Incomming connection WinXP (pro) - do I need a proxy?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Andy, Feb 21, 2004.

  1. Andy

    Andy Guest

    I have a small LAN set up at home with a cable connection to the net. I want
    to set up my one of the client computers so that I can dial in from my lap
    top when I visit my dear old mum, who lives in the country. I don't want a
    VPN for file sharing (maybee later) just send/recieve mail and browsing.
    I set up something similar a few years ago at work on an NT machine and I
    remember I had to install some proxy software to handle the NAT (I used a
    freeware program called analogx). Do I need to do this with XP? Ive set up
    the incomming connection via the wizard in "My Network Places", assigned an
    address range for the DHCP server and checked the user/s I wish to grant
    access to. Anything else to do? I just seem to recall it was MUCH more of a
    struggle on the NT box.

    Oh - BTW my lap top runs XP pro (if it matters).
     
    Andy, Feb 21, 2004
    #1
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  2. Andy

    DataSpider Guest

    "Andy" <> wrote in message
    news:4036e34e$0$19704$...
    > I have a small LAN set up at home with a cable connection to the net. I

    want
    > to set up my one of the client computers so that I can dial in from my lap
    > top when I visit my dear old mum, who lives in the country. I don't want a
    > VPN for file sharing (maybee later) just send/recieve mail and browsing.
    > I set up something similar a few years ago at work on an NT machine and I
    > remember I had to install some proxy software to handle the NAT (I used a
    > freeware program called analogx). Do I need to do this with XP? Ive set up
    > the incomming connection via the wizard in "My Network Places", assigned

    an
    > address range for the DHCP server and checked the user/s I wish to grant
    > access to. Anything else to do? I just seem to recall it was MUCH more of

    a
    > struggle on the NT box.
    >
    > Oh - BTW my lap top runs XP pro (if it matters).
    >


    Dial in= RAS.
     
    DataSpider, Feb 21, 2004
    #2
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  3. Andy

    Spider Guest

    Andy wrote:

    > I have a small LAN set up at home with a cable connection to the net. I want
    > to set up my one of the client computers so that I can dial in from my lap
    > top when I visit my dear old mum, who lives in the country. I don't want a
    > VPN for file sharing (maybee later) just send/recieve mail and browsing.
    > I set up something similar a few years ago at work on an NT machine and I
    > remember I had to install some proxy software to handle the NAT (I used a
    > freeware program called analogx). Do I need to do this with XP? Ive set up
    > the incomming connection via the wizard in "My Network Places", assigned an
    > address range for the DHCP server and checked the user/s I wish to grant
    > access to. Anything else to do? I just seem to recall it was MUCH more of a
    > struggle on the NT box.
    >
    > Oh - BTW my lap top runs XP pro (if it matters).
    >
    >

    Andy,
    I don't know what router you use. I can tell you, that I use a linksys
    and the way I have it setup is to specify IP's on my local network
    instead of using DHCP. This allows me to forward ports to a specific PC
    and insures the address will not change. I then forward the port for
    remote desktop to my PC. However, I do think this would be painful on a
    dial up connection. You could also setup a RAS connection as someone
    else has suggested, but the problem with that is you would need a phone
    line hooked up at home on your PC ready to receive calls and dial
    directly to the computer. Long distance rates would probably apply if
    you are traveling. Using the port forwarding I suggested will allow you
    to establish a local internet connection and then use remote desktop to
    connect to your PC via the Internet. One note though, without VPN, be
    sure you use a "strong" password to protect this connection.

    --

    Spider
    http://web.tampabay.rr.com/spider1
     
    Spider, Feb 21, 2004
    #3
  4. Andy

    Dan Shea Guest

    On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 15:49:31 +1100, "Andy" <> wrote:

    >I have a small LAN set up at home with a cable connection to the net. I want
    >to set up my one of the client computers so that I can dial in from my lap
    >top when I visit my dear old mum, who lives in the country. I don't want a
    >VPN for file sharing (maybee later) just send/recieve mail and browsing.


    I don't like to tell people that what they want to do is not a good
    thing, but... ;-) You want to dial into the modem on your home
    computer and access the internet through that? If you don't want
    access to the files that are on your home network, why do you want an
    incoming connection to your LAN? You do realize there are other much
    better ways of accomplishing e-mail and web browsing, don't you?

    Mum's PC <-> Home PC <-> Router <-> Internet

    is bizarre and inelegant.

    Mum's PC <-> Internet

    is much better. If possible, just get a cheap dialup account while
    you're at your mum's.

    >I set up something similar a few years ago at work on an NT machine and I
    >remember I had to install some proxy software to handle the NAT (I used a
    >freeware program called analogx). Do I need to do this with XP? Ive set up
    >the incomming connection via the wizard in "My Network Places", assigned an
    >address range for the DHCP server and checked the user/s I wish to grant
    >access to. Anything else to do? I just seem to recall it was MUCH more of a
    >struggle on the NT box.


    If you're set on dialing into your home XP box and accessing the
    internet through that, you'll also need to set up something on the XP
    box to route or proxy the network traffic from your Mum's PC to the
    router. While your Mum's PC will receive an IP address when you dial
    in, it won't be on your LAN. It's only connected to the XP box. What
    you've got so far will be two separate networks: 1) Mum's PC <-> Home
    PC, and Home PC <-> Network. So yes, you DO need to set up something
    to NAT or proxy the traffic to the router.

    I believe if you install Internet Connection Sharing on the XP box
    that you're dialing into, that will have the desired effect. So you
    dial into the box, get an IP address from the box, and traffic from
    your Mum's PC is directed to the router via ICS. Other proxy software
    like WinGate would also do the trick.

    I'm entirely certain, but I would suggest that you do NOT want the IP
    addresses assigned to the incoming connection to be on the same subnet
    as your home network. If you ask the XP box to route/proxy traffic
    that it thinks is on the same subnet as the LAN, it might get
    confused. So if your LAN is set up as 192.168.0.x, subnet
    255.255.255.0, set the IPs assigned to the incoming connection to
    192.168.1.x, subnet 255.255.255.0.

    Cheers,
    dan
     
    Dan Shea, Feb 21, 2004
    #4
  5. "Andy" <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:4036e34e$0$19704$...
    > I have a small LAN set up at home with a cable connection to the net. I

    want
    > to set up my one of the client computers so that I can dial in from my lap
    > top when I visit my dear old mum, who lives in the country. I don't want a
    > VPN for file sharing (maybee later) just send/recieve mail and browsing.
    > I set up something similar a few years ago at work on an NT machine and I
    > remember I had to install some proxy software to handle the NAT (I used a
    > freeware program called analogx). Do I need to do this with XP? Ive set up
    > the incomming connection via the wizard in "My Network Places", assigned

    an
    > address range for the DHCP server and checked the user/s I wish to grant
    > access to. Anything else to do? I just seem to recall it was MUCH more of

    a
    > struggle on the NT box.
    >
    > Oh - BTW my lap top runs XP pro (if it matters).
    >
    >
     
    Misa Mirkovic, Feb 21, 2004
    #5
  6. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "Dan Shea" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 15:49:31 +1100, "Andy" <> wrote:
    >
    > >I have a small LAN set up at home with a cable connection to the net. I

    want
    > >to set up my one of the client computers so that I can dial in from my

    lap
    > >top when I visit my dear old mum, who lives in the country. I don't want

    a
    > >VPN for file sharing (maybee later) just send/recieve mail and browsing.

    >
    > I don't like to tell people that what they want to do is not a good
    > thing, but... ;-) You want to dial into the modem on your home
    > computer and access the internet through that? If you don't want
    > access to the files that are on your home network, why do you want an
    > incoming connection to your LAN? You do realize there are other much
    > better ways of accomplishing e-mail and web browsing, don't you?
    >
    > Mum's PC <-> Home PC <-> Router <-> Internet
    >
    > is bizarre and inelegant.
    >
    > Mum's PC <-> Internet
    >
    > is much better. If possible, just get a cheap dialup account while
    > you're at your mum's.


    Inelegant - agreed, but should do the job I need it to. My mum dosen't have
    a PC (thank heavens - she's not terribly good with technical things) I want
    to dial from my lap top. Just dail in for 5 or 10 min's, check the mail,
    maybee check on a few web sites - that sort of thing.


    >
    > >I set up something similar a few years ago at work on an NT machine and I
    > >remember I had to install some proxy software to handle the NAT (I used a
    > >freeware program called analogx). Do I need to do this with XP? Ive set

    up
    > >the incomming connection via the wizard in "My Network Places", assigned

    an
    > >address range for the DHCP server and checked the user/s I wish to grant
    > >access to. Anything else to do? I just seem to recall it was MUCH more of

    a
    > >struggle on the NT box.

    >
    > If you're set on dialing into your home XP box and accessing the
    > internet through that, you'll also need to set up something on the XP
    > box to route or proxy the network traffic from your Mum's PC to the
    > router. While your Mum's PC will receive an IP address when you dial
    > in, it won't be on your LAN. It's only connected to the XP box. What
    > you've got so far will be two separate networks: 1) Mum's PC <-> Home
    > PC, and Home PC <-> Network. So yes, you DO need to set up something
    > to NAT or proxy the traffic to the router.
    >
    > I believe if you install Internet Connection Sharing on the XP box
    > that you're dialing into, that will have the desired effect. So you
    > dial into the box, get an IP address from the box, and traffic from
    > your Mum's PC is directed to the router via ICS. Other proxy software
    > like WinGate would also do the trick.


    WinGate is way overkill (too expensive). ICS will work, I believe, but how
    do I configure it? Ordinarily I wold open "Netwok Connections" folder go to
    properties of the connection I want to share, and under "advanced" chek
    something like "Allow other network users to connect through this computer's
    Internet connection". But in this case I don't have option (the check box
    isn't there).

    >
    > I'm entirely certain, but I would suggest that you do NOT want the IP
    > addresses assigned to the incoming connection to be on the same subnet
    > as your home network. If you ask the XP box to route/proxy traffic
    > that it thinks is on the same subnet as the LAN, it might get
    > confused. So if your LAN is set up as 192.168.0.x, subnet
    > 255.255.255.0, set the IPs assigned to the incoming connection to
    > 192.168.1.x, subnet 255.255.255.0.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > dan
    >


    No need to subnet. Home network is 192.168.10.x. I have assigned address
    range 192.168.20.2 - 192.168.20.3 (ie 2 possible IP's) to the DHCP server on
    the "Incomming Connection"
     
    Andy, Feb 21, 2004
    #6
  7. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "Spider" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Andy wrote:
    >
    > > I have a small LAN set up at home with a cable connection to the net. I

    want
    > > to set up my one of the client computers so that I can dial in from my

    lap
    > > top when I visit my dear old mum, who lives in the country. I don't want

    a
    > > VPN for file sharing (maybee later) just send/recieve mail and browsing.
    > > I set up something similar a few years ago at work on an NT machine and

    I
    > > remember I had to install some proxy software to handle the NAT (I used

    a
    > > freeware program called analogx). Do I need to do this with XP? Ive set

    up
    > > the incomming connection via the wizard in "My Network Places", assigned

    an
    > > address range for the DHCP server and checked the user/s I wish to grant
    > > access to. Anything else to do? I just seem to recall it was MUCH more

    of a
    > > struggle on the NT box.
    > >
    > > Oh - BTW my lap top runs XP pro (if it matters).
    > >
    > >

    > Andy,
    > I don't know what router you use. I can tell you, that I use a linksys
    > and the way I have it setup is to specify IP's on my local network
    > instead of using DHCP. This allows me to forward ports to a specific PC
    > and insures the address will not change. I then forward the port for
    > remote desktop to my PC. However, I do think this would be painful on a
    > dial up connection. You could also setup a RAS connection as someone
    > else has suggested,


    Yes - that is what I need, RAS connection. I can tell it is running, as a
    service on my (home) PC but can't figure out how to configure it.

    > but the problem with that is you would need a phone
    > line hooked up at home on your PC ready to receive calls and dial
    > directly to the computer.


    I have a fax line I don't use on the w'end so I just connect the modem to
    that.

    > Long distance rates would probably apply if
    > you are traveling.


    Not a problem, it will only be for short periods, and off peak rates apply
    on week ends.

    >Using the port forwarding I suggested will allow you
    > to establish a local internet connection and then use remote desktop to
    > connect to your PC via the Internet.



    > One note though, without VPN, be
    > sure you use a "strong" password to protect this connection.


    Of course :)

    >
    > --
    >
    > Spider
    > http://web.tampabay.rr.com/spider1
     
    Andy, Feb 21, 2004
    #7
  8. Andy

    Dan Shea Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 09:40:43 +1100, "Andy" <> wrote:

    <snip>
    >If possible, just get a cheap dialup account while
    >> you're at your mum's.

    >
    >Inelegant - agreed, but should do the job I need it to. My mum dosen't have
    >a PC (thank heavens - she's not terribly good with technical things) I want
    >to dial from my lap top. Just dail in for 5 or 10 min's, check the mail,
    >maybee check on a few web sites - that sort of thing.


    OK, so not your mum's computer - your laptop. Can you get a cheap
    dialup account for your laptop while at your mum's?

    >> If you're set on dialing into your home XP box and accessing the
    >> internet through that, you'll also need to set up something on the XP
    >> box to route or proxy the network traffic from your Mum's PC to the
    >> router. While your Mum's PC will receive an IP address when you dial
    >> in, it won't be on your LAN. It's only connected to the XP box. What
    >> you've got so far will be two separate networks: 1) Mum's PC <-> Home
    >> PC, and Home PC <-> Network. So yes, you DO need to set up something
    >> to NAT or proxy the traffic to the router.
    >>
    >> I believe if you install Internet Connection Sharing on the XP box
    >> that you're dialing into, that will have the desired effect. So you
    >> dial into the box, get an IP address from the box, and traffic from
    >> your Mum's PC is directed to the router via ICS. Other proxy software
    >> like WinGate would also do the trick.

    >
    >WinGate is way overkill (too expensive). ICS will work, I believe, but how
    >do I configure it? Ordinarily I wold open "Netwok Connections" folder go to
    >properties of the connection I want to share, and under "advanced" chek
    >something like "Allow other network users to connect through this computer's
    >Internet connection". But in this case I don't have option (the check box
    >isn't there).


    Dunno. I try to use ICS as little as possible. :) I would bet that
    you can only use ICS with LAN connections - you might not be able to
    share it through the modem. If that's the case, ICS ain't gonna do it
    and you'll need to look at some other software.

    Cheers,
    dan
     
    Dan Shea, Feb 22, 2004
    #8
  9. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "Dan Shea" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 09:40:43 +1100, "Andy" <> wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    > >If possible, just get a cheap dialup account while
    > >> you're at your mum's.

    > >
    > >Inelegant - agreed, but should do the job I need it to. My mum dosen't

    have
    > >a PC (thank heavens - she's not terribly good with technical things) I

    want
    > >to dial from my lap top. Just dail in for 5 or 10 min's, check the mail,
    > >maybee check on a few web sites - that sort of thing.

    >
    > OK, so not your mum's computer - your laptop. Can you get a cheap
    > dialup account for your laptop while at your mum's?


    I haven't actually checked - but I'd kinda doubt such a thing is available
    where she is, and I think one or two ten min calls every couple of weeks
    would be much cheaper.
    >
    > >> If you're set on dialing into your home XP box and accessing the
    > >> internet through that, you'll also need to set up something on the XP
    > >> box to route or proxy the network traffic from your Mum's PC to the
    > >> router. While your Mum's PC will receive an IP address when you dial
    > >> in, it won't be on your LAN. It's only connected to the XP box. What
    > >> you've got so far will be two separate networks: 1) Mum's PC <-> Home
    > >> PC, and Home PC <-> Network. So yes, you DO need to set up something
    > >> to NAT or proxy the traffic to the router.
    > >>
    > >> I believe if you install Internet Connection Sharing on the XP box
    > >> that you're dialing into, that will have the desired effect. So you
    > >> dial into the box, get an IP address from the box, and traffic from
    > >> your Mum's PC is directed to the router via ICS. Other proxy software
    > >> like WinGate would also do the trick.

    > >
    > >WinGate is way overkill (too expensive). ICS will work, I believe, but

    how
    > >do I configure it? Ordinarily I wold open "Netwok Connections" folder go

    to
    > >properties of the connection I want to share, and under "advanced" chek
    > >something like "Allow other network users to connect through this

    computer's
    > >Internet connection". But in this case I don't have option (the check

    box
    > >isn't there).

    >
    > Dunno. I try to use ICS as little as possible. :) I would bet that
    > you can only use ICS with LAN connections - you might not be able to
    > share it through the modem. If that's the case, ICS ain't gonna do it
    > and you'll need to look at some other software.


    Just done a little reading at MS knowlage baseand found out :

    IMPORTANT: When you enable ICS, the network adapter that is connected to the
    home or small-office network receives a new static IP address of
    192.168.0.1, with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. Existing TCP/IP
    connections on the network may be lost and must be reestablished.


    I think this means winders will always assume you want web access over the
    dial up connection which is then shared over the LAN, not the other way
    around which is what I want :(



    >
    > Cheers,
    > dan
    >
     
    Andy, Feb 22, 2004
    #9
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