Indoor Lighting

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Tiny Lund, Jun 5, 2004.

  1. Tiny Lund

    Tiny Lund Guest

    Hello all,
    Perhaps someone can help me with indoor lighting? I have a Sony DSC-52
    and have real problems getting a good indoor photo. I have tested nearly
    every imaginable setting and still the picture is too dark or too bright. I
    shoot clothing for resale and really have trouble with black clothing. Any
    tips on what lighting I should use? Or settings? Thank you.
     
    Tiny Lund, Jun 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. Tiny Lund wrote:
    > Hello all,
    > Perhaps someone can help me with indoor lighting? I have a Sony
    > DSC-52 and have real problems getting a good indoor photo. I have
    > tested nearly every imaginable setting and still the picture is too
    > dark or too bright. I shoot clothing for resale and really have
    > trouble with black clothing. Any tips on what lighting I should use?
    > Or settings? Thank you.


    Indoor lighting is difficult. Find a good book on lighting and a good
    light meter. Then figure out what means good lighting for your needs and
    use the meter (spot meter preferred) to get it. A read on the "Zone" system
    may be in order for more in-depth lighting theory and practice in particular
    it will help you understand the black clothing issue.

    This is not a "digital" issue, it is a general photographic issue.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
     
    Joseph Meehan, Jun 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. Tiny Lund

    f1 studios Guest

    "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message
    news:hKkwc.27642$...
    > Tiny Lund wrote:
    > > Hello all,
    > > Perhaps someone can help me with indoor lighting? I have a Sony
    > > DSC-52 and have real problems getting a good indoor photo. I have
    > > tested nearly every imaginable setting and still the picture is too
    > > dark or too bright. I shoot clothing for resale and really have
    > > trouble with black clothing. Any tips on what lighting I should use?
    > > Or settings? Thank you.

    >
    > Indoor lighting is difficult. Find a good book on lighting and a good
    > light meter. Then figure out what means good lighting for your needs and
    > use the meter (spot meter preferred) to get it. A read on the "Zone"

    system
    > may be in order for more in-depth lighting theory and practice in

    particular
    > it will help you understand the black clothing issue.
    >
    > This is not a "digital" issue, it is a general photographic issue.
    >
    > --
    > Joseph E. Meehan
    >
    > 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    >
    >

    Are you talking about serious indoor lighting as in a studio or hanging the
    clothes on the back of the bedroom door and using the in-built camera flash
    like most e-bay photos?
    I don't have any problems lighting models wearing black clothing in my
    studio - in fact the colour of the clothing (or the model) doesn't make any
    difference. Correct exposure is correct exposure whatever the subject.
    If you are in the UK come to my studio and if you don't get decent results I
    won't charge you.

    Cheers

    Mike
    http://www.f1studios/co/uk

    >
     
    f1 studios, Jun 5, 2004
    #3
  4. Tiny Lund

    Tiny Lund Guest

    He He Mike! I am in Pennsylvania and yes I am shooting for Ebay. In fact, I
    am hanging the clothes on a hook as well. I have a walk-in closet I may try
    to make a studio. Now I suppose it is time to buy some lighting books and
    spend money on some serious lights.
    "f1 studios" <1studios.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:c9t2e2$d81$...
    >
    > "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message
    > news:hKkwc.27642$...
    > > Tiny Lund wrote:
    > > > Hello all,
    > > > Perhaps someone can help me with indoor lighting? I have a Sony
    > > > DSC-52 and have real problems getting a good indoor photo. I have
    > > > tested nearly every imaginable setting and still the picture is too
    > > > dark or too bright. I shoot clothing for resale and really have
    > > > trouble with black clothing. Any tips on what lighting I should use?
    > > > Or settings? Thank you.

    > >
    > > Indoor lighting is difficult. Find a good book on lighting and a

    good
    > > light meter. Then figure out what means good lighting for your needs

    and
    > > use the meter (spot meter preferred) to get it. A read on the "Zone"

    > system
    > > may be in order for more in-depth lighting theory and practice in

    > particular
    > > it will help you understand the black clothing issue.
    > >
    > > This is not a "digital" issue, it is a general photographic issue.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Joseph E. Meehan
    > >
    > > 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    > >
    > >

    > Are you talking about serious indoor lighting as in a studio or hanging

    the
    > clothes on the back of the bedroom door and using the in-built camera

    flash
    > like most e-bay photos?
    > I don't have any problems lighting models wearing black clothing in my
    > studio - in fact the colour of the clothing (or the model) doesn't make

    any
    > difference. Correct exposure is correct exposure whatever the subject.
    > If you are in the UK come to my studio and if you don't get decent results

    I
    > won't charge you.
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Mike
    > http://www.f1studios/co/uk
    >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Tiny Lund, Jun 5, 2004
    #4
  5. Tiny Lund wrote:
    > He He Mike! I am in Pennsylvania and yes I am shooting for Ebay. In
    > fact, I am hanging the clothes on a hook as well. I have a walk-in
    > closet I may try to make a studio. Now I suppose it is time to buy
    > some lighting books and spend money on some serious lights.
    > "f1 studios" <1studios.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:c9t2e2$d81$...


    Read the books first. You may not need to buy much if anything. Good
    lighting need not be expensive. Convenient, vestal, reliable, good lighting
    is expensive however.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
     
    Joseph Meehan, Jun 5, 2004
    #5
  6. Tiny Lund

    Tom Monego Guest

    In article <>, says...
    >
    >He He Mike! I am in Pennsylvania and yes I am shooting for Ebay. In fact, I
    >am hanging the clothes on a hook as well. I have a walk-in closet I may try
    >to make a studio. Now I suppose it is time to buy some lighting books and
    >spend money on some serious lights.
    >"f1 studios" <1studios.co.uk> wrote in message
    >news:c9t2e2$d81$...



    If this is the case then you really don't have enough light and the light you
    do have is too directional (small on camers flash). A simple solution would be
    find a flash your camera can use that you can bounce. A flash that can be
    rotate vertically and use a Lumiquest bounce card. I know there are ways of
    doing this with tape and paper, but the $20 spent on the Lumiquest simplifies
    things. If you want to get into studio lighting, a simple Lowell Totalight kit
    is a good investment, bounce the lights into the umbrellas, again to diffuse
    the lighting. I deally to remove glare and minimize shadows your light source
    should be bigger than your subject. I've shot motorcycles with two six foot
    lightforms taped together and 4 Lowell Totalights.

    Tom
     
    Tom Monego, Jun 6, 2004
    #6
  7. Tiny Lund

    f1 studios Guest

    OK - why not try using natural light through a window - cover the window
    with some net curtain to diffuse the light and don't use a window with
    direct sunlight.

    Cheers

    Mike
    http://www.f1studios.co.uk

    "Tiny Lund" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > He He Mike! I am in Pennsylvania and yes I am shooting for Ebay. In fact,

    I
    > am hanging the clothes on a hook as well. I have a walk-in closet I may

    try
    > to make a studio. Now I suppose it is time to buy some lighting books and
    > spend money on some serious lights.
    > "f1 studios" <1studios.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:c9t2e2$d81$...
    > >
    > > "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message
    > > news:hKkwc.27642$...
    > > > Tiny Lund wrote:
    > > > > Hello all,
    > > > > Perhaps someone can help me with indoor lighting? I have a

    Sony
    > > > > DSC-52 and have real problems getting a good indoor photo. I have
    > > > > tested nearly every imaginable setting and still the picture is too
    > > > > dark or too bright. I shoot clothing for resale and really have
    > > > > trouble with black clothing. Any tips on what lighting I should use?
    > > > > Or settings? Thank you.
    > > >
    > > > Indoor lighting is difficult. Find a good book on lighting and a

    > good
    > > > light meter. Then figure out what means good lighting for your needs

    > and
    > > > use the meter (spot meter preferred) to get it. A read on the "Zone"

    > > system
    > > > may be in order for more in-depth lighting theory and practice in

    > > particular
    > > > it will help you understand the black clothing issue.
    > > >
    > > > This is not a "digital" issue, it is a general photographic issue.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Joseph E. Meehan
    > > >
    > > > 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    > > >
    > > >

    > > Are you talking about serious indoor lighting as in a studio or hanging

    > the
    > > clothes on the back of the bedroom door and using the in-built camera

    > flash
    > > like most e-bay photos?
    > > I don't have any problems lighting models wearing black clothing in my
    > > studio - in fact the colour of the clothing (or the model) doesn't make

    > any
    > > difference. Correct exposure is correct exposure whatever the subject.
    > > If you are in the UK come to my studio and if you don't get decent

    results
    > I
    > > won't charge you.
    > >
    > > Cheers
    > >
    > > Mike
    > > http://www.f1studios/co/uk
    > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    f1 studios, Jun 7, 2004
    #7
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