ID RAM Speed

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Crimson*, Nov 12, 2003.

  1. Crimson*

    Crimson* Guest

    Does anyone know of a quick & easy program to ID the speed of your RAM (i.e.
    PC133, 100, etc.)?
    Crimson*, Nov 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. Crimson*

    Thor Guest

    look for a program called "aida32".



    ...
    "Crimson*" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Does anyone know of a quick & easy program to ID the speed of your RAM

    (i.e.
    > PC133, 100, etc.)?
    >
    >
    Thor, Nov 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. Does that identify the speed the RAM is rated for or the speed at which
    it's running? E.g. to drop back a couple years when RAM speeds were
    easily understandable, if I pop some PC133 RAM into a PC100 mobo the RAM
    will run at 100MHz. Will aida32 identify it as PC133 RAM or PC100?

    Thor wrote:
    > look for a program called "aida32".
    >
    >
    >
    > ..
    > "Crimson*" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Does anyone know of a quick & easy program to ID the speed of your RAM

    >
    > (i.e.
    >
    >>PC133, 100, etc.)?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    Calvin Crumrine, Nov 12, 2003
    #3
  4. Crimson*

    DeMoN LaG Guest

    Calvin Crumrine <> wrote in
    news::

    > Does that identify the speed the RAM is rated for or the speed at which
    > it's running? E.g. to drop back a couple years when RAM speeds were
    > easily understandable, if I pop some PC133 RAM into a PC100 mobo the RAM
    > will run at 100MHz. Will aida32 identify it as PC133 RAM or PC100?
    >


    It will give both, it will tell you the speed the memory bus is running at,
    as well as ID each module and give you information about it

    --
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    DeMoN LaG, Nov 12, 2003
    #4
  5. DeMoN LaG wrote:
    > Calvin Crumrine <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >
    >>Does that identify the speed the RAM is rated for or the speed at which
    >>it's running? E.g. to drop back a couple years when RAM speeds were
    >>easily understandable, if I pop some PC133 RAM into a PC100 mobo the RAM
    >>will run at 100MHz. Will aida32 identify it as PC133 RAM or PC100?
    >>

    >
    >
    > It will give both, it will tell you the speed the memory bus is running at,
    > as well as ID each module and give you information about it
    >

    Hmmm, ID each module? Does that imply that RAM modules contain
    'firmware' that identifies their capabilities? I suppose that's in
    conformance with PnP but it flies in the face of what I'd understood
    about RAM, that it ran (or attempted to run) according to the settings
    on the mobo rather than according to anything 'internal' to it.

    Oh well, the world is the way it is whether I understand it or not.

    Thanks. Sounds like a useful utility.
    Calvin Crumrine, Nov 12, 2003
    #5
  6. Crimson*

    Night_Seer Guest

    Calvin Crumrine wrote:
    > DeMoN LaG wrote:
    >> Calvin Crumrine <> wrote in
    >> news::
    >>
    >>
    >>> Does that identify the speed the RAM is rated for or the speed at
    >>> which it's running? E.g. to drop back a couple years when RAM
    >>> speeds were easily understandable, if I pop some PC133 RAM into a
    >>> PC100 mobo the RAM will run at 100MHz. Will aida32 identify it as
    >>> PC133 RAM or PC100?
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> It will give both, it will tell you the speed the memory bus is
    >> running at, as well as ID each module and give you information about
    >> it
    >>

    > Hmmm, ID each module? Does that imply that RAM modules contain
    > 'firmware' that identifies their capabilities? I suppose that's in
    > conformance with PnP but it flies in the face of what I'd understood
    > about RAM, that it ran (or attempted to run) according to the settings
    > on the mobo rather than according to anything 'internal' to it.
    >
    > Oh well, the world is the way it is whether I understand it or not.
    >
    > Thanks. Sounds like a useful utility.


    Don't they have something on their to be able to be run in SPD by the
    motherboard (as in detect settings from RAM module)

    --
    Night_Seer
    Night_Seer, Nov 13, 2003
    #6
  7. Crimson*

    Thor Guest


    > Hmmm, ID each module? Does that imply that RAM modules contain
    > 'firmware' that identifies their capabilities? I suppose that's in
    > conformance with PnP but it flies in the face of what I'd understood
    > about RAM, that it ran (or attempted to run) according to the settings
    > on the mobo rather than according to anything 'internal' to it.


    Since PC-100, all modules should have an "SPD" chip on the module, which
    stores all the particulars of the module, and it's operating parameters. The
    section with this info in Aida32 is called "SPD". The RAM does indeed take
    it's operational mode from the motherboard, but the SPD chip is there to
    tell the motherboard how to set up the timings automatically. Most current
    chipsets support indepentently clocking the memory, so the board usually has
    an "auto" setting that can set up the memory bus speed, and/or the timings
    according to the information found on the SPD chip.
    Thor, Nov 13, 2003
    #7
  8. Thor wrote:
    >>Hmmm, ID each module? Does that imply that RAM modules contain
    >>'firmware' that identifies their capabilities? I suppose that's in
    >>conformance with PnP but it flies in the face of what I'd understood
    >>about RAM, that it ran (or attempted to run) according to the settings
    >>on the mobo rather than according to anything 'internal' to it.

    >
    >
    > Since PC-100, all modules should have an "SPD" chip on the module, which
    > stores all the particulars of the module, and it's operating parameters. The
    > section with this info in Aida32 is called "SPD". The RAM does indeed take
    > it's operational mode from the motherboard, but the SPD chip is there to
    > tell the motherboard how to set up the timings automatically. Most current
    > chipsets support indepentently clocking the memory, so the board usually has
    > an "auto" setting that can set up the memory bus speed, and/or the timings
    > according to the information found on the SPD chip.
    >
    >

    OK, so the RAM tells the mobo how to run it & then the mobo tells the
    RAM how it will run. Sounds complicated & redundant to me, but what do I
    know? Just enough to not monkey with something that works.
    Calvin Crumrine, Nov 13, 2003
    #8
  9. Crimson*

    Thor Guest


    > OK, so the RAM tells the mobo how to run it & then the mobo tells the
    > RAM how it will run. Sounds complicated & redundant to me, but what do I
    > know? Just enough to not monkey with something that works.


    The reason is that tt's cheaper, and easier, and far simpler to manufacturer
    essentially a "dumb" module that has a small chip defining it's overall
    capability to the motherboard, than to design and manufacture each and every
    module with it's own controlling logic circuitry to manage all memory
    operations.
    Thor, Nov 13, 2003
    #9
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