Identity Theft Protection (a method)

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Brad, Sep 11, 2005.

  1. Brad

    Brad Guest

    Hi,

    There is no doubt that key loggers (capture your keystrokes) in spyware is
    part of the massive identity theft problem. Some key loggers can send a file
    that contains what you typed over the internet without your knowledge.

    Many of us like to keep personal information, which includes bank
    accounts, etc. in some form on our computers. Although it may be encrypted
    for security, the problem is when you type an account number, password, etc.

    Well for me, I don't worry about any spyware since I can use Dos mode
    (not Dos "prompt") . There are tons of Dos based software, such as editors,
    etc. available from such sources as www.simtel.net. Note: I use a Dos
    based editor and keep my personal information on a floppy disk.

    I have Windows 98 computers. Unfortunately, you can't do this with XP.

    I edited "MSDOS.SYS". It is a hidden, read only, system file located at
    the root directory (C:\). At the Dos "prompt". I used this command at the
    root directory:

    "ATTRIB -H -R -S MSDOS.SYS" to allow access to that file.

    Since "MSDOS.SYS" is a text file, I used a text editor and changed
    "BootGUI = 1" to "BootGUI = 0".

    Afterwards, I restored the attributes:

    "ATTRIB +H +R +S MSDOS.SYS".

    From now on, my computer boots into Dos mode (Windows isn't launched yet)
    where there is no chance of launching a key logger. Now I can edit my
    personal file in complete safety. When I am finished, I simply type "WIN"
    (and press Enter) to launch Windows.

    Brad
     
    Brad, Sep 11, 2005
    #1
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  2. Brad

    Vanguard Guest

    "Brad" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    <snip>
    > From now on, my computer boots into Dos mode (Windows isn't launched
    > yet)
    > where there is no chance of launching a key logger.


    Unless, of course, the keylogger is a DOS virus, boot sector virus, or
    root kit that replaced or modified your DOS kernel and/or command
    interpreter. Or it is a hardware keylogger (dongle) attached to your
    keyboard (inline with the cable or a modified motherboard) that couldn't
    give a gnat's fart about which OS you load. Or the keylogger is a
    traffic monitor (packet sniffer) upstream of your host that couldn't
    care less about what you hit on the keyboard since it really just wants
    the data in your unencrypted traffic. Or, like the CIA, uses the
    differing EMF produced by the different keys on your keyboard to tell
    which one and in which order you hit them (and you don't even have to be
    sitting near a window anymore).
     
    Vanguard, Sep 11, 2005
    #2
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  3. Brad

    Beachcomber Guest

    On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 09:11:21 -0500, "Vanguard"
    <> wrote:

    >"Brad" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    ><snip>
    >> From now on, my computer boots into Dos mode (Windows isn't launched
    >> yet)
    >> where there is no chance of launching a key logger.

    >
    >Unless, of course, the keylogger is a DOS virus, boot sector virus, or
    >root kit that replaced or modified your DOS kernel and/or command
    >interpreter. Or it is a hardware keylogger (dongle) attached to your
    >keyboard (inline with the cable or a modified motherboard) that couldn't
    >give a gnat's fart about which OS you load. Or the keylogger is a
    >traffic monitor (packet sniffer) upstream of your host that couldn't
    >care less about what you hit on the keyboard since it really just wants
    >the data in your unencrypted traffic. Or, like the CIA, uses the
    >differing EMF produced by the different keys on your keyboard to tell
    >which one and in which order you hit them (and you don't even have to be
    >sitting near a window anymore).
    >


    Does anyone know where an individual could purchase one of the CIA
    style EMF keystroke loggers?

    It seems that the hardware dongle on the keyboard cable is too
    obviously succeptable to detection if the targeted individual is
    really looking for it. (example: clever teenagers)

    Also, it is not always easy to install a keystroke logger program if
    the computer is physically secured from outsiders or there is
    extensive password protection on the bootup cycle.

    Beachcomber
     
    Beachcomber, Sep 11, 2005
    #3
  4. Brad

    Notan Guest

    Beachcomber wrote:
    >
    > On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 09:11:21 -0500, "Vanguard"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >"Brad" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > ><snip>
    > >> From now on, my computer boots into Dos mode (Windows isn't launched
    > >> yet)
    > >> where there is no chance of launching a key logger.

    > >
    > >Unless, of course, the keylogger is a DOS virus, boot sector virus, or
    > >root kit that replaced or modified your DOS kernel and/or command
    > >interpreter. Or it is a hardware keylogger (dongle) attached to your
    > >keyboard (inline with the cable or a modified motherboard) that couldn't
    > >give a gnat's fart about which OS you load. Or the keylogger is a
    > >traffic monitor (packet sniffer) upstream of your host that couldn't
    > >care less about what you hit on the keyboard since it really just wants
    > >the data in your unencrypted traffic. Or, like the CIA, uses the
    > >differing EMF produced by the different keys on your keyboard to tell
    > >which one and in which order you hit them (and you don't even have to be
    > >sitting near a window anymore).
    > >

    >
    > Does anyone know where an individual could purchase one of the CIA
    > style EMF keystroke loggers?
    >
    > It seems that the hardware dongle on the keyboard cable is too
    > obviously succeptable to detection if the targeted individual is
    > really looking for it. (example: clever teenagers)
    >
    > Also, it is not always easy to install a keystroke logger program if
    > the computer is physically secured from outsiders or there is
    > extensive password protection on the bootup cycle.


    Who are you trying to steal keystrokes from?

    Notan
     
    Notan, Sep 11, 2005
    #4
  5. Brad

    Beachcomber Guest


    >>
    >> Does anyone know where an individual could purchase one of the CIA
    >> style EMF keystroke loggers?
    >>
    >> It seems that the hardware dongle on the keyboard cable is too
    >> obviously succeptable to detection if the targeted individual is
    >> really looking for it. (example: clever teenagers)
    >>
    >> Also, it is not always easy to install a keystroke logger program if
    >> the computer is physically secured from outsiders or there is
    >> extensive password protection on the bootup cycle.

    >
    >Who are you trying to steal keystrokes from?
    >
    >Notan


    Client has a spouse who is suspected of cheating on them. I'm just
    the investigator and consultant.

    Beachcomber
     
    Beachcomber, Sep 11, 2005
    #5
  6. Brad

    Unruh Guest

    (Beachcomber) writes:

    >On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 09:11:21 -0500, "Vanguard"
    ><> wrote:


    >>"Brad" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >><snip>
    >>> From now on, my computer boots into Dos mode (Windows isn't launched
    >>> yet)
    >>> where there is no chance of launching a key logger.

    >>
    >>Unless, of course, the keylogger is a DOS virus, boot sector virus, or
    >>root kit that replaced or modified your DOS kernel and/or command
    >>interpreter. Or it is a hardware keylogger (dongle) attached to your
    >>keyboard (inline with the cable or a modified motherboard) that couldn't
    >>give a gnat's fart about which OS you load. Or the keylogger is a
    >>traffic monitor (packet sniffer) upstream of your host that couldn't
    >>care less about what you hit on the keyboard since it really just wants
    >>the data in your unencrypted traffic. Or, like the CIA, uses the
    >>differing EMF produced by the different keys on your keyboard to tell
    >>which one and in which order you hit them (and you don't even have to be
    >>sitting near a window anymore).
    >>


    >Does anyone know where an individual could purchase one of the CIA
    >style EMF keystroke loggers?


    Call the cia and ask them:)



    >It seems that the hardware dongle on the keyboard cable is too
    >obviously succeptable to detection if the targeted individual is
    >really looking for it. (example: clever teenagers)


    You would put it into the keyboard. Very few people, especially teenagers,
    take apart their keyboard to look inside.



    >Also, it is not always easy to install a keystroke logger program if
    >the computer is physically secured from outsiders or there is
    >extensive password protection on the bootup cycle.


    Who said easy? And who does extensive password protection on the bootup
    cycle? The OP said he was running windows most of the time, and has that
    computer on the net. It is trivial to break into and then trivial to go to
    any part of the disk to install whatever is wanted into the dos partition.
    Ie, his computer is NOT secure from outsiders, by admission.



    >Beachcomber
     
    Unruh, Sep 11, 2005
    #6
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