Image size, aspec ratio?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Bill Bowden, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. Bill Bowden

    Bill Bowden Guest

    I have a GIF image with an aspect ratio of about 2:1 that I want to
    place 4 copies onto a standard 4X6 drugstore print so each image is
    about 2 inches by 1 inch. Each 4X6 print will contain 4 identical
    images measuring about 1 by 2.

    Loading the GIF image into PhotoShop6 produces a file of 1047 pix wide
    by 449 pix high with a resolution of 72 ppi. The document dimensions
    are stated as 14.542 inches wide by 6.236 inches high.

    I can copy and paste the GIF image into a new file, so there are 4
    images in the new file, but the question is, what resolution and other
    details should I use to insure the final result is a high resolution
    4X6 print with the four images having the correct dimensions?

    -Bill
     
    Bill Bowden, Jun 2, 2008
    #1
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  2. Bill Bowden

    Bob Williams Guest

    Bill Bowden wrote:
    > I have a GIF image with an aspect ratio of about 2:1 that I want to
    > place 4 copies onto a standard 4X6 drugstore print so each image is
    > about 2 inches by 1 inch. Each 4X6 print will contain 4 identical
    > images measuring about 1 by 2.
    >
    > Loading the GIF image into PhotoShop6 produces a file of 1047 pix wide
    > by 449 pix high with a resolution of 72 ppi. The document dimensions
    > are stated as 14.542 inches wide by 6.236 inches high.
    >
    > I can copy and paste the GIF image into a new file, so there are 4
    > images in the new file, but the question is, what resolution and other
    > details should I use to insure the final result is a high resolution
    > 4X6 print with the four images having the correct dimensions?
    >
    > -Bill
    >

    To make a high quality 4x6 print with 4 identical images with 2/1 aspect
    ratio do the following in PS6:
    Create your NEW image as 4X6 inches @ 300 ppi.
    CROP each gif to the dimensions 2" X 1" @300 ppi. (you will lose a
    little bit on the width because you are converting an image with an
    aspect ratio of 14.52/6.24 = 2.33/1.00, to one with an aspect ratio of 2/1)
    The Crop tool will direct PS6 to automatically convert the image to 2"
    x1" at a resolution of 300ppi.
    Drag the cropped images onto the NEW image and position them as you
    like. The key here is to make the NEW image have the same resolution as
    the cropped images so the cropped images will fit correctly in the new file.

    If you don't want to lose ANY width of your GIFs then set your crop tool
    at 2.33" x 1.00" @300 ppi. They will still fit nicely into your NEW
    image but will have their original aspect ratio instead of 2/1
    Bob Williams
     
    Bob Williams, Jun 2, 2008
    #2
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  3. Bill Bowden

    Bill Bowden Guest

    On Jun 1, 10:56 pm, Bob Williams <> wrote:
    > Bill Bowden wrote:
    > > I have a GIF image with an aspect ratio of about 2:1 that I want to
    > > place 4 copies onto a standard 4X6 drugstore print so each image is
    > > about 2 inches by 1 inch. Each 4X6 print will contain 4 identical
    > > images measuring about 1 by 2.

    >
    > > Loading the GIF image into PhotoShop6 produces a file of 1047 pix wide
    > > by 449 pix high with a resolution of 72 ppi. The document dimensions
    > > are stated as 14.542 inches wide by 6.236 inches high.

    >
    > > I can copy and paste the GIF image into a new file, so there are 4
    > > images in the new file, but the question is, what resolution and other
    > > details should I use to insure the final result is a high resolution
    > > 4X6 print with the four images having the correct dimensions?

    >
    > > -Bill

    >
    > To make a high quality 4x6 print with 4 identical images with 2/1 aspect
    > ratio do the following in PS6:
    > Create your NEW image as 4X6 inches @ 300 ppi.
    > CROP each gif to the dimensions 2" X 1" @300 ppi. (you will lose a
    > little bit on the width because you are converting an image with an
    > aspect ratio of 14.52/6.24 = 2.33/1.00, to one with an aspect ratio of 2/1)
    > The Crop tool will direct PS6 to automatically convert the image to 2"
    > x1" at a resolution of 300ppi.
    > Drag the cropped images onto the NEW image and position them as you
    > like. The key here is to make the NEW image have the same resolution as
    > the cropped images so the cropped images will fit correctly in the new file.
    >
    > If you don't want to lose ANY width of your GIFs then set your crop tool
    > at 2.33" x 1.00" @300 ppi. They will still fit nicely into your NEW
    > image but will have their original aspect ratio instead of 2/1
    > Bob Williams


    Yes, that worked quite well. But after looking at the border space, it
    wasn't enough for the print I want, so I just dragged two copies of
    the GIF file to the new image so there is plenty of white border to
    work with. I'll have it printed tomorrow at Kinko's. It's hard to find
    a good printing service around here. Most of the drug store and Wal-
    Mart printers are broken, so I called Kinko's and they seem to think
    they can do a better job. Ideally, I'd like to make a "transfer" print
    I can "rub on" to a white painted surface, but Kinko's said the
    process requires 350 degrees of heat which would damage the paint. So,
    I might have to just mount the print onto the painted surface.

    Thanks for your input,

    -Bill
     
    Bill Bowden, Jun 6, 2008
    #3
  4. On Jun 6, 1:12 am, Bill Bowden <> wrote:
    > On Jun 1, 10:56 pm, Bob Williams <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Bill Bowden wrote:
    > > > I have a GIF image with an aspect ratio of about 2:1 that I want to
    > > > place 4 copies onto a standard 4X6 drugstore print so each image is
    > > > about 2 inches by 1 inch. Each 4X6 print will contain 4 identical
    > > > images measuring about 1 by 2.

    >
    > > > Loading the GIF image into PhotoShop6 produces a file of 1047 pix wide
    > > > by 449 pix high with a resolution of 72 ppi. The document dimensions
    > > > are stated as 14.542 inches wide by 6.236 inches high.

    >
    > > > I can copy and paste the GIF image into a new file, so there are 4
    > > > images in the new file, but the question is, what resolution and other
    > > > details should I use to insure the final result is a high resolution
    > > > 4X6 print with the four images having the correct dimensions?

    >
    > > > -Bill

    >
    > > To make a high quality 4x6 print with 4 identical images with 2/1 aspect
    > > ratio do the following in PS6:
    > > Create your NEW image as 4X6 inches @ 300 ppi.
    > > CROP each gif to the dimensions 2" X 1" @300 ppi. (you will lose a
    > > little bit on the width because you are converting an image with an
    > > aspect ratio of 14.52/6.24 = 2.33/1.00, to one with an aspect ratio of 2/1)
    > > The Crop tool will direct PS6 to automatically convert the image to 2"
    > > x1" at a resolution of 300ppi.
    > > Drag the cropped images onto the NEW image and position them as you
    > > like. The key here is to make the NEW image have the same resolution as
    > > the cropped images so the cropped images will fit correctly in the new file.

    >
    > > If you don't want to lose ANY width of your GIFs then set your crop tool
    > > at 2.33" x 1.00" @300 ppi. They will still fit nicely into your NEW
    > > image but will have their original aspect ratio instead of 2/1
    > > Bob Williams

    >
    > Yes, that worked quite well. But after looking at the border space, it
    > wasn't enough for the print I want, so I just dragged two copies of
    > the GIF file to the new image so there is plenty of white border to
    > work with. I'll have it printed tomorrow at Kinko's. It's hard to find
    > a good printing service around here. Most of the drug store and Wal-
    > Mart printers are broken, so I called Kinko's and they seem to think
    > they can do a better job. Ideally, I'd like to make a "transfer" print
    > I can "rub on" to a white painted surface, but Kinko's said the
    > process requires 350 degrees of heat which would damage the paint. So,
    > I might have to just mount the print onto the painted surface.
    >
    > Thanks for your input,
    >
    > -Bill


    Rather than a heated transfer, consider a water slide decal. There
    are decal sheets available for inkjet printers. No heat or rubbing is
    required- just soak sheet in water for a minute or two, and transfer
    decal film to surface. Oh, yeah, after printing coat decal surface
    with a clear spray like krylon or similar, first coat not very wet,
    second coat good thick/wet.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Jun 6, 2008
    #4
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