In camera vs separate exposure meters

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Dave, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters? Are
    there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?
     
    Dave, Feb 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. Dave

    Al Luminium Guest

    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:gJIUd.2179$...
    > How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters?
    > Are there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?
    >
    >

    Not if you take the time to learn how your metering system handles massive
    dark or light backgrounds. Since we're always dealing with a reflected light
    metering situations, I find I'm using exposure compensation a lot, and
    using the bracket function too (although in full auto mode the exposure is
    pretty good, but I lose the depth of field and shutter speed control). I
    think the exposure control is good enough with my Canons, that I never took
    the time to correlate film speed/exposure using my old Sekonic incident
    meter which was my meter of choice back in the days of silver emulsion film.



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    Al Luminium, Feb 28, 2005
    #2
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  3. Dave

    RSD99 Guest

    I think that you will find that the high-end professionals will use both
    .... but are heavily weighted towards using an external meter. Usually this
    will include both incident light meter(s) [which cannot be done "in
    camera], spot meter(s). and special strobe light meters.





    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:gJIUd.2179$...
    > How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters?

    Are
    > there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?
    >
    >
     
    RSD99, Feb 28, 2005
    #3
  4. Dave

    Piemanlager Guest

    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:gJIUd.2179$...
    > How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters?
    > Are there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?



    It really depends on what you are photographing. As a sports photographer i
    never use a hand held meter as it is too time consuming. The minolta
    metering system in the dynax 800si and dynax 9 i used to use is very very
    good, good enough not worry about bracketing with slides even.
    These days even when doing my other job, wedding photography i dont use the
    hand held any more as the histogram gives me the information i want on
    Digital.

    About the only time i use my handheld light meter these days is when setting
    up stdio flash units.

    >
    >
     
    Piemanlager, Feb 28, 2005
    #4
  5. "Dave" <> writes:

    > How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external
    > meters? Are there any significant advantages to a standalone meter
    > these days?


    Well, it's easier to take incident readings with a separate meter
    (though there *are* camera attachments to do it).

    My general experience with digital is that taking test shots and
    examining the histogram display is more accurate than what I can do
    with a separate meter (I've been using separate meters for more than
    thirty years, but have mostly dropped the practice since I've gone
    mostly digital).
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Feb 28, 2005
    #5
  6. Dave

    Guest

    In message <gJIUd.2179$>,
    "Dave" <> wrote:

    >How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters? Are
    >there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?


    You may have to set an external meter to a different ISO than the one in
    the camera, if you want to emulate the camera's exposure. The Canon
    10D, for example, actually sets exposure about 2/3 stop higher than it
    should for the ISO it is set to. For example, when it says ISO 100, it
    is really metering for ISO 64, or when it says ISO 1600, it is really
    metering for ISO 1000.
    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    , Mar 1, 2005
    #6
  7. Dave wrote:

    > How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters? Are
    > there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?
    >
    >

    About the only advantage I see to seperate meter is that with many of
    them you see all the applicable combinations of f/# and shutter speed
    laid out in front of you, and if you are manually exposing you can see
    right away what you will get with a given aperture or shutter speed,
    versus actually setting combinations with camera and see if it works.
    This is a small thing and if you do manual exposure much, you quickly
    get a feel for this anyway.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minneapolis, Mar 1, 2005
    #7
  8. "Dave" <> writes:
    >How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters? Are
    >there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?


    A standalone spot meter will tell you the brightness of a small spot,
    typically 1 degree of arc. Cameras with built-in "spot" meters
    generally measure a considerably wider angle in spot mode, and many
    cameras don't even have a spot mode.

    A handheld incident meter can be used to measure incident light at the
    subject conveniently.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, Mar 1, 2005
    #8
  9. Dave

    bob Guest

    Dave Martindale wrote:
    > "Dave" <> writes:
    >
    >>How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters? Are
    >>there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?

    >
    >
    > A standalone spot meter will tell you the brightness of a small spot,
    > typically 1 degree of arc.


    Also, a spotmeter measures absolute levels of brightness, reporting how
    many EVs of light are reflecting from the subject. Most built in meters
    only give you a suggested exposure.

    With a spot meter, it's pretty easy to see what the range of light
    intensity is: you can point the meter at the bright spot and the dark
    spot, and see how many EV difference there is. With a built in meter,
    this might not be so easy. With my Coolpix camera, the built in meter
    only shows intensity +/- 2 EV from the current exposure setting. If the
    highlight or the shadow was more than 2EV away, then I would need to
    adjust the exposure to see what it was.

    That said, I almost never use my spot meter with my digital camera. In
    practice, it's pretty easy to just take a picture and review the histogram.

    Bob
     
    bob, Mar 1, 2005
    #9
  10. Dave

    George Guest

    I use spot meters, flash meters and color meters. (I haven't, yet, used the
    color meter for digital.) The spot meter is REAL useful as you can meter
    your highlight and your shadow and press a button to average them. The
    flash meter can calculate the exposure for multiple flash firings with
    multiple flash heads and take into account any ambient light. I haven't
    found any in-camera meter that can do any of these things. I use the
    in-camera meter for snapshots...when I am trying to get a specific result on
    an important photo, I use an external meter. (BTW, I consider myself an
    "advanced amateur" in that I've always gotten pretty involved with
    photography and have taken a few college classes but do it strictly as a
    hobby so far.)

    George

    "RSD99" <> wrote in message
    news:A3KUd.67140$wc.52471@trnddc07...
    > I think that you will find that the high-end professionals will use both
    > ... but are heavily weighted towards using an external meter. Usually this
    > will include both incident light meter(s) [which cannot be done "in
    > camera], spot meter(s). and special strobe light meters.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Dave" <> wrote in message
    > news:gJIUd.2179$...
    > > How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters?

    > Are
    > > there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    George, Mar 2, 2005
    #10
  11. Dave

    ZONED! Guest

    On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 08:33:49 -0600, Don Stauffer in Minneapolis
    <> wrote:

    >Dave wrote:
    >
    >> How do in camera exposure meters compare to standalone external meters? Are
    >> there any significant advantages to a standalone meter these days?
    >>
    >>

    >About the only advantage I see to seperate meter is that with many of
    >them you see all the applicable combinations of f/# and shutter speed
    >laid out in front of you, and if you are manually exposing you can see
    >right away what you will get with a given aperture or shutter speed,
    >versus actually setting combinations with camera and see if it works.
    >This is a small thing and if you do manual exposure much, you quickly
    >get a feel for this anyway.


    Ever shoot with off camera flash?
    Multiple off camera flashes?
    In a studio environment?
     
    ZONED!, Mar 2, 2005
    #11
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