nam, it
    pleased the Government to decide that my "critical skills" made it
    inappropriate for me to be part of it. (I knew how to program a computer, a
    relative rarity at the time.) But Martha's brother had a ROTC commission from
    college, so we sweated every day of his year in combat there.

    In the years since, we've fought more unnecessary wars, large and small, than
    I can remember. We are, quite simply, the most bellicose nation on earth. My
    fondest hope is that my grandchildren won't get sucked in, but common sense
    tells me that it's probably a forlorn wish. My only consolation is that, given
    my age and theirs, I probably won't be around to see it.

    All that aside, the worst thing about getting old is how fast time appears to
    pass. (I guess it's because each successive day is a smaller percentage of the
    time we've been alive.) There was a time when my artistic idol would have been
    Ansel Adams or Alfred Eisenstaedt or Henri Cartier-Bresson. Now it's Anna
    Robertson Moses. :^|

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 31, 2012
    #8
  9. Steve B

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 16:06:13 -0600, George Kerby <>
    wrote:
    :
    : On 12/31/12 9:40 AM, in article kbsbk5$t2k$, "Mayayana"
    : <> wrote:
    :
    : > | Here is my father's squadron, the 9th Fighter Sq. 49th Fighter Group,
    : > | in New Guinea in 1944. He is 5th from the left.
    : > | < http://db.tt/1i11XB3H >
    : >
    : > That's a nice picture. Very atmospheric.
    : >
    : > I guess we know we're getting old when we
    : > start waxing sentimental about WWII. :)
    : >
    :
    : The numbers of the participants in WWII are rapidly shrinking as the months
    : and years pass by. TRULY the "Greatest Generation"!
    :
    : Duck, tell your Dad "thanks" for his service to the Country. I bet you are a
    : proud "young" son!
    :
    : Happy New Year to one and all (with the possible exception of "Tonto" the
    : bugman - if he still is trolling in here)!!!

    You too, George, and to everyone else in the group!!

    I've wondered whether the recently arrived Kwin, the sexually preoccupied
    racist, might be the second coming of Tonto. If so, I guess he'll be back on
    his meds (or back in the hatch) soon enough.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 31, 2012
    #9
  10. Steve B

    nick c Guest

    On 12/30/2012 10:28 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > "Steve B" <> writes:
    >
    >> "Mayayana" <> wrote
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Interesting. My father was a test pilot on Guam.
    >>> He never used to talk about it (and we never
    >>> cared to ask him :) but he talks about it now.
    >>> As he approaches the end, that time stands out in
    >>> his memory. I think for many in that generation
    >>> WW2 was the most alive they ever felt.

    >>
    >> I did not have to go to Viet Nam because of a heart condition. Most of the
    >> guys I talked to said the thing that was in the forefront of their mind was
    >> staying alive for XXX more days until their departure date, and never
    >> knowing if the guy who was going to get you was going to be in uniform, or
    >> some twelve year old that just got walked away from a bike bomb with a
    >> timer.

    >
    > And in WWII, they didn't have "tours" of specific duration, so there
    > wasn't that clear date to look forward to, even.
    >


    Since no one knew how long the war would last, those who entered the
    service signed up for the duration. The duration was whatever congress
    said it was to be and (I think) in 47 (circa November) congress finally
    declared the end to the war's duration. The war ended in 45 yet
    occasional scattered fighting continued throughout many of the Pacific
    islands, diminishing until sometime in early 47. For example, in 46,
    Japanese troops would often infiltrate the perimeter of Clark Field (on
    the island of Luzon) and machine-gun American fighter aircraft as they
    were landing, then they would quickly retreat. Japanese troops were told
    Japan would never surrender and that US troop announcements about Japans
    surrender were just propaganda ploys and were to be disregarded.

    The POW camp where we housed captured Japanese troops before shipping
    them home to Japan was about 4 or 5 miles southeast of Manila. Across
    the road from the Japanese POW camp was the American stockade. There was
    another much smaller stockade nearby where we placed soldiers who went
    AWOL or were convicted of other minor military regulation infringements.
    As usual, that stockade was generally run by a Master Sergent named
    Tiny, who was in reality an Ape in uniform and liked to have pisscall's
    about 2am and then have prison barracks floors (around a prisoner's cot)
    scrubbed with old worn-out toothbrushes.


    In today's Army, mother wouldn't like that.
     
    nick c, Dec 31, 2012
    #10
  11. Steve B

    Peter Guest

    On 12/31/2012 6:31 PM, Savageduck wrote:

    <snip>
    >
    > As you can see he is doing quite well and his only recent health issue
    > has been cataract surgery.
    >
    >


    May he have a speedy recovry from that, now almost routine procedure.

    --
    PeterN
     
    Peter, Jan 1, 2013
    #11
  12. Steve B

    Peter Guest

    On 12/31/2012 7:33 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2012-12-31 16:31:45 -0800, Peter <> said:
    >
    >> On 12/31/2012 6:31 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>>
    >>> As you can see he is doing quite well and his only recent health issue
    >>> has been cataract surgery.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> May he have a speedy recovry from that, now almost routine procedure.

    >
    > Oh! that was a year or two ago, and he is very happy with the results.
    >


    that's good news.
    Well this is almost my last post for the year.
    So I wish all a happy New Year.

    Here's one guy who will and one who won't.
    <https://www.dropbox.com/s/thnjiy2j4rd7j6r/cold%20turtle%20soup.jpg>


    --
    PeterN
     
    Peter, Jan 1, 2013
    #12
  13. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:2012123111544375629-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    > On 2012-12-31 10:49:27 -0800, "Steve B" <> said:
    >
    >>
    >> "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    >> news:201212302038201669-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    >>> On 2012-12-30 19:35:01 -0800, "Steve B" <> said:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> Awesome picture. My dad was a flight engineer on a B-24M in the
    >>>>>>> Pacific
    >>>>>>> Theater. He got four bronze stars. Never ever spoke a word about it.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Steve
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> If your dad flew in that B24 in the SW Pacific, New Guinea, Rabaul,
    >>>>>> Bismark Archipelago, Borneo, Philippines, 1943-44, he might well have
    >>>>>> had my father flying escort for him.
    >>>>
    >>>> He was in the "Long Rangers". The 13th AF, USAC. 307th bomb group out
    >>>> of
    >>>> Morotai. Philipines, Borneo, Balikapapan. Many others. He never
    >>>> spoke
    >>>> of
    >>>> it. I got copies of his medals, and have his photo album, complete
    >>>> with
    >>>> his
    >>>> uniform medals and wings. Musta seen a lot.
    >>>
    >>> My father flew escort for several of the Balikpapan raids where the
    >>> bombers flew out of Morotai and the escorts off of Biak Island. Those
    >>> were
    >>> the longest round trip bomber missions and fighter escorts of the entire
    >>> war. On one of those escorts he had two confirmed kills and won a Silver
    >>> Star.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Who wrote the racial comment? Must be someone I already 86'd, as I saw
    >>>> it
    >>>> as an add on to the other posts.
    >>>>
    >>>> Steve
    >>>
    >>> That is a provocateur, quite ignorable.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Regards,
    >>>
    >>> Savageduck

    >>
    >> Morotai is not the largest piece of real estate in the world. I would
    >> bet
    >> two bucks they may have been known to each other.
    >>
    >> Steve

    >
    > Just to clarify, my father was never on Morotai, he flew from an even
    > smaller piece of real estate, Biak Island.
    >
    > ...and you are right, the various organizations were pretty much worlds
    > unto themselves. Even though many of these squadrons shared some airfields
    > they only seemed to now those in their own squadrons. In my father's case
    > with the 49th Fighter Group with its three squadrons, he was only familiar
    > with a handful of flyers from other squadrons, or the 5th AF Head quarters
    > group. Even more so after his involvement at Leyte, he was among the first
    > fighter pilots at Tacloban, the site of the landings, and was involved
    > with the fight over Ormoc Bay. He rotated out in November 1944 to return
    > for a second tour two months later, just in time for the Linguyen Gulf
    > landings, the battle for Manila, and Okinawa.
    >
    > He then flew escort for the Japanese negotiators in the "Surrender
    > Betties", and was part of the 8 plane MacArthur "Honor Guard flight" which
    > made the 9th Fighter Squadron the first tactical fighter unit to occupy a
    > Japanese air base, 5 days before the signing of the surrender on the USS
    > Missouri.
    >
    > From the official 9th FS History:
    > "Shortly after noon of the 19th August, two Betty bombers carrying the
    > Japanese peace envoys landed on Ie Shima. The planes, with their P-38
    > escort, could easily be seen from camp. The following day the news that
    > the surrender was definitely arranged for by MacArthur's headquarters in
    > Manila came through. On the 21st, Major Petrovich, Captain Howes, Lts.
    > Poston, Oglesby and Smith took off at 0730 hours to escort the Japanese
    > representatives back to Japan in their green- crossed, white Betty
    > bombers."
    > < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/Surrender_Betty-h62869.jpg >
    > A few Japanese crew happy to know they would survive the war;
    > < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/Surrender_Betty-h81964.jpg >
    >
    > and
    >
    > "On Wednesday, 29 August, twenty-five airplanes received preliminary
    > loading of C-rations, cots, blankets, and pilots' clothes. At first
    > sixteen planes were to make the trip as the honor squadron then the number
    > was upped to twenty-five, and finally down to eight. The eight oldest
    > pilots in the squadron, all veterans of the Leyte Campaign and two second
    > tour boys from Gusap, took off with a four plane additional escort at 1200
    > hours, 30 August 1945. Major Petrovich, squadron C.O., led the flight with
    > Lt. Corley flying his wing. S/Sgt. Serapin was riding piggy-back in
    > Corley's ship. Lt. Oglesby, veteran of 150 missions and 400 combat hours
    > with four Nips to his credit and then on his second tour of duty flew Red
    > Flight Element. Lt. Gribble, veteran of the Leyte scrap, flew number four.
    > Captain Howes, with over 598 combat hours and four Nips destroyed in
    > aerial combat under his belt led White Flight with Captain Clark flying
    > his wing. Lt. Poston, who returned to combat with Oglesby when stateside
    > flying proved too dull, led White Flight Element with Lt. Smith, back just
    > south of Kyushu and the eight original planes winged on thru a clear sky,
    > though thunderheads and towering cumulus hovered over the mountains to the
    > west. Three and one-half hours out, towering Fujiyama became visible
    > through the haze ahead, its top hidden in clouds, as the flat, green
    > plains of the Atsumu-Hanto peninsula passed under the left wing. The
    > flights landed at Atsugi Airstrip, southeast of Tokyo, at 1615 hours and
    > were parked by Colonel Gerald Johnson, former group commander, then
    > operations officer of the first American airstrip in Japan, in a grassy
    > field just north of the strip."
    >
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    >
    > Savageduck
    >


    A copy of this post has been saved to my Dad's military file, and will be
    forwarded to the one of the surviving veterans of that area who is
    maintaining a website. Perhaps it will fill in some of the blank spaces
    with him. He sent me some pics of my Dad, just candid photos around the
    camp, and my Dad's name was either misspelled, or "name missing" or
    "unknown" was entered. He sure enjoyed the pic I sent him with all the crew
    in front of the plane with their sheepskin leather coats on, with all the
    men's names and ranks and duties and hometowns.

    Steve
     
    Steve B, Jan 1, 2013
    #13
  14. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    "David Dyer-Bennet" <> wrote

    > And in WWII, they didn't have "tours" of specific duration, so there
    > wasn't that clear date to look forward to, even.


    My father got four bronze stars. A couple of military men explained that
    they were because he was involved in four different particular battle fronts
    in the Pacific, each separate from the other. So, I guess he dodged death
    on four separate campaigns.

    At his funeral, there was a fly-over by four WWII era planes, one a bomber.
    I am not sure of the types, as it was rather quick, and there was a lot
    going on in my mind that day.

    Steve
     
    Steve B, Jan 1, 2013
    #14
  15. Steve B

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 23:25:10 -0700, "Steve B" <> wrote:
    :
    : "David Dyer-Bennet" <> wrote
    :
    : > And in WWII, they didn't have "tours" of specific duration, so there
    : > wasn't that clear date to look forward to, even.
    :
    : My father got four bronze stars. A couple of military men explained that
    : they were because he was involved in four different particular battle fronts
    : in the Pacific, each separate from the other. So, I guess he dodged death
    : on four separate campaigns.

    Not unusual. As soon as an island was captured or a country liberated, it was
    on to the next one. It wasn't over until it was over.

    That's what people too young to remember don't understand about the atomic
    bomb. The Japanese meant it when they vowed never to surrender and to resist
    an invasion with the last man, woman, or child. The death toll, on both sides,
    in a land invasion would have been incalculable.

    But when the Japanese leadership saw their cities begin to disappear, they
    realized the futility of their position. When the first bomb fell, they
    recognized what it was, but they didn't surrender. Evidently they hoped we
    were bluffing and had made only the one bomb. But when the second bomb fell
    two days later, they surrendered immediately and unconditionally, because they
    then had no idea how many bombs we might have. The evidence suggests that in
    fact we were bluffing and had only the two bombs ready to use. But the point
    had been made. So although 200,000 lives were lost in the bombings, many more
    were probably saved.

    Sometimes when I'm packing my Japanese cameras for a photo shoot, it occurs to
    me how different the world is now from the way it was then. In at least that
    one respect, the change has been for the better.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jan 1, 2013
    #15
  16. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote

    >
    > From what you are saying your father participated in five "Asiatic-Pacific
    > Theater" campaigns represented by the medal and four bronze "Battle Star"
    > ribbon attachments.


    My ex-military friend is very knowledgeable on these matters, and he once
    described to me from information I provided him that the bronze stars were
    for the individual campaigns, such as the ones you named, and not for
    individual acts of valor.

    He had a marksman award, too. Not sure if that was for rifle, or aircraft
    machine gun. He was raised in a forested area, and deer hunted all his life
    before joining.

    He has other "stuff", one being partially burned actual copies of records
    that survived the fire at some central govt. storage facility. Those tell a
    lot, but a lot of it is abbreviations, and acronyms that are difficult to
    interpret. I really need to copy all this stuff, and send it to the man who
    is archiving all this, because some of the pictures will fill in blanks in
    other father's histories.

    Steve
     
    Steve B, Jan 1, 2013
    #16
  17. On 01-Jan-13 00:57, Steve B wrote:

    > A copy of this post has been saved to my Dad's military file, and will be
    > forwarded to the one of the surviving veterans of that area who is
    > maintaining a website. Perhaps it will fill in some of the blank spaces
    > with him. He sent me some pics of my Dad, just candid photos around the
    > camp, and my Dad's name was either misspelled, or "name missing" or
    > "unknown" was entered. He sure enjoyed the pic I sent him with all the crew
    > in front of the plane with their sheepskin leather coats on, with all the
    > men's names and ranks and duties and hometowns.


    Nobody gives a FLYING ****.
     
    Kwincay Ercolinowitz, Jan 2, 2013
    #17
  18. Steve B

    Peter Guest

    On 1/1/2013 11:12 AM, Robert Coe wrote:
    > On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 23:25:10 -0700, "Steve B" <> wrote:
    > :
    > : "David Dyer-Bennet" <> wrote
    > :
    > : > And in WWII, they didn't have "tours" of specific duration, so there
    > : > wasn't that clear date to look forward to, even.
    > :
    > : My father got four bronze stars. A couple of military men explained that
    > : they were because he was involved in four different particular battle fronts
    > : in the Pacific, each separate from the other. So, I guess he dodged death
    > : on four separate campaigns.
    >
    > Not unusual. As soon as an island was captured or a country liberated, it was
    > on to the next one. It wasn't over until it was over.
    >
    > That's what people too young to remember don't understand about the atomic
    > bomb. The Japanese meant it when they vowed never to surrender and to resist
    > an invasion with the last man, woman, or child. The death toll, on both sides,
    > in a land invasion would have been incalculable.
    >
    > But when the Japanese leadership saw their cities begin to disappear, they
    > realized the futility of their position. When the first bomb fell, they
    > recognized what it was, but they didn't surrender. Evidently they hoped we
    > were bluffing and had made only the one bomb. But when the second bomb fell
    > two days later, they surrendered immediately and unconditionally, because they
    > then had no idea how many bombs we might have. The evidence suggests that in
    > fact we were bluffing and had only the two bombs ready to use. But the point
    > had been made. So although 200,000 lives were lost in the bombings, many more
    > were probably saved.
    >
    > Sometimes when I'm packing my Japanese cameras for a photo shoot, it occurs to
    > me how different the world is now from the way it was then. In at least that
    > one respect, the change has been for the better.
    >


    It was not quit that simple.
    From what I understand, prior to dropping the first, one major issue
    was the treatment of the Emperor. Had we agreed to leave him in power,
    there probably would not have been a need to drop the bomb. Even after
    the second was dropped, there was a substantial movement to oppose the
    Emperor on the surrender. In fact, it was only after we gave a back door
    assurance that the Emperor would not be tried, that the surrender became
    possible.
    Another element in our thinking wa th growing perceived threat of the
    Soviet Union. We wanted to let Stalin know that we were ready, willing
    and able to use nuclear weapons. Many Japanese civilians paid the
    ultimate price.


    --
    PeterN
     
    Peter, Jan 2, 2013
    #18
  19. On 02-Jan-13 10:49, Peter wrote:
    > It was not quit that simple.
    > From what I understand, prior to dropping the first, one major issue
    > was the treatment of the Emperor. Had we agreed to leave him in power,
    > there probably would not have been a need to drop the bomb. Even after
    > the second was dropped, there was a substantial movement to oppose the
    > Emperor on the surrender. In fact, it was only after we gave a back door
    > assurance that the Emperor would not be tried, that the surrender became
    > possible.
    > Another element in our thinking wa th growing perceived threat of the
    > Soviet Union. We wanted to let Stalin know that we were ready, willing
    > and able to use nuclear weapons. Many Japanese civilians paid the
    > ultimate price.


    And this relates to photography in what way?

    Who cares about the nips?

    We nuked 'em and bought their fucking cars.

    And we got Yoko Ono with her big nipples and hairy snatch.
     
    Kwincay Ercolinowitz, Jan 2, 2013
    #19
  20. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    "David Dyer-Bennet" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Steve B" <> writes:
    >
    >> "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote
    >>
    >>>
    >>> From what you are saying your father participated in five
    >>> "Asiatic-Pacific
    >>> Theater" campaigns represented by the medal and four bronze "Battle
    >>> Star"
    >>> ribbon attachments.

    >>
    >> My ex-military friend is very knowledgeable on these matters, and he once
    >> described to me from information I provided him that the bronze stars
    >> were
    >> for the individual campaigns, such as the ones you named, and not for
    >> individual acts of valor.

    >
    > Is it possible we're confusing the "Bronze Star Medal" with the "Bronze
    > Battle Star"? The "Bronze Battle Star" is a little star that is placed
    > on the campaign ribbon to indicate you participated in a battle in that
    > campaign, and that sounds like what's being described.
    >
    > <http://www.398th.org/Awards/BronzeStar/BronzeStar_BronzeBattleStar.html>
    >
    > The "Bronze Star Medal" is an individual award "for heroic or meritorius
    > achievement", and doesn't sound so much like what is being described
    > here.
    > --
    > Googleproofaddress(account:dd-b provider:dd-b domain:net)
    > Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    > Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    > Dragaera: http://dragaera.info


    Yes, these are small stars on the ribbons, not large silver dollar sized
    stars.

    HTH

    Steve
     
    Steve B, Jan 3, 2013
    #20
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