IE's market share

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Voodoo, Jul 13, 2004.

  1. Voodoo

    Voodoo Guest

    I would have thought from reading various articles at paces like
    News.com and DSLreports.com that IE's market share has taken a bit hit
    lately due to all of the recent security problems with that browser,
    and that Mozilla Firefox is the new browser of choice, but lo and
    behold, even after all this Mozilla only has 4.59% of the market, a
    measly figure to be sure. (http://tinyurl.com/3qw7s) And according to
    Websidestory.com, IE still has a 94% market share. It's only down 1%.
    That doesn't seem like a big hit to me. Based on those stats it looks
    to me that IE still rules security problems not withstanding.
    Voodoo, Jul 13, 2004
    #1
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  2. Voodoo wrote:

    > I would have thought from reading various articles at paces like
    > News.com and DSLreports.com that IE's market share has taken a bit hit
    > lately due to all of the recent security problems with that browser,
    > and that Mozilla Firefox is the new browser of choice, but lo and
    > behold, even after all this Mozilla only has 4.59% of the market, a
    > measly figure to be sure. (http://tinyurl.com/3qw7s) And according to
    > Websidestory.com, IE still has a 94% market share. It's only down 1%.
    > That doesn't seem like a big hit to me. Based on those stats it looks
    > to me that IE still rules security problems not withstanding.


    99% of PC users aren't even aware that there *are* other browsers,
    Voodoo.

    Look at how many people still use IE and OE that you see in *tech*
    groups. And Usenet users on the whole `probably only represent 0.000001
    of the world's PC users. They're a blind, lot, most users.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263

    New Pieces of Shakespeare Manuscript Found Near Salt Lake City USA
    Sorry - penguins only: http://snipurl.com/scolius (at blinkynet)
    Blinky the Shark, Jul 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. Voodoo

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Voodoo <> wrote in
    news::

    > I would have thought from reading various articles at paces like
    > News.com and DSLreports.com that IE's market share has taken a bit hit
    > lately due to all of the recent security problems with that browser,
    > and that Mozilla Firefox is the new browser of choice, but lo and
    > behold, even after all this Mozilla only has 4.59% of the market, a
    > measly figure to be sure. (http://tinyurl.com/3qw7s) And according to
    > Websidestory.com, IE still has a 94% market share. It's only down 1%.
    > That doesn't seem like a big hit to me. Based on those stats it looks
    > to me that IE still rules security problems not withstanding.
    >


    In the business/corporate environment, IE is *king* due to it's usage in
    developing Intranet applications in the corporate/business environment.
    With the MS .Net solutions starting to be implemented in the business
    world using IE, IE is going to get even more play, and what the monkey
    sees in the work place, they will use at home. MS is starting to make the
    move to secure IE for home usage starting with XP's SP2 and future O/S(s)
    releases.

    IE is not going anywhere. :)

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Jul 13, 2004
    #3
  4. Voodoo

    Dodo Guest

  5. Voodoo

    Max Guest

    In article <Xns95259D9B3CD8Bnotmenotmecom@63.240.76.16>, Duane Arnold
    <> wrote:

    > In the business/corporate environment, IE is *king* due to it's usage in
    > developing Intranet applications in the corporate/business environment.

    What features do you have in mind?
    What I have seen in such tools requires only a browser -- any browser
    could do any of the functions I know off the top of my head.

    > With the MS .Net solutions starting to be implemented in the business
    > world using IE, IE is going to get even more play,

    ..Net is a whole separate issue, and to my mind the most dangerous and
    horrible concept in the entire industry.

    > and what the monkey
    > sees in the work place, they will use at home. MS is starting to make the
    > move to secure IE for home usage starting with XP's SP2 and future O/S(s)
    > releases.

    Are you kidding? Microsoft is 'starting' to make 'IE secure for home
    usage'? What have they been doing before now? Why wasn't it always
    entirely and perfectly secure?

    > IE is not going anywhere.

    Wasn't his point.
    Max, Jul 14, 2004
    #5
  6. Voodoo

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Max <> wrote in
    news:130720041609402604%:

    > In article <Xns95259D9B3CD8Bnotmenotmecom@63.240.76.16>, Duane Arnold
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> In the business/corporate environment, IE is *king* due to it's usage
    >> in developing Intranet applications in the corporate/business
    >> environment.


    > What features do you have in mind?
    > What I have seen in such tools requires only a browser -- any browser
    > could do any of the functions I know off the top of my head.


    Oh, maybe something like Crystal Report and the Crystal Report Viewer.
    Maybe, the Crystal Enterprise Report Server as well. Oh, maybe like using
    IE to access Web based Intranet solutions on a Citrix Terminal Server
    Farm. You know things like that.

    Don't even think that you can discuss anything with me concerning
    Intranet application development.

    >
    >> With the MS .Net solutions starting to be implemented in the business
    >> world using IE, IE is going to get even more play,

    > .Net is a whole separate issue, and to my mind the most dangerous and
    > horrible concept in the entire industry.


    Yeah right, in the mean time, the push is towards .NET. Why don't you
    take some .Net Training and certification classes which includes many
    security aspects in using the .Net solutions. I already know now that you
    don't have a *clue*.

    >
    >> and what the monkey
    >> sees in the work place, they will use at home. MS is starting to make
    >> the move to secure IE for home usage starting with XP's SP2 and
    >> future O/S(s) releases.


    > Are you kidding? Microsoft is 'starting' to make 'IE secure for home
    > usage'? What have they been doing before now? Why wasn't it always
    > entirely and perfectly secure?


    I must have missed that part about XP's SP 2 and IE. It wouldn't surprise
    me if MS doesn't take it down to Win 2K. As for the rest of the IE
    browsers before 6, hey what can I say?

    >
    >> IE is not going anywhere.

    > Wasn't his point.
    >


    And I don't care about your point either.

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Jul 14, 2004
    #6
  7. Voodoo

    Voodoo Guest

    On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 23:09:58 GMT, Max <> wrote:

    >Are you kidding? Microsoft is 'starting' to make 'IE secure for home
    >usage'? What have they been doing before now? Why wasn't it always
    >entirely and perfectly secure?


    No browser can ever be "entirely and perfectly secure." I suspect that
    in spite of what you just said you know that.
    Voodoo, Jul 14, 2004
    #7
  8. Voodoo

    Sunny Guest

    "Max" <> wrote in message
    news:130720041609402604%...
    <snip>
    > Are you kidding? Microsoft is 'starting' to make 'IE secure for home
    > usage'? What have they been doing before now? Why wasn't it always
    > entirely and perfectly secure?


    The only reason other news readers are more secure, is that the script kiddy
    arseholes can't be bothered, fiddling with applications that don't give a
    big World wide return for their "efforts".
    Sunny, Jul 14, 2004
    #8
  9. Voodoo

    Max Guest

    In article <Xns9525BC75D1A4Enotmenotmecom@216.148.227.77>, Duane Arnold
    <> wrote:

    > > What features do you have in mind?
    > > What I have seen in such tools requires only a browser -- any browser
    > > could do any of the functions I know off the top of my head.

    >
    > Oh, maybe something like Crystal Report and the Crystal Report Viewer.
    > Maybe, the Crystal Enterprise Report Server as well. Oh, maybe like using
    > IE to access Web based Intranet solutions on a Citrix Terminal Server
    > Farm. You know things like that.
    >
    > Don't even think that you can discuss anything with me concerning
    > Intranet application development.


    I wasn't challenging you. I said I didn't know of them, and I was
    asking which applications you had in mind.
    Why do so many people think every response is a personal challenge?

    > >> With the MS .Net solutions starting to be implemented in the business
    > >> world using IE, IE is going to get even more play,

    > > .Net is a whole separate issue, and to my mind the most dangerous and
    > > horrible concept in the entire industry.

    >
    > Yeah right, in the mean time, the push is towards .NET. Why don't you
    > take some .Net Training and certification classes which includes many
    > security aspects in using the .Net solutions. I already know now that you
    > don't have a *clue*.


    Again, you misinterpret.
    I am not writing about the lack of security protocols and the options
    for building applications under the .Net project.
    I am writing about the foolishness of engaging in a project whose
    purpose is to build onto Microsoft's control of others. It isn't
    necessary. It isn't wise. It will not help users.
    Sure, there's a big push toward .Net -- it's coming from Microsoft and
    the companies they have engaged as partners. It will employ many and
    make a few rich. That doesn't make it a good idea.
    Max, Jul 15, 2004
    #9
  10. Voodoo

    Max Guest

    In article <>, Voodoo
    <> wrote:

    > On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 23:09:58 GMT, Max <> wrote:
    >
    > >Are you kidding? Microsoft is 'starting' to make 'IE secure for home
    > >usage'? What have they been doing before now? Why wasn't it always
    > >entirely and perfectly secure?

    >
    > No browser can ever be "entirely and perfectly secure." I suspect that
    > in spite of what you just said you know that.


    No -- why can't it?
    I am not saying a browser has to manage all port traffic. But can't a
    browser simply load and display HTML content (data) without allowing
    any programs to load on the user's end? Can't they refuse to allow any
    access to the hard drive's content? Can't the browser operate without
    sending out any information about the user?
    Just because those things have become accepted today doesn't mean they
    are necessary, right?
    Or am I missing something a browser does that is inherently un-secure?
    Max, Jul 15, 2004
    #10
  11. Voodoo

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Max <> wrote in
    news:150720040031149535%:

    > In article <Xns9525BC75D1A4Enotmenotmecom@216.148.227.77>, Duane
    > Arnold <> wrote:
    >
    >> > What features do you have in mind?
    >> > What I have seen in such tools requires only a browser -- any
    >> > browser could do any of the functions I know off the top of my
    >> > head.

    >>
    >> Oh, maybe something like Crystal Report and the Crystal Report
    >> Viewer. Maybe, the Crystal Enterprise Report Server as well. Oh,
    >> maybe like using IE to access Web based Intranet solutions on a
    >> Citrix Terminal Server Farm. You know things like that.
    >>
    >> Don't even think that you can discuss anything with me concerning
    >> Intranet application development.

    >
    > I wasn't challenging you. I said I didn't know of them, and I was
    > asking which applications you had in mind.
    > Why do so many people think every response is a personal challenge?


    Well, that's based on some young *clowns* that are always running around
    loose on the Internet that seem to pop-up. You have my apology.

    >
    >> >> With the MS .Net solutions starting to be implemented in the
    >> >> business world using IE, IE is going to get even more play,
    >> > .Net is a whole separate issue, and to my mind the most dangerous
    >> > and horrible concept in the entire industry.

    >>
    >> Yeah right, in the mean time, the push is towards .NET. Why don't you
    >> take some .Net Training and certification classes which includes many
    >> security aspects in using the .Net solutions. I already know now that
    >> you don't have a *clue*.

    >
    > Again, you misinterpret.
    > I am not writing about the lack of security protocols and the options
    > for building applications under the .Net project.
    > I am writing about the foolishness of engaging in a project whose
    > purpose is to build onto Microsoft's control of others. It isn't
    > necessary. It isn't wise. It will not help users.
    > Sure, there's a big push toward .Net -- it's coming from Microsoft and
    > the companies they have engaged as partners. It will employ many and
    > make a few rich. That doesn't make it a good idea.
    >


    Point blank, if you don't understand the need to do distributed
    centralized processing in a business environment, then you don't
    understand it. It's not about your mis interpretation of what the .Net
    solution is about and some ridiculous control by the *evil* MS empire as
    you see it. The need to do centralize processing is the need in cutting
    the cost of things such as maintaining software on all workstations in a
    business/corporate environment of said software in a solution; to bring
    robust and powerful Web based Intranet solutions to the
    business/corporate environment, which now can be done by even a novice
    programmer.

    It's the marriage of the browser (for a lack of better words) technology
    with more powerful programming tools like VB, C#, and C++ to cut cost or
    cut Total Cost Of ownership of applications running on the MS platform.
    And frankly speaking, the browser technology with HTML, JavaScript, ASP
    script ect ect is/was limited and weak as in how it could be used to
    produce business solutions. As a matter of fact and this is speaking from
    my experience, the technology couldn't even match the CICS technology on
    the IBM mainframes and how CICS is/was able to produce powerful business
    solution with COBOL, Assembler or PLI. And I am not talking about doing
    the little pretty picture being displayed and point and click BS on the
    screens either. The technology isis not anymore and the gap between the
    browser, powerful and rich programming languages and tools that were
    lacking can now be used to produce powerful and robust Web based
    solutions for Intranet or Internet.

    That's my take on it in developing and implementing programming business
    solutions using the mainframe and client server technology in my 30 years
    plus in being in the business.

    As far as what is or will happen with the .Net Technology in the home
    environment, again and frankly speaking, I don't give a damn as it has
    never put in $$$ in my pockets.

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Jul 15, 2004
    #11
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