Illegal File Name - How to rename.

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by fry_day@TGIF.com, Nov 29, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:

    31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3

    I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    located although the list command works.

    Suggestions?

    Thanks,
    Fry Day
     
    , Nov 29, 2006
    #1
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  2. wrote in
    news::

    > I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs.
    > Several of the files are named with Illegal characters, for
    > example:
    >
    > 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >
    > I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows
    > can only see the files and can't, or won't, do anything
    > with them. Even the command line rename and copy prompts
    > report that the files can't be located although the list
    > command works.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Fry Day
    >



    Need to know which Windoze you're working with... But, what
    happens with Windows is the path is too long on some of these
    funky files, so you could try to move the folder with all the
    files and just paste it on your C:\ drive.

    Then the path is *not* C:\Douchements & Sittingz\Your very
    special User account\Desktop\folder of files\very very very
    long file name with funky characters

    Rather it *is* C:\folder of files\very very very long file
    name with funky characters

    Now, *maybe* , Windows Explorer can phreeking handle it... but
    I've had some that I just needed to do the above, and to use a
    3rd party file renamer. I like "Better File Rename" but there
    are several out there.

    What most folks do with the characters is substitute a "-" for
    the unrecognized symbol. In your example, I'd go with

    31 - Oh.no,she.said....mp3

    But, there's different conventions, some may prefer

    31_-_Oh_no_she_said-.mp3



    Best wishes to you and yours for a safe and joyous holiday
    season.

    --

    I wouldn't be a bit surprised if someday some fishermen
    caught a big shark and cut it open, and there inside was a
    whole person. Then they cut the person open, and inside him
    is a little baby shark. And in the baby shark there is not a
    person, because the baby shark would still be too small. But
    there's a little doll or something, like a GI Joe or Barbie
    little toy person - something like that. Then they cut the
    toy person open, and there's the King Cake Baby Jesus doll.
    Curses! I never get the free drink... Well, there's always
    next year.
     
    Bucky Breeder, Nov 29, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. richard Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    > the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >
    > 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >
    > I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    > see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    > command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    > located although the list command works.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Fry Da


    Remove the quotes as well as the crap after [said].

    31) oh_no_she_said.mp3
     
    richard, Nov 29, 2006
    #3
  4. semi-one Guest

    On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 10:21:53 -0700, "richard" <> wrote:

    >
    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    >> the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >>
    >> 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >>
    >> I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    >> see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    >> command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    >> located although the list command works.
    >>
    >> Suggestions?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Fry Da

    >
    >Remove the quotes as well as the crap after [said].
    >
    >31) oh_no_she_said.mp3
    >

    I'd love to but although explorer "sees" the files, it won't allow any
    action to the files. I can't copy them to a folder, rename them to a
    different location, etc. As I mentioned, I even tried the copy and
    xcopy command from DOS. I can list the files but nothing else.
     
    semi-one, Nov 29, 2006
    #4
  5. semi-one <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 10:21:53 -0700, "richard" <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >><> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>>I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    >>> the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >>>
    >>> 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >>>
    >>> I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    >>> see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    >>> command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    >>> located although the list command works.
    >>>
    >>> Suggestions?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> Fry Da

    >>
    >>Remove the quotes as well as the crap after [said].
    >>
    >>31) oh_no_she_said.mp3
    >>

    > I'd love to but although explorer "sees" the files, it won't allow any
    > action to the files. I can't copy them to a folder, rename them to a
    > different location, etc. As I mentioned, I even tried the copy and
    > xcopy command from DOS. I can list the files but nothing else.
    >

    Where are they right now?
     
    Bucky Breeder, Nov 29, 2006
    #5
  6. 7 Guest

    wrote:

    > I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    > the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >
    > 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >
    > I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    > see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    > command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    > located although the list command works.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Fry Day



    Load up liveCD like knoppix, DSL etc, mount the disk read/write, and then
    rename dumb file names that windopz exploder can't handle
    to heart's content.
    http://www.livecdlist.com
     
    7, Nov 29, 2006
    #6
  7. semi-one Guest

    On 29 Nov 2006 20:37:23 GMT, Bucky Breeder
    <> wrote:

    >semi-one <> wrote in
    >news::
    >
    >> On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 10:21:53 -0700, "richard" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>><> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>>I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    >>>> the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >>>>
    >>>> 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >>>>
    >>>> I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    >>>> see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    >>>> command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    >>>> located although the list command works.
    >>>>
    >>>> Suggestions?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>> Fry Da
    >>>
    >>>Remove the quotes as well as the crap after [said].
    >>>
    >>>31) oh_no_she_said.mp3
    >>>

    >> I'd love to but although explorer "sees" the files, it won't allow any
    >> action to the files. I can't copy them to a folder, rename them to a
    >> different location, etc. As I mentioned, I even tried the copy and
    >> xcopy command from DOS. I can list the files but nothing else.
    >>

    >Where are they right now?


    On the audiobook publisher's mp3 CD.
     
    semi-one, Nov 29, 2006
    #7
  8. semi-one <> wrote in
    news:p:

    > On 29 Nov 2006 20:37:23 GMT, Bucky Breeder
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>semi-one <> wrote in
    >>news::
    >>
    >>> On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 10:21:53 -0700, "richard" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>><> wrote in message
    >>>>news:...
    >>>>>I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    >>>>> the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    >>>>> see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    >>>>> command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    >>>>> located although the list command works.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Suggestions?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>> Fry Da
    >>>>
    >>>>Remove the quotes as well as the crap after [said].
    >>>>
    >>>>31) oh_no_she_said.mp3
    >>>>
    >>> I'd love to but although explorer "sees" the files, it won't allow any
    >>> action to the files. I can't copy them to a folder, rename them to a
    >>> different location, etc. As I mentioned, I even tried the copy and
    >>> xcopy command from DOS. I can list the files but nothing else.
    >>>

    >>Where are they right now?

    >
    > On the audiobook publisher's mp3 CD.
    >


    Just make a folder on C:\"Book" [or whatever] no quotes

    open CD, Explore > Ctrl A > copy them into the folder

    exit the folder, right-click the folder, Properties, untick Read-only, untick
    Hidden if it's ticked, tick Archive > Yes out the Apply to all radio button
    and OK out > open and rename.

    Or, say where it don't work in above procedure.
     
    Bucky Breeder, Nov 29, 2006
    #8
  9. Keme Guest

    skrev:
    > I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    > the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >
    > 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >
    > I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    > see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    > command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    > located although the list command works.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Fry Day


    On the command line, type ...
    dir /x

    That will give a file listing with the "alternate" (=old style "8.3")
    file names where applicable. Hopefully, the files inquestion will have
    an alternate name assigned. Try renaming with the alternate name as
    current name.
     
    Keme, Nov 29, 2006
    #9
  10. semi-one Guest

    On 29 Nov 2006 22:57:09 GMT, Bucky Breeder
    <> wrote:

    >semi-one <> wrote in
    >news:p:
    >
    >> On 29 Nov 2006 20:37:23 GMT, Bucky Breeder
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>semi-one <> wrote in
    >>>news::
    >>>
    >>>> On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 10:21:53 -0700, "richard" <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>><> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:...
    >>>>>>I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    >>>>>> the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    >>>>>> see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    >>>>>> command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    >>>>>> located although the list command works.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Suggestions?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>>> Fry Da
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Remove the quotes as well as the crap after [said].
    >>>>>
    >>>>>31) oh_no_she_said.mp3
    >>>>>
    >>>> I'd love to but although explorer "sees" the files, it won't allow any
    >>>> action to the files. I can't copy them to a folder, rename them to a
    >>>> different location, etc. As I mentioned, I even tried the copy and
    >>>> xcopy command from DOS. I can list the files but nothing else.
    >>>>
    >>>Where are they right now?

    >>
    >> On the audiobook publisher's mp3 CD.
    >>

    >
    >Just make a folder on C:\"Book" [or whatever] no quotes
    >
    >open CD, Explore > Ctrl A > copy them into the folder
    >
    >exit the folder, right-click the folder, Properties, untick Read-only, untick
    >Hidden if it's ticked, tick Archive > Yes out the Apply to all radio button
    >and OK out > open and rename.
    >
    >Or, say where it don't work in above procedure.


    Copying to a folder produces the following error:

    Cannot copy: The file name, directory name or volume label syntax is
    incorrect.
     
    semi-one, Nov 30, 2006
    #10
  11. semi-one Guest

    On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 00:37:56 +0100, Keme <>
    wrote:

    > skrev:
    >> I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    >> the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >>
    >> 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >>
    >> I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    >> see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    >> command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    >> located although the list command works.
    >>
    >> Suggestions?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Fry Day

    >
    >On the command line, type ...
    >dir /x
    >
    >That will give a file listing with the "alternate" (=old style "8.3")
    >file names where applicable. Hopefully, the files inquestion will have
    >an alternate name assigned. Try renaming with the alternate name as
    >current name.


    No, the file names remained the same...
     
    semi-one, Nov 30, 2006
    #11
  12. wrote in news::

    > I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    > the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >
    > 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >
    > I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    > see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    > command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    > located although the list command works.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Fry Day
    >



    If they are mp3's, I think if nothing else using Windows Explorer works,
    you just need a CD ripper. The ripper will beat the protection routine, and
    handle the renaming to something manageable.


    Best wishes to you and yours for a safe and joyous holiday season.

    --

    I wouldn't be a bit surprised if someday some fishermen caught
    a big shark and cut it open, and there inside was a whole person.
    Then they cut the person open, and inside him is a little baby shark.
    And in the baby shark there is not a person, because the baby shark
    would still be too small. But there's a little doll or something,
    like a GI Joe or Barbie little toy person - something like that.
    Then they cut the toy person open, and there's the King Cake Baby Jesus
    doll. Curses! I never get the free drink... Well, there's always next
    year.
     
    Bucky Breeder, Nov 30, 2006
    #12
  13. semi-one Guest

    On 30 Nov 2006 00:26:43 GMT, Bucky Breeder
    <> wrote:

    > wrote in news::
    >
    >> I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    >> the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:
    >>
    >> 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >>
    >> I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows can only
    >> see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with them. Even the
    >> command line rename and copy prompts report that the files can't be
    >> located although the list command works.
    >>
    >> Suggestions?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Fry Day
    >>

    >
    >
    >If they are mp3's, I think if nothing else using Windows Explorer works,
    >you just need a CD ripper. The ripper will beat the protection routine, and
    >handle the renaming to something manageable.
    >
    >
    >Best wishes to you and yours for a safe and joyous holiday season.


    The ripping programs ignore the illegal file names. As an aside,
    trying to load them into Adobe Audition caused the program to crash.

    Thank to all of you for your help but it looks as if I'll need to have
    someone load them on a Mac and rename them there and and burn them for
    me. This was a huge error for a major publisher, HarperCollins, to
    make. I'd much rather have dealt with DRM issues than incidental
    stupidity.

    Regards and Thanks
     
    semi-one, Nov 30, 2006
    #13
  14. Guest

    semi-one <> wrote:

    >Cannot copy: The file name, directory name or volume label syntax is
    >incorrect.


    Then the long way.
    Copy <Org filename> c:\temp\<newfilename>

    My two cents...

    --
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=NfgCLF4ld54
     
    , Nov 30, 2006
    #14
  15. Guest

    wrote:

    > semi-one <> wrote:
    >
    >>Cannot copy: The file name, directory name or volume label syntax is
    >>incorrect.

    >
    >Then the long way.
    >Copy <Org filename> c:\temp\<newfilename>
    >


    If that doesn't work, try

    Copy <"Oh no she*.* "> c:\temp\<newfilename>

    --
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=NfgCLF4ld54
     
    , Nov 30, 2006
    #15
  16. Keme Guest

    semi-one skrev:
    > On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 00:37:56 +0100, Keme <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> skrev:
    >>> I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs. Several of
    >>> the files are named with Illegal characters, for example:

    [...]
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> Fry Day

    >> On the command line, type ...
    >> dir /x
    >>
    >> That will give a file listing with the "alternate" (=old style "8.3")
    >> file names where applicable. Hopefully, the files inquestion will have
    >> an alternate name assigned. Try renaming with the alternate name as
    >> current name.

    >
    > No, the file names remained the same...
    >


    Strange. The old style names (shorter and without special chars) should
    be immediately left of the "full" names. I've done it with names written
    by Apple OS-X too, but maybe your CD was made differently... Can you
    open the files in a player?
     
    Keme, Nov 30, 2006
    #16
  17. dabbed this drivel in
    news::

    > wrote:
    >
    >> semi-one <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Cannot copy: The file name, directory name or volume label syntax is
    >>>incorrect.

    >>
    >>Then the long way.
    >>Copy <Org filename> c:\temp\<newfilename>
    >>

    >
    > If that doesn't work, try
    >
    > Copy <"Oh no she*.* "> c:\temp\<newfilename>



    What the OP forgot to reveal was that the *.mp3's were still on the CD's:

    wrote in
    news::
    >
    > I ordered Michael Crichton's new book, Next, on mp3 CDs.
    > Several of the files are named with Illegal characters,
    > for example:
    >
    > 31 "Oh no she said... ".mp3
    >
    > I assume Apple can handle these with no problem but Windows
    > can only see the files and can't, or won't, do anything with
    > them. Even the command line rename and copy prompts report
    > that the files can't be located although the list command works.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Fry Day
    >



    Because the OP author jumps from he has the CD's to the "illegal character"
    bit, and then on to what Windows can and cannot do - it read like he already
    had them on his harddrive, but just couldn't manipulate them. I don't think
    on any recently released CD's of the entertainment variety you can simply
    copy the files from CD and paste them over to your HDD. I think you need a CD
    ripper to get past the copy protections - even the more simple ones. And then
    he goes on to say that it crashed Adobe, so surely Windows won't diddle the
    DRM. <curses to you steve balmer>

    D'oh! Of course you can't rename a file on a CD. D'oh! D'oh! I see what's
    happening after reading the thread... However it really takes a leap to
    figure what, where, when, why and/or how Apple worked into the scenario.

    There is a process for ripping these files. I had a very similar situation
    with a 2005 Box Scaggs release of 'Fade into Light' - one of those with an
    audio CD side, and a DVD video side.

    It had some *wicked-resilient* copy protection routine built into it, (the
    Virgin Records' release) and it would *not* play in one of my older Lite-On
    CD burners.

    The solution involved mounting it via a virtual CD/DVD, ripping the image,
    then mounting the ripped image, and the app defaulted to the deployed copy-
    protection, with a confirmation dialog, then ripping the image to WAV with
    another copy-protection routine, as I recall, then converting to MP3.

    Windows Explorer (in WinXPpro) resolved the naming convention by substituting
    "-"'s for everything it didn't like when the files exited the image to single
    files in a designated target folder. No big problem - had to run Tag&Rename
    to square away the titles and tags and it pulled details from CDDB OK. It
    *was* a protracted drill! LOL! After all, it's still only "ones" and "zeros",
    ehhh?

    Whoo whee, these authors are really getting persnickedy about their
    "intellectual property" - "ohhhhh, we just have to have some more
    monnnneeyy" - so just imagine for a second and apply *that* to Michael
    Crichton; as if he doesn't have a couple of digital wizards on staff...

    Oh well, it's like they say: "If you have to ask; you can't afford it."
    *~<{:eek:)


    Best wishes to all for a safe and joyous holiday season.

    --

    Most people will never realize
    that large pieces of coral,
    which have been painted brown
    and attached to the skull
    by common wood screws,
    can make children look just like reindeer.
     
    Bucky Breeder, Nov 30, 2006
    #17
  18. Guest

    <snip>
    >>

    >
    >
    >Because the OP author jumps from he has the CD's to the "illegal character"
    >bit, and then on to what Windows can and cannot do - it read like he already
    >had them on his harddrive, but just couldn't manipulate them. I don't think
    >on any recently released CD's of the entertainment variety you can simply
    >copy the files from CD and paste them over to your HDD. I think you need a CD
    >ripper to get past the copy protections - even the more simple ones. And then
    >he goes on to say that it crashed Adobe, so surely Windows won't diddle the
    >DRM. <curses to you steve balmer>
    >
    >D'oh! Of course you can't rename a file on a CD. D'oh! D'oh! I see what's
    >happening after reading the thread... However it really takes a leap to
    >figure what, where, when, why and/or how Apple worked into the scenario.
    >
    >There is a process for ripping these files. I had a very similar situation
    >with a 2005 Box Scaggs release of 'Fade into Light' - one of those with an
    >audio CD side, and a DVD video side.
    >
    >It had some *wicked-resilient* copy protection routine built into it, (the
    >Virgin Records' release) and it would *not* play in one of my older Lite-On
    >CD burners.
    >
    >The solution involved mounting it via a virtual CD/DVD, ripping the image,
    >then mounting the ripped image, and the app defaulted to the deployed copy-
    >protection, with a confirmation dialog, then ripping the image to WAV with
    >another copy-protection routine, as I recall, then converting to MP3.
    >
    >Windows Explorer (in WinXPpro) resolved the naming convention by substituting
    >"-"'s for everything it didn't like when the files exited the image to single
    >files in a designated target folder. No big problem - had to run Tag&Rename
    >to square away the titles and tags and it pulled details from CDDB OK. It
    >*was* a protracted drill! LOL! After all, it's still only "ones" and "zeros",
    >ehhh?
    >
    >Whoo whee, these authors are really getting persnickedy about their
    >"intellectual property" - "ohhhhh, we just have to have some more
    >monnnneeyy" - so just imagine for a second and apply *that* to Michael
    >Crichton; as if he doesn't have a couple of digital wizards on staff...
    >
    >Oh well, it's like they say: "If you have to ask; you can't afford it."
    >*~<{:eek:)
    >
    >
    >Best wishes to all for a safe and joyous holiday season.


    I guess I didn't set out the problem correctly. Just to clear up a
    couple of misunderstandings:

    1. Neither the CDs nor any of the files are copy protected, indeed,
    the major reason I purchase an audiobook mp3 CD instead of the
    standard CD version is to transfer the files to a portable mp3 player
    without ripping. The 2-CDs contain approx 100 mp3 files and only a
    few, about 10 or so, are named with illegal characters. It's these
    files that are the problem. The balance of the files load into iTunes
    for transfer to my iPod just as God and Steve Jobs intended.

    2. Excepting the illegally named files, all are accessable to the
    various audio programs I use to tweak mp3 files, Adobe Audition,
    dBpower AMP, MP3 Gain, etc.

    The problem is, or was (more on the "was" at the end) that the idiots
    at HarperCollins Publishers who produced the mp3 CDs used a Mac to
    create the files and lacking both knowledge of Windows PC-file naming
    standards and the sense to test their work on both platforms, released
    a useless audiobook. At any rate, the problem was not caused by
    Windows or the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, etc.

    Nothing I tried in Windows or from the command prompt would allow the
    files to be renamed or opened so I gave up and gave in and had the
    files correctly renamed on a Mac.

    Again, thanks to all for the suggestions.
     
    , Nov 30, 2006
    #18
  19. Guest

    Bucky Breeder <> wrote:

    >> Copy <"Oh no she*.* "> c:\temp\<newfilename>

    >
    >
    >What the OP forgot to reveal was that the *.mp3's were still on the CD's:


    No he mentioned, the above command is run from the directory on the
    CD, just would take a long time.

    But Keme's short file name (dir /x) and copy *~.* would be much
    simpler.

    --
    http://tinyurl.com/yh7smt
     
    , Nov 30, 2006
    #19
  20. wrote
    in news::

    > <snip>
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>Because the OP author jumps from he has the CD's to the "illegal
    >>character" bit, and then on to what Windows can and cannot do - it read
    >>like he already had them on his harddrive, but just couldn't manipulate
    >>them. I don't think on any recently released CD's of the entertainment
    >>variety you can simply copy the files from CD and paste them over to
    >>your HDD. I think you need a CD ripper to get past the copy protections
    >>- even the more simple ones. And then he goes on to say that it crashed
    >>Adobe, so surely Windows won't diddle the DRM. <curses to you steve
    >>balmer>
    >>
    >>D'oh! Of course you can't rename a file on a CD. D'oh! D'oh! I see
    >>what's happening after reading the thread... However it really takes a
    >>leap to figure what, where, when, why and/or how Apple worked into the
    >>scenario.
    >>
    >>There is a process for ripping these files. I had a very similar
    >>situation with a 2005 Box Scaggs release of 'Fade into Light' - one of
    >>those with an audio CD side, and a DVD video side.
    >>
    >>It had some *wicked-resilient* copy protection routine built into it,
    >>(the Virgin Records' release) and it would *not* play in one of my older
    >>Lite-On CD burners.
    >>
    >>The solution involved mounting it via a virtual CD/DVD, ripping the
    >>image, then mounting the ripped image, and the app defaulted to the
    >>deployed copy- protection, with a confirmation dialog, then ripping the
    >>image to WAV with another copy-protection routine, as I recall, then
    >>converting to MP3.
    >>
    >>Windows Explorer (in WinXPpro) resolved the naming convention by
    >>substituting "-"'s for everything it didn't like when the files exited
    >>the image to single files in a designated target folder. No big problem
    >>- had to run Tag&Rename to square away the titles and tags and it pulled
    >>details from CDDB OK. It *was* a protracted drill! LOL! After all, it's
    >>still only "ones" and "zeros", ehhh?
    >>
    >>Whoo whee, these authors are really getting persnickedy about their
    >>"intellectual property" - "ohhhhh, we just have to have some more
    >>monnnneeyy" - so just imagine for a second and apply *that* to Michael
    >>Crichton; as if he doesn't have a couple of digital wizards on staff...
    >>
    >>Oh well, it's like they say: "If you have to ask; you can't afford it."
    >>*~<{:eek:)
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I guess I didn't set out the problem correctly. Just to clear up a
    > couple of misunderstandings:
    >
    > 1. Neither the CDs nor any of the files are copy protected, indeed,
    > the major reason I purchase an audiobook mp3 CD instead of the
    > standard CD version is to transfer the files to a portable mp3 player
    > without ripping. The 2-CDs contain approx 100 mp3 files and only a
    > few, about 10 or so, are named with illegal characters. It's these
    > files that are the problem. The balance of the files load into iTunes
    > for transfer to my iPod just as God and Steve Jobs intended.
    >
    > 2. Excepting the illegally named files, all are accessable to the
    > various audio programs I use to tweak mp3 files, Adobe Audition,
    > dBpower AMP, MP3 Gain, etc.
    >
    > The problem is, or was (more on the "was" at the end) that the idiots
    > at HarperCollins Publishers who produced the mp3 CDs used a Mac to
    > create the files and lacking both knowledge of Windows PC-file naming
    > standards and the sense to test their work on both platforms, released
    > a useless audiobook. At any rate, the problem was not caused by
    > Windows or the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, etc.
    >
    > Nothing I tried in Windows or from the command prompt would allow the
    > files to be renamed or opened so I gave up and gave in and had the
    > files correctly renamed on a Mac.
    >
    > Again, thanks to all for the suggestions.
    >



    Sincerely, I didn't intend to fault your post, more my reading of the
    situation which you posted. I was just injecting an after-thought into the
    discussion at-large. It's been so long since I dealt with the Boz Scaggs
    deal that I really don't know how I got it done, except to continually slap
    it around with some different apps to which I had access... I guess if it
    were easy, it would not be much use calling it DRM, ehhhh? (-; I hope you
    get it solved.


    Best wishes to all for a safe and joyous holiday season.

    --

    Most people will never realize
    that large pieces of coral,
    which have been painted brown
    and attached to the skull
    by common wood screws,
    can make children look just like reindeer.
     
    Bucky Breeder, Nov 30, 2006
    #20
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