Indoor Flash with high ceiling

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by PeterH, Jun 1, 2004.

  1. PeterH

    PeterH Guest

    I have a Canon 300D (Rebel) with Canon 550EX flash.

    I recently had to photograph indoors and had no ceiling to bounce off.

    I tried flash exposure compensation of -1/3 to -1 2/3 but got varied
    results.

    I set the camera to P mode (1/60 and f5.6) - wasn't confident enough
    to use manual indoors. Is there a trick to using manual without having
    to mount on a tripod.

    Because of the high ceiling and brick walls I had to aim the flash
    directly at the subject(s).

    Is there a good way to handle this situation to get good natural
    photos eg add a small bounce/reflector to the flash. It would be good
    to have a soft light available from the flash (even when aimed
    directly at the subject) without having to find a low enough ceiling
    to bounce off.

    I want to be able to hand-hold the camera and not have to use a tripod
    for long exposures.

    Regards

    Peter
     
    PeterH, Jun 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. PeterH

    Ed E. Guest

    Ed E., Jun 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. Ed E. wrote:
    > There are a number of small soft-box flash attachments you can use. If
    > you're worried about shadows while shooting in a portrait orientation, check
    > into a flash bracket and hot-shoe extension cable.
    >
    > Here are a couple of links that you might find helpful (although they'll
    > probably wrap):
    > http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=32428&is=REG
    > http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=52752&is=REG
    >


    The 550 EX comes with a built in soft-box emulator. Just point the flash
    straight up, and lift the plastic cover up to 90 degrees.... I prefer
    manual in such situations, and then shooting the folks from the same
    distance once I get the settings with flash right.

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 1, 2004
    #3
  4. PeterH

    PeterH Guest

    Yes I forgot to try the plastic diffuser the other night.

    Will it give sufficient soft light to still give good exposure - I
    imagine the flash will just expose for long enough to get the right
    amount of light on the subject??

    I have heard of other attachments such as the Lumiqeust products and
    the Omnibounce (?). Or do I have enough with the 550EX (with the
    diffuser extension) to not require any of these extra attachments?

    thanks for you reply

    PeterH

    John McWilliams <> wrote in message news:<cG0vc.26055$3x.11748@attbi_s54>...
    > Ed E. wrote:
    > > There are a number of small soft-box flash attachments you can use. If
    > > you're worried about shadows while shooting in a portrait orientation, check
    > > into a flash bracket and hot-shoe extension cable.
    > >
    > > Here are a couple of links that you might find helpful (although they'll
    > > probably wrap):
    > > http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=32428&is=REG
    > > http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=52752&is=REG
    > >

    >
    > The 550 EX comes with a built in soft-box emulator. Just point the flash
    > straight up, and lift the plastic cover up to 90 degrees.... I prefer
    > manual in such situations, and then shooting the folks from the same
    > distance once I get the settings with flash right.
     
    PeterH, Jun 2, 2004
    #4
  5. PeterH

    Guest

    In message <>,
    (PeterH) wrote:

    >I have a Canon 300D (Rebel) with Canon 550EX flash.
    >
    >I recently had to photograph indoors and had no ceiling to bounce off.


    Anything white or white metallic (unpolished) to the side of you or
    behind you could be used.

    You could point the flash up and hold a white card at a slight angle to
    the upright head so that it is illuminated by the flash.

    >I tried flash exposure compensation of -1/3 to -1 2/3 but got varied
    >results.


    That would put the burden of exposure on the ambient light, which can
    ruin the exposure if it is too long.

    >I set the camera to P mode (1/60 and f5.6) - wasn't confident enough
    >to use manual indoors. Is there a trick to using manual without having
    >to mount on a tripod.


    Manual is easy with the 550EX. Set the flash to TTL, and set aperture
    for the depth of field and optics you want, but remembering that the
    smaller the aperture (higher f-stop), the higher the possibility that
    full flash discharge will not be enough.

    >Because of the high ceiling and brick walls I had to aim the flash
    >directly at the subject(s).


    >Is there a good way to handle this situation to get good natural
    >photos eg add a small bounce/reflector to the flash. It would be good
    >to have a soft light available from the flash (even when aimed
    >directly at the subject) without having to find a low enough ceiling
    >to bounce off.


    I have a Lumiquest kit that mounts on the flash as it is pointed to the
    ceiling, and can diffuse the light so that it is coming from a source
    about 4x the size of the head with a white diffusor, or a silver or gold
    crumpled reflector.

    >I want to be able to hand-hold the camera and not have to use a tripod
    >for long exposures.


    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    , Jun 2, 2004
    #5
  6. PeterH

    Guest

    In message <>, I,
    wrote:

    >Manual is easy with the 550EX. Set the flash to TTL, and set aperture
    >for the depth of field and optics you want, but remembering that the
    >smaller the aperture (higher f-stop), the higher the possibility that
    >full flash discharge will not be enough.


    I forgot to mention the shutter speed. If you want almost all flash
    (not a bad thing if you can get it to diffuse well), use 1/200. If you
    want to get more ambient light, use a longer shutter speed up to the
    limits of hand-holding the lens.

    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    , Jun 2, 2004
    #6
  7. (PeterH) wrote in message news:<>...
    > I have a Canon 300D (Rebel) with Canon 550EX flash.
    >
    > I recently had to photograph indoors and had no ceiling to bounce off.


    Tough situation. All the solutions mentioned are options, in addition
    consider an omnibounce angled at 45 or so, you'll get nicely diffused
    light as well as bounced light. In an evaluative e-ttl mode, this
    will actually increase flash output as well, somewhat
    counter-intuitively.

    Another great option is a stand-alone flash or two or three
    functioning in a slave mode. You'll need another one for the camera,
    since the 300D's built-in can't be used to trigger slaves without
    dominating the scene and ruining the off-board flash benefit.

    A small fleet of Sigma DG Supers are ideal for this, as they are
    exceptionally well made, bargain priced extrememly powerful light
    guns, provide full 3D swivel heads, come with their own stands and
    tripod mounts, provide radio-linked TTL between all units, and have
    light triggered slave modes too.

    Lastly, a floor or wall bounce could provide acceptable-to-fabulous
    results, depending on the scene.
     
    Georgette Preddy, Jun 2, 2004
    #7
  8. PeterH

    zeitgeist Guest

    try bouncing off a sidewall, I think it looks better anyway.


    >
    > I recently had to photograph indoors and had no ceiling to bounce off.
    >
    > I tried flash exposure compensation of -1/3 to -1 2/3 but got varied
    > results.
    >
    > I set the camera to P mode (1/60 and f5.6) - wasn't confident enough
    > to use manual indoors. Is there a trick to using manual without having
    > to mount on a tripod.
    >
    > Because of the high ceiling and brick walls I had to aim the flash
    > directly at the subject(s).
    >
    > Is there a good way to handle this situation to get good natural
    > photos eg add a small bounce/reflector to the flash. It would be good
    > to have a soft light available from the flash (even when aimed
    > directly at the subject) without having to find a low enough ceiling
    > to bounce off.
    >
    > I want to be able to hand-hold the camera and not have to use a tripod
    > for long exposures.
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Peter
     
    zeitgeist, Jun 3, 2004
    #8
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