Image upload to 300d

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ronviers@gmail.com, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hi,
    I need to upload an image, either a modified raw or a jpg, for purposes
    of control for testing. I have the bundled software and the updates
    from canon. Does anyone know if this can be done? I assumed it would
    be trivial but now I am not so sure. If I upload a jpg I create in
    Photoshop, say an 8 bit file at 3072x2048, and I attach an ICC profile,
    will the profile have any effect?

    Thanks,
    Ron
    , Aug 17, 2006
    #1
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  2. Matt Ion Guest

    wrote:
    >
    > Hi,
    > I need to upload an image, either a modified raw or a jpg, for purposes
    > of control for testing. I have the bundled software and the updates
    > from canon. Does anyone know if this can be done? I assumed it would
    > be trivial but now I am not so sure. If I upload a jpg I create in
    > Photoshop, say an 8 bit file at 3072x2048, and I attach an ICC profile,
    > will the profile have any effect?


    Unless you hack into the camera's operating system, I really doubt you'll find
    ANY digital camera with the ability to transfer an image TO the camera. It
    MIGHT work to use a card reader to put the file(s) on the CF card, then put that
    into the camera.
    Matt Ion, Aug 18, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest


    > Unless you hack into the camera's operating system, I really doubt you'll find
    > ANY digital camera with the ability to transfer an image TO the camera. It
    > MIGHT work to use a card reader to put the file(s) on the CF card, then put that
    > into the camera.


    Putting the image on the reader works but the Canon OS does not
    recognize the format. I will keep trying.
    Thanks,
    Ron
    , Aug 18, 2006
    #3
  4. Cuz Guest

    wrote:
    || Hi,
    || I need to upload an image, either a modified raw or a jpg,
    || for purposes of control for testing. I have the bundled
    || software and the updates from canon. Does anyone know if this
    || can be done? I assumed it would be trivial but now I am not
    || so sure. If I upload a jpg I create in Photoshop, say an 8
    || bit file at 3072x2048, and I attach an ICC profile, will the
    || profile have any effect?
    ||
    || Thanks,
    || Ron

    What are you trying to fake?

    --
    It's a place to listen and read for a while, called lurking. Get
    an idea of the tone of the community. Learn who the trolls and
    troublemakers are and ignore them.
    Cuz, Aug 18, 2006
    #4
  5. wrote:
    []
    > Putting the image on the reader works but the Canon OS does not
    > recognize the format. I will keep trying.
    > Thanks,
    > Ron


    You could try my TVwriter software to make the image recognised by the
    camera.

    http://www.david-taylor.myby.co.uk/software/imaging.html#TVwriter

    I can't vouch (yet) that it will work for the 300D. I would be most
    surprised if the camera used ICC profile information.

    David
    David J Taylor, Aug 18, 2006
    #5
  6. Jim Townsend Guest

    Matt Ion wrote:

    > wrote:
    >>
    >> Hi,
    >> I need to upload an image, either a modified raw or a jpg, for purposes
    >> of control for testing. I have the bundled software and the updates
    >> from canon. Does anyone know if this can be done? I assumed it would
    >> be trivial but now I am not so sure. If I upload a jpg I create in
    >> Photoshop, say an 8 bit file at 3072x2048, and I attach an ICC profile,
    >> will the profile have any effect?

    >
    > Unless you hack into the camera's operating system, I really doubt you'll find
    > ANY digital camera with the ability to transfer an image TO the camera. It
    > MIGHT work to use a card reader to put the file(s) on the CF card, then put that
    > into the camera.


    You can transfer images to some Canon cameras using their supplied software
    (Zoombrowser).

    The images must be in exactly the same format the camera produced. The camera
    firmware has little tolerance for anything else. Editing and saving an image with an
    external image editor can result in an image that won't display on the camera LCD.
    The file names must match the standard naming convention used in DCIM.

    Essentially you can put an unedited image back in the camera if you want.
    Jim Townsend, Aug 18, 2006
    #6
  7. Guest


    > What are you trying to fake?
    >


    Hi Cuz,
    Here is a description of the test, but you notice at the end the
    results are bogus. I think I can fix it with a manufactured raw and
    shoot in jpg.
    I have a titanium white backdrop - perfectly white.
    First I set the 'Windows Desktop' color to white. Then clear all icons
    and put the
    theme to Windows Classic to get rid of the blue line at the bottom.
    This turns the monitor into a white light. Then point the monitor at
    the titanium white backdrop and photograph the backdrop using raw.
    Then load that image into ACR or RSE to get a balance then adjust the
    monitor's temp according to that and reshoot as needed.
    I painted my main light reflector, by mixing acrylics, so it lights the

    backdrop neutral, that is, when I photograph the backdrop, in raw, and
    load the image into RSE or ACR in Adobe RGB at 16 bit, I get a readout
    of R=197,G=197,B=192 a tiny bit yellow I admit but I thought I could
    live with that being tired of mixing paint. I have never used a D50
    but I bet they are not much better than that.
    Anyway, next I convert the raw image, to Tiff with RSE and PSD with
    ACR, with no modifications in either converter, and open them with CS2.

    I do this on two computers, my fast one and my slow one. My working
    space is Adobe RGB and mode is 16 bit/channel. Both computers CS2
    environments are identical and both use CRTs.
    After the conversion I have both the Tiff and the PSD loaded on each
    computer. I check the readouts at the several coordinates and get the
    exact same reading on both the output from RSE and ACR - e.g., at
    5000x3500, I get R=196,G=197,B=191. This is a surprise but also a
    relief. I kinda thought they would convert them slightly differently.
    Then I set CS2 to display the image of the converted raw file, the PSD,

    in full screen preview. So now I have a Photoshop image of my raw file

    displayed on the CRT. Then I set the original raw file still in the
    camera as the source for the custom white balance setting for the
    camera.
    Next I photograph the Photoshop image at a quarter second to get
    several screens of refreshed image.
    Then I load that image back into RSE and ACR. So what do you think I
    get? I thought I would get a nice neutral image possibly a little
    yellow. But no! I get a very blue image.
    Like I said I think it can be fixed by a custom raw and shooting in
    jpg.

    Ron
    , Aug 18, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest


    > I can't vouch (yet) that it will work for the 300D. I would be most
    > surprised if the camera used ICC profile information.


    Hi David,
    You've been busy. I don't think your viewer/converter will work
    for my purposes but it looks like a very nice product.

    Thanks,
    Ron
    , Aug 19, 2006
    #8
  9. Bill Funk Guest

    On 18 Aug 2006 09:50:26 -0700, ""
    <> wrote:

    >
    >> What are you trying to fake?
    >>

    >
    >Hi Cuz,
    >Here is a description of the test, but you notice at the end the
    >results are bogus. I think I can fix it with a manufactured raw and
    >shoot in jpg.
    >I have a titanium white backdrop - perfectly white.
    >First I set the 'Windows Desktop' color to white. Then clear all icons
    >and put the
    >theme to Windows Classic to get rid of the blue line at the bottom.
    >This turns the monitor into a white light. Then point the monitor at
    >the titanium white backdrop and photograph the backdrop using raw.
    >Then load that image into ACR or RSE to get a balance then adjust the
    >monitor's temp according to that and reshoot as needed.
    >I painted my main light reflector, by mixing acrylics, so it lights the
    >
    >backdrop neutral, that is, when I photograph the backdrop, in raw, and
    >load the image into RSE or ACR in Adobe RGB at 16 bit, I get a readout
    >of R=197,G=197,B=192 a tiny bit yellow I admit but I thought I could
    >live with that being tired of mixing paint. I have never used a D50
    >but I bet they are not much better than that.
    >Anyway, next I convert the raw image, to Tiff with RSE and PSD with
    >ACR, with no modifications in either converter, and open them with CS2.
    >
    > I do this on two computers, my fast one and my slow one. My working
    >space is Adobe RGB and mode is 16 bit/channel. Both computers CS2
    >environments are identical and both use CRTs.
    >After the conversion I have both the Tiff and the PSD loaded on each
    >computer. I check the readouts at the several coordinates and get the
    >exact same reading on both the output from RSE and ACR - e.g., at
    >5000x3500, I get R=196,G=197,B=191. This is a surprise but also a
    >relief. I kinda thought they would convert them slightly differently.
    >Then I set CS2 to display the image of the converted raw file, the PSD,
    >
    >in full screen preview. So now I have a Photoshop image of my raw file
    >
    >displayed on the CRT. Then I set the original raw file still in the
    >camera as the source for the custom white balance setting for the
    >camera.
    >Next I photograph the Photoshop image at a quarter second to get
    >several screens of refreshed image.
    >Then I load that image back into RSE and ACR. So what do you think I
    >get? I thought I would get a nice neutral image possibly a little
    >yellow. But no! I get a very blue image.
    >Like I said I think it can be fixed by a custom raw and shooting in
    >jpg.
    >
    >Ron


    Maybe it's just me, but I am at a loss as to what you are trying to
    do.
    It seems as though you're trying to get an accurate shot off your
    monitor of an image, but why? You have the image, why shoot it?
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Aug 19, 2006
    #9
  10. Guest

    >
    > Maybe it's just me, but I am at a loss as to what you are trying to
    > do.
    > It seems as though you're trying to get an accurate shot off your
    > monitor of an image, but why? You have the image, why shoot it?
    > --
    > Bill Funk
    > replace "g" with "a"


    Hi Bill,
    I am trying to use my camera to calibrate my color correction and
    profile my CRT.
    I realized that all I need to do to get neutral data into the camera is

    to either fully saturate the sensor or completely deplete it. So I
    first took a picture at 1/4000 of a second with aperture closed and
    lens cap on at ISO 100. I know that all sounds redundant but I tried
    other settings with the lens cap on and those settings gave me the
    skinniest (most dark) histogram. Then I took another picture while
    holding the camera directly at a light with a 30 sec exposure. All the

    histogram flashed so I knew it was full. Then I used the black (fully
    depleted) image as the source file for wb. Then I took a picture of a
    backdrop with a blue cast. This gave me an image of R=76,G=117,B=58.
    Then I took the same picture with the white (fully saturated) image as
    the source for wb and got R=77,G=117,B=59. Consistency! Now all I have

    to do is create an image in CS2 with the color ratio of something like
    R=131,G=100,B=159 to cancel out the green then I should have a truly
    white subject to photograph so I can remix my paints and get rid of the

    blue cast on the original backdrop. So my question is, can anyone
    explain why, if I use either the depleted or saturated image as a
    source for wb the resulting image is so green? And remember it is
    green even though I am photographing a subject that has a blue cast.
    Btw, green does not bother me as long I can count on those ratios.
    Thanks,
    Ron
    , Aug 19, 2006
    #10
  11. Bill Funk Guest

    On 19 Aug 2006 10:42:31 -0700, ""
    <> wrote:

    >>
    >> Maybe it's just me, but I am at a loss as to what you are trying to
    >> do.
    >> It seems as though you're trying to get an accurate shot off your
    >> monitor of an image, but why? You have the image, why shoot it?
    >> --
    >> Bill Funk
    >> replace "g" with "a"

    >
    >Hi Bill,
    >I am trying to use my camera to calibrate my color correction and
    >profile my CRT.
    >I realized that all I need to do to get neutral data into the camera is
    >
    >to either fully saturate the sensor or completely deplete it. So I
    >first took a picture at 1/4000 of a second with aperture closed and
    >lens cap on at ISO 100. I know that all sounds redundant but I tried
    >other settings with the lens cap on and those settings gave me the
    >skinniest (most dark) histogram. Then I took another picture while
    >holding the camera directly at a light with a 30 sec exposure. All the
    >
    >histogram flashed so I knew it was full. Then I used the black (fully
    >depleted) image as the source file for wb. Then I took a picture of a
    >backdrop with a blue cast. This gave me an image of R=76,G=117,B=58.
    >Then I took the same picture with the white (fully saturated) image as
    >the source for wb and got R=77,G=117,B=59. Consistency! Now all I have
    >
    >to do is create an image in CS2 with the color ratio of something like
    >R=131,G=100,B=159 to cancel out the green then I should have a truly
    >white subject to photograph so I can remix my paints and get rid of the
    >
    >blue cast on the original backdrop. So my question is, can anyone
    >explain why, if I use either the depleted or saturated image as a
    >source for wb the resulting image is so green? And remember it is
    >green even though I am photographing a subject that has a blue cast.
    >Btw, green does not bother me as long I can count on those ratios.
    >Thanks,
    >Ron


    If you want to calibrate your CRT so finely, you must first make sure
    you have a fine CRT. What model do you have?
    Then, there are devices on the market to fine-tune your monitor, like,
    for example, the Colorvision Spider
    http://www.colorvision.com/index_us.html

    Is this what you're trying to do?

    It sounds like it is.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Aug 20, 2006
    #11
  12. Guest


    > If you want to calibrate your CRT so finely, you must first make sure
    > you have a fine CRT. What model do you have?
    > Then, there are devices on the market to fine-tune your monitor, like,
    > for example, the Colorvision Spider
    > http://www.colorvision.com/index_us.html
    >
    > Is this what you're trying to do?
    >
    > It sounds like it is.
    > --
    > Bill Funk
    > replace "g" with "a"


    Hi Bill,
    Yes, but I wanted to calibrate my not so fine 'Gateway' monitor and do
    it for free. Mostly it is an exercise to familiarize myself with my
    equipment. I have learned tons just trying to turn a thousand dollar
    camera into a twenty dollar photodiode.

    Thanks,
    Ron
    , Aug 20, 2006
    #12
  13. Bill Funk Guest

    On 19 Aug 2006 22:10:00 -0700, ""
    <> wrote:

    >
    >> If you want to calibrate your CRT so finely, you must first make sure
    >> you have a fine CRT. What model do you have?
    >> Then, there are devices on the market to fine-tune your monitor, like,
    >> for example, the Colorvision Spider
    >> http://www.colorvision.com/index_us.html
    >>
    >> Is this what you're trying to do?
    >>
    >> It sounds like it is.
    >> --
    >> Bill Funk
    >> replace "g" with "a"

    >
    >Hi Bill,
    >Yes, but I wanted to calibrate my not so fine 'Gateway' monitor and do
    >it for free. Mostly it is an exercise to familiarize myself with my
    >equipment. I have learned tons just trying to turn a thousand dollar
    >camera into a twenty dollar photodiode.
    >
    >Thanks,
    >Ron


    Sounds like the software that wants to turn my $1700 computer into a
    $39.95 TV! :)
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Aug 20, 2006
    #13
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