Inactivation of Windows Vista 64 bit

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by =?Utf-8?B?RXJpYyBHYXJyZXR0?=, Oct 9, 2007.

  1. The very slightest of hardware changes has resulted in inactivation of
    Windows Vista Ultimate 64 bit edition several times. Updating system BIOS,
    video graphics adapter BIOS, adding a new disk to a redundant array and
    extending the size of the system drive partition, etc., have all resulted in
    the unfortunate inactivation of Windows and subsequent failure to reactivate
    automatically requiring yet another call to the product activation center for
    a new product identification key. Although I certainly understand the need to
    protect proprietary rights, this has become an insurmountable effort and
    problem for Microsoft customer who pay for the products and services that
    they receive. This issue needs to be resolved as soon as possible.

    ----------------
    This post is a suggestion for Microsoft, and Microsoft responds to the
    suggestions with the most votes. To vote for this suggestion, click the "I
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    click "I Agree" in the message pane.

    http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/co...0c6&dg=microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general
     
    =?Utf-8?B?RXJpYyBHYXJyZXR0?=, Oct 9, 2007
    #1
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  2. =?Utf-8?B?RXJpYyBHYXJyZXR0?=

    PvdG42 Guest

    "Eric Garrett" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The very slightest of hardware changes has resulted in inactivation of
    > Windows Vista Ultimate 64 bit edition several times. Updating system BIOS,
    > video graphics adapter BIOS, adding a new disk to a redundant array and
    > extending the size of the system drive partition, etc., have all resulted
    > in
    > the unfortunate inactivation of Windows and subsequent failure to
    > reactivate
    > automatically requiring yet another call to the product activation center
    > for
    > a new product identification key. Although I certainly understand the need
    > to
    > protect proprietary rights, this has become an insurmountable effort and
    > problem for Microsoft customer who pay for the products and services that
    > they receive. This issue needs to be resolved as soon as possible.
    >
    > ----------------
    > This post is a suggestion for Microsoft, and Microsoft responds to the
    > suggestions with the most votes. To vote for this suggestion, click the "I
    > Agree" button in the message pane. If you do not see the button, follow
    > this
    > link to open the suggestion in the Microsoft Web-based Newsreader and then
    > click "I Agree" in the message pane.
    >
    > http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/co...0c6&dg=microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general



    I would probably not post this if the original were in the Vista group, as
    it is infested with anti-Vista trolls who will turn any constructive post
    into a travesty of mindless name calling, but here I'll agree that the
    sensitivity level needs to be adjusted, not only in 64 bit editions, but in
    32 bit editions as well.
    BTW, I voted "Yes".
     
    PvdG42, Oct 9, 2007
    #2
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  3. =?Utf-8?B?RXJpYyBHYXJyZXR0?=

    Guest Guest

    Re-Format Your Computer And Install Either 64 Bit Windows Server 2008
    Release Candidate 0, 64 Bit Open Source Linux Ubuntu 7.04 RTW, Or 64 Bit
    Open Source Linux Ubuntu 7.10 Official Beta, Just FYI.

    P.S. 64 Bit Open Source Linux Ubuntu Contains A No Activation Needed, Feel
    Free To Share This CD With Other Computer Users Policy, Just FYI.

    "Eric Garrett" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The very slightest of hardware changes has resulted in inactivation of
    > Windows Vista Ultimate 64 bit edition several times. Updating system BIOS,
    > video graphics adapter BIOS, adding a new disk to a redundant array and
    > extending the size of the system drive partition, etc., have all resulted
    > in
    > the unfortunate inactivation of Windows and subsequent failure to
    > reactivate
    > automatically requiring yet another call to the product activation center
    > for
    > a new product identification key. Although I certainly understand the need
    > to
    > protect proprietary rights, this has become an insurmountable effort and
    > problem for Microsoft customer who pay for the products and services that
    > they receive. This issue needs to be resolved as soon as possible.
    >
    > ----------------
    > This post is a suggestion for Microsoft, and Microsoft responds to the
    > suggestions with the most votes. To vote for this suggestion, click the "I
    > Agree" button in the message pane. If you do not see the button, follow
    > this
    > link to open the suggestion in the Microsoft Web-based Newsreader and then
    > click "I Agree" in the message pane.
    >
    > http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/co...0c6&dg=microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general
     
    Guest, Oct 9, 2007
    #3
  4. Eric:
    I have the following table that I once copied from somewhere in the net
    (can't recall where) that has a "score" for each change you make in your
    hardware.
    Component Class Name Default Weight
    CD-ROM/CD-RW/DVD-ROM 1
    IDE Adaptor 3
    Physical OS Hard Drive Serial # 11
    Display Adaptor 1
    SCSI Adaptor 2
    Audio Adaptor 2
    Network Adaptor MAC Address 2
    Processor 3
    RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-512mb, 512-1GB) 1
    BIOS ID ('0' always matches) 9

    Reactivation is required when you reach the 25 points limit.
    Carlos

    "Eric Garrett" wrote:

    > The very slightest of hardware changes has resulted in inactivation of
    > Windows Vista Ultimate 64 bit edition several times. Updating system BIOS,
    > video graphics adapter BIOS, adding a new disk to a redundant array and
    > extending the size of the system drive partition, etc., have all resulted in
    > the unfortunate inactivation of Windows and subsequent failure to reactivate
    > automatically requiring yet another call to the product activation center for
    > a new product identification key. Although I certainly understand the need to
    > protect proprietary rights, this has become an insurmountable effort and
    > problem for Microsoft customer who pay for the products and services that
    > they receive. This issue needs to be resolved as soon as possible.
    >
    > ----------------
    > This post is a suggestion for Microsoft, and Microsoft responds to the
    > suggestions with the most votes. To vote for this suggestion, click the "I
    > Agree" button in the message pane. If you do not see the button, follow this
    > link to open the suggestion in the Microsoft Web-based Newsreader and then
    > click "I Agree" in the message pane.
    >
    > http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/co...0c6&dg=microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2FybG9z?=, Oct 10, 2007
    #4
  5. =?Utf-8?B?RXJpYyBHYXJyZXR0?=

    PvdG42 Guest

    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Eric:
    > I have the following table that I once copied from somewhere in the net
    > (can't recall where) that has a "score" for each change you make in your
    > hardware.
    > Component Class Name Default Weight
    > CD-ROM/CD-RW/DVD-ROM 1
    > IDE Adaptor 3
    > Physical OS Hard Drive Serial # 11
    > Display Adaptor 1
    > SCSI Adaptor 2
    > Audio Adaptor 2
    > Network Adaptor MAC Address 2
    > Processor 3
    > RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-512mb, 512-1GB) 1
    > BIOS ID ('0' always matches) 9
    >
    > Reactivation is required when you reach the 25 points limit.
    > Carlos
    >

    Do you have a link for this, and are you sure the score table and threshold
    are for Vista?
    I see many reports where simply changing one component, like a video card or
    CPU had triggered a reactivation in Vista. There are also numerous reports
    of a BIOS update with no other changes triggering reactivation. These
    reports seem to be at odds with your table.
     
    PvdG42, Oct 10, 2007
    #5
  6. Hi:
    Check this page
    http://kb.wisc.edu/page.php?id=5294
    under the section "Activation Hardware Tolerance".
    You will find a table similar (or equal) to the one I posted.
    I certainly know for sure that there have been cases where re-activation has
    been asked just by changing the hard disk driver (just the driver, not the
    physical disk), but I cannot account for bugs in Vista reactivation logic.
    :)
    Carlos

    "PvdG42" wrote:

    > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Eric:
    > > I have the following table that I once copied from somewhere in the net
    > > (can't recall where) that has a "score" for each change you make in your
    > > hardware.
    > > Component Class Name Default Weight
    > > CD-ROM/CD-RW/DVD-ROM 1
    > > IDE Adaptor 3
    > > Physical OS Hard Drive Serial # 11
    > > Display Adaptor 1
    > > SCSI Adaptor 2
    > > Audio Adaptor 2
    > > Network Adaptor MAC Address 2
    > > Processor 3
    > > RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-512mb, 512-1GB) 1
    > > BIOS ID ('0' always matches) 9
    > >
    > > Reactivation is required when you reach the 25 points limit.
    > > Carlos
    > >

    > Do you have a link for this, and are you sure the score table and threshold
    > are for Vista?
    > I see many reports where simply changing one component, like a video card or
    > CPU had triggered a reactivation in Vista. There are also numerous reports
    > of a BIOS update with no other changes triggering reactivation. These
    > reports seem to be at odds with your table.
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2FybG9z?=, Oct 10, 2007
    #6
  7. =?Utf-8?B?RXJpYyBHYXJyZXR0?=

    John Barnes Guest

    I haven't seen a later algorithm, and yes it is (was) for Vista. XP was
    different. Many report the need to reactivate with what would be 1 point
    changes in this list.

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=131


    "PvdG42" <> wrote in message
    news:%23MFW$...
    > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Eric:
    >> I have the following table that I once copied from somewhere in the net
    >> (can't recall where) that has a "score" for each change you make in your
    >> hardware.
    >> Component Class Name Default Weight
    >> CD-ROM/CD-RW/DVD-ROM 1
    >> IDE Adaptor 3
    >> Physical OS Hard Drive Serial # 11
    >> Display Adaptor 1
    >> SCSI Adaptor 2
    >> Audio Adaptor 2
    >> Network Adaptor MAC Address 2
    >> Processor 3
    >> RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-512mb, 512-1GB) 1
    >> BIOS ID ('0' always matches) 9
    >>
    >> Reactivation is required when you reach the 25 points limit.
    >> Carlos
    >>

    > Do you have a link for this, and are you sure the score table and
    > threshold are for Vista?
    > I see many reports where simply changing one component, like a video card
    > or CPU had triggered a reactivation in Vista. There are also numerous
    > reports of a BIOS update with no other changes triggering reactivation.
    > These reports seem to be at odds with your table.
    >
     
    John Barnes, Oct 10, 2007
    #7
  8. =?Utf-8?B?RXJpYyBHYXJyZXR0?=

    PvdG42 Guest

    "PvdG42" <> wrote in message
    news:%23MFW$...
    > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Eric:
    >> I have the following table that I once copied from somewhere in the net
    >> (can't recall where) that has a "score" for each change you make in your
    >> hardware.
    >> Component Class Name Default Weight
    >> CD-ROM/CD-RW/DVD-ROM 1
    >> IDE Adaptor 3
    >> Physical OS Hard Drive Serial # 11
    >> Display Adaptor 1
    >> SCSI Adaptor 2
    >> Audio Adaptor 2
    >> Network Adaptor MAC Address 2
    >> Processor 3
    >> RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-512mb, 512-1GB) 1
    >> BIOS ID ('0' always matches) 9
    >>
    >> Reactivation is required when you reach the 25 points limit.
    >> Carlos
    >>

    > Do you have a link for this, and are you sure the score table and
    > threshold are for Vista?
    > I see many reports where simply changing one component, like a video card
    > or CPU had triggered a reactivation in Vista. There are also numerous
    > reports of a BIOS update with no other changes triggering reactivation.
    > These reports seem to be at odds with your table.
    >


    Thank you both, Carlos and John, for the links. Wish I could be sure it
    really worked that way, as I want to upgrade the video card on one Vista box
    here without any hassle :)
     
    PvdG42, Oct 11, 2007
    #8
  9. =?Utf-8?B?RXJpYyBHYXJyZXR0?=

    John Barnes Guest

    I realise it can be a little of a hassle to use telephone update, but it
    usually takes 6-10 minutes max and would be no problem for only a video card
    change. As Carlos said, sometimes a MOBO hd chipset driver will trigger it.

    "PvdG42" <> wrote in message
    news:e%...
    > "PvdG42" <> wrote in message
    > news:%23MFW$...
    >> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Eric:
    >>> I have the following table that I once copied from somewhere in the net
    >>> (can't recall where) that has a "score" for each change you make in your
    >>> hardware.
    >>> Component Class Name Default Weight
    >>> CD-ROM/CD-RW/DVD-ROM 1
    >>> IDE Adaptor 3
    >>> Physical OS Hard Drive Serial # 11
    >>> Display Adaptor 1
    >>> SCSI Adaptor 2
    >>> Audio Adaptor 2
    >>> Network Adaptor MAC Address 2
    >>> Processor 3
    >>> RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-512mb, 512-1GB) 1
    >>> BIOS ID ('0' always matches) 9
    >>>
    >>> Reactivation is required when you reach the 25 points limit.
    >>> Carlos
    >>>

    >> Do you have a link for this, and are you sure the score table and
    >> threshold are for Vista?
    >> I see many reports where simply changing one component, like a video card
    >> or CPU had triggered a reactivation in Vista. There are also numerous
    >> reports of a BIOS update with no other changes triggering reactivation.
    >> These reports seem to be at odds with your table.
    >>

    >
    > Thank you both, Carlos and John, for the links. Wish I could be sure it
    > really worked that way, as I want to upgrade the video card on one Vista
    > box here without any hassle :)
    >
     
    John Barnes, Oct 11, 2007
    #9
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