Image Stabilizer A Must

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by DonB, Dec 28, 2004.

  1. DonB

    DonB Guest

    I bought a Panasonic FZ 15 with 12x zoom and image stabilizer for my
    wife who takes animal shots.
    When I managed to get it from her for an experiment, telephoto and
    macro, it outperformed my Nikon 4500, a respected camera, especially
    for macro work.
    My conclusion is that image stabilizers must become the norm for
    digicams. There is just no comparison. I have a link to a difficult
    macro picture from the Panasonic in the bushes, where a tripod would
    have been impossible, and the Nikon pictures without stabilizer just
    did not compare.
    DonB

    http://www.photo.net/photodb/photo?topic_id=1481&msg_id=00AZnR&photo_id=2989487&photo_sel_index=0
     
    DonB, Dec 28, 2004
    #1
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  2. I know what you mean, I have a KM Z3 and image stabilization at 12x
    (48x) is simply a must.
     
    Darin Kaloyanov, Dec 28, 2004
    #2
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  3. DonB

    SleeperMan Guest

    DonB wrote:
    > I bought a Panasonic FZ 15 with 12x zoom and image stabilizer for my
    > wife who takes animal shots.
    > When I managed to get it from her for an experiment, telephoto and
    > macro, it outperformed my Nikon 4500, a respected camera, especially
    > for macro work.
    > My conclusion is that image stabilizers must become the norm for
    > digicams. There is just no comparison. I have a link to a difficult
    > macro picture from the Panasonic in the bushes, where a tripod would
    > have been impossible, and the Nikon pictures without stabilizer just
    > did not compare.
    > DonB
    >
    > http://www.photo.net/photodb/photo?topic_id=1481&msg_id=00AZnR&photo_id=2989487&photo_sel_index=0


    Yep, i totally second that!
     
    SleeperMan, Dec 28, 2004
    #3
  4. DonB

    Russell Guest

    I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.

    A question : If I use a tripod, should I turn the stabilisation off? I
    have heard somewhere that image stabilisation does not work well with
    tripods.

    Cheers,
    Russell.
     
    Russell, Dec 28, 2004
    #4
  5. Russell wrote:
    > I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.
    >
    > A question : If I use a tripod, should I turn the stabilisation off? I
    > have heard somewhere that image stabilisation does not work well with
    > tripods.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Russell.


    As for your question I suggest you experiment. My personal experience
    may not be the same as yours.

    Now for the question you did not ask. I would say that it is not a
    question of it working or not working with a tripod, it is simply not needed
    with a good tripod.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
     
    Joseph Meehan, Dec 28, 2004
    #5
  6. Since it does save battery power if turned off and you want to use a
    tripod, then it might be a good idea :)
     
    Darin Kaloyanov, Dec 28, 2004
    #6
  7. DonB

    Larry Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.
    >
    > A question : If I use a tripod, should I turn the stabilisation off? I
    > have heard somewhere that image stabilisation does not work well with
    > tripods.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Russell.
    >



    The only problem you should get from using IS on a tripod is battery life.

    It takes some power to run the stabilizer, but Im not sure if it uses much
    power while on a tripod as the lens is already stable...

    What could it hurt to shut it off???

    If outdoors the wind COULD affect the stability of the camera on a tripod,
    depending on your shutter speed.

    As for the "somewhere" you heard... ignore it, unless it was siting specific
    intelligent reasons.


    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry, Dec 28, 2004
    #7
  8. Russell wrote:
    > I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.


    I presume you mean /without/ IS!

    > A question : If I use a tripod, should I turn the stabilisation off? I
    > have heard somewhere that image stabilisation does not work well with
    > tripods.


    There was an issue with some older IS lenses - expensive ones designed for
    SLRs - whereby if they do not detect motion they may still move the IS
    elements, thereby introducing a small amount of blur into the picture. I
    don't know if this is still true with today's IS lenses.

    On the FZ20, I'm sure I've used a tripod and accidentally forgotten to
    switch the IS off. I haven't noticed any ill effect from so doing. Very
    pleased with the FZ20, though, and I hope you are as well!

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 28, 2004
    #8
  9. DonB

    Russell Guest

    On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 14:10:08 -0000, "David J Taylor"
    <> wrote:

    >Russell wrote:
    >> I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.

    >
    >I presume you mean /without/ IS!
    >


    Oops, yes, that was a typo :)

    Cheers
    Russell.
     
    Russell, Dec 28, 2004
    #9
  10. DonB

    Stacey Guest

    DonB wrote:

    > I bought a Panasonic FZ 15 with 12x zoom and image stabilizer for my
    > wife who takes animal shots.
    > When I managed to get it from her for an experiment, telephoto and
    > macro, it outperformed my Nikon 4500, a respected camera, especially
    > for macro work.
    > My conclusion is that image stabilizers must become the norm for
    > digicams. There is just no comparison. I have a link to a difficult
    > macro picture from the Panasonic in the bushes, where a tripod would
    > have been impossible, and the Nikon pictures without stabilizer just
    > did not compare.



    Something you should be trying for hand held macro work is an off camera
    flash cord/bracket. The instantaneous light (less than 1/1000 sec) from a
    flash freezes any camera motion and is going to end up MUCH better than
    even an IS image would be. I did this for years with my old OM 35mm TTL
    camera. Was able to shoot at f22 for more DOF and still get very sharp
    images in any light condition.

    For sports etc IS is great at keeping the lens size reasonable but for macro
    use, this flash technique is a better way to go. Given how automated the
    flash units are with TTY off camera flash control, this is simple to use in
    the field.
    --

    Stacey
     
    Stacey, Dec 28, 2004
    #10
  11. In article <>,
    Russell <> wrote:

    > I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.
    >
    > A question : If I use a tripod, should I turn the stabilisation off? I
    > have heard somewhere that image stabilisation does not work well with
    > tripods.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Russell.


    IS slightly vibrates and drifts due to imperfections in the system. It
    can add motion blur, especially on long exposures. Some IS systems have
    an activation threshold to reduce blur while using a tripod. I can
    never get that fat Canon strap to stop flapping the wind so sometimes I
    still use IS on a tripod.

    Besides that, IS drains the battery like mad. It's especially bad on
    CMOS DSLR cameras, which have batteries sized for a camera that draws
    very little power.
     
    Kevin McMurtrie, Dec 29, 2004
    #11
  12. Kevin McMurtrie wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Russell <> wrote:
    >
    >> I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.

    []
    > Besides that, IS drains the battery like mad. It's especially bad on
    > CMOS DSLR cameras, which have batteries sized for a camera that draws
    > very little power.


    However, on the FZ20 the extra battery drain due to switching on IS is
    only a few percent (according to reviews). Nothing to worry about.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 29, 2004
    #12
  13. Russell wrote:
    > I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.
    >
    > A question : If I use a tripod, should I turn the stabilisation off? I
    > have heard somewhere that image stabilisation does not work well with
    > tripods.


    Check the manual - my Maxxum 7D book-of-words recommends shutting off
    the anti-shake system when used on a tripod; my experience when I have
    bobheimered turning it off has been that there is indeed some blur from
    the AS apparently 'twiddling its thumbs' as it looks for something to
    do.

    Bob ^,,^
     
    Bob Harrington, Dec 29, 2004
    #13
  14. DonB

    tomcas Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:
    > Kevin McMurtrie wrote:
    >
    >>In article <>,
    >>Russell <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.

    >
    > []
    >
    >>Besides that, IS drains the battery like mad. It's especially bad on
    >>CMOS DSLR cameras, which have batteries sized for a camera that draws
    >>very little power.

    >
    >
    > However, on the FZ20 the extra battery drain due to switching on IS is
    > only a few percent (according to reviews). Nothing to worry about.
    >
    > David
    >
    >

    Same here with the Canon S1, I leave the IS on all the time and the
    batteries still last a long time.
     
    tomcas, Dec 29, 2004
    #14
  15. DonB

    Skip M Guest

    "Kevin McMurtrie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > Russell <> wrote:
    >
    >> I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.
    >>
    >> A question : If I use a tripod, should I turn the stabilisation off? I
    >> have heard somewhere that image stabilisation does not work well with
    >> tripods.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >> Russell.

    >
    > IS slightly vibrates and drifts due to imperfections in the system. It
    > can add motion blur, especially on long exposures. Some IS systems have
    > an activation threshold to reduce blur while using a tripod. I can
    > never get that fat Canon strap to stop flapping the wind so sometimes I
    > still use IS on a tripod.
    >
    > Besides that, IS drains the battery like mad. It's especially bad on
    > CMOS DSLR cameras, which have batteries sized for a camera that draws
    > very little power.


    I get several hundred exposures to a BP-511 battery, in the neighborhood of
    600, with my 20D and 28-135 IS and 100-400 IS. Admittedly, I'd get more
    using a non IS lens, but that's more images than I used to get with my A2,
    the same lenses, and a 2CR5 battery.

    --
    Skip Middleton
    http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
     
    Skip M, Dec 29, 2004
    #15
  16. DonB

    Skip M Guest

    "Bob Harrington" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Russell wrote:
    >> I have the FZ20 and could not live with IS.
    >>
    >> A question : If I use a tripod, should I turn the stabilisation off? I
    >> have heard somewhere that image stabilisation does not work well with
    >> tripods.

    >
    > Check the manual - my Maxxum 7D book-of-words recommends shutting off the
    > anti-shake system when used on a tripod; my experience when I have
    > bobheimered turning it off has been that there is indeed some blur from
    > the AS apparently 'twiddling its thumbs' as it looks for something to do.
    >
    > Bob ^,,^
    >


    Hmmm, sounds like the old version of Canon's IS, the 28-135, 75-300 and
    100-400 say the same thing. The newer 70-200, for instance, and the Nikon
    VR lenses, sense the immobility, and either shut off the IS, or in some way
    make it less intrusive.
    --
    Skip Middleton
    http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
     
    Skip M, Dec 29, 2004
    #16
  17. DonB

    Bill Hilton Guest

    > Besides that, IS drains the battery like mad. It's especially bad on
    > CMOS DSLR cameras


    Someone measured the actual currents on a Canon lens, I think it was the 500
    f/4 L, and posted the results here a few months back ... as I remember,
    autofocus was by far the biggest current sink and IS added very little extra
    .... maybe someone can find the post and attach the data in this thread. But IS
    doesn't cause rapid battery drain for the Canon dSLRs, based on personal
    experience and the actual measurements this guy got.

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Dec 29, 2004
    #17
  18. DonB

    MarkH Guest

    dy (Bill Hilton) wrote in
    news::

    >> Besides that, IS drains the battery like mad. It's especially bad on
    >> CMOS DSLR cameras

    >
    > Someone measured the actual currents on a Canon lens, I think it was
    > the 500 f/4 L, and posted the results here a few months back ... as I
    > remember, autofocus was by far the biggest current sink and IS added
    > very little extra ... maybe someone can find the post and attach the
    > data in this thread. But IS doesn't cause rapid battery drain for the
    > Canon dSLRs, based on personal experience and the actual measurements
    > this guy got.


    I totally agree!

    I can also add my experience here: I use a Canon 10D and Canon 28-135 IS
    lens, the battery drain using IS would certainly be higher but it does NOT
    drain the battery like mad. If I can get 4 hours of use taking 500 photos
    on one battery without using IS then I would get about 3 ½ hours and over
    400 photos with IS turned on. Totally worth using IS in my opinion.


    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 12-Nov-04)
    "There are 10 types of people, those that
    understand binary and those that don't"
     
    MarkH, Dec 29, 2004
    #18
  19. DonB

    Ben Thomas Guest

    Kevin McMurtrie wrote:

    > I can never get that fat Canon strap to stop flapping the wind so sometimes I
    > still use IS on a tripod.


    You would benefit from some sort of quick-release for the strap so you can
    easily disconnect it from the camera when using a tripod. Either that or a
    velcro tie to tie it to one of the tripod legs to reduce the flapping.

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.

    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Dec 29, 2004
    #19
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