ICC Profile - Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX9

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by leuj, May 24, 2006.

  1. leuj

    leuj Guest

    Hello,

    I'm looking for the icc profile of my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX9
    to work with Photoshop.

    Where can I get that ?

    Thank's
    leuj, May 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. leuj

    Bill Hilton Guest

    > leuj writes ...
    >
    >I'm looking for the icc profile of my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX9
    >to work with Photoshop.
    >Where can I get that ?


    An ICC profile is worthless for a digital camera unless you have
    generated one specifically for a single fixed light source. That's why
    they basically don't exist unless you are doing something like fashion
    or product photography using lights with the identical set-up every
    day. Then you would generate one to use with your RAW converter, but
    for most of us this is not the case.

    How were you planning on using this profile?

    Bill
    Bill Hilton, May 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. leuj

    D Mac Guest

    leuj wrote:
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> I'm looking for the icc profile of my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX9
    >> to work with Photoshop.
    >>
    >> Where can I get that ?
    >>
    >> Thank's


    Panasonic cameras use sRGB profile as do nearly all P&S digital cameras.
    Unless you have a particular need to supply pictures to commercial printers,
    you should only work in sRGB mode in Photoshop with these type of images.

    You'll find that nearly all photo quality inkjet printers produce very good
    to excellent results from Photoshop after editing your photos with this
    profile if you use "print with preview" and choose "same as source" for the
    print space profile. You can then rely on the paper selection of your
    printer to obtain the colour you see on the screen... Provided you have that
    screen balanced for colour. There are a plethora of free programs around to
    do that with.

    Douglas
    D Mac, May 24, 2006
    #3
  4. leuj

    leuj Guest

    Thank's for the answers.

    When you say sRGB, is it the "sRGB IEC1966-2.1" that I have in
    Photoshop ?
    If understand, you recommend using the sRGB as the working RGB with
    Photoshop
    but I've seen elsewhere that they recommend "Adobe RGB (1998)". What
    is the difference ?

    I'm printing my photos thru an internet photo printing provider that
    gave me his icc profile.
    When I want to do a prewiew I use the menu "View | Proof Setup |
    Custom" and I
    chose his icc profile. Is it OK ?

    Gilles
    leuj, May 24, 2006
    #4
  5. leuj

    leuj Guest

    Another question

    I'm using a scanner for 35 mm color films. It is an Epson and I have
    his icc profile.
    Should I convert to sRGB also when working in Photoshop ?

    Gilles
    leuj, May 24, 2006
    #5
  6. leuj

    Bill Hilton Guest

    > leuj writes ...
    >
    >When you say sRGB, is it the "sRGB IEC1966-2.1" that I have
    >in Photoshop ?


    Yes, that's the current version of sRGB ... note it's not what you
    asked for, "the icc profile of my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX9" but rather
    an abstract "working space" profile used for editing, which is
    different from a "device-specific" profile.

    > If understand, you (Douglas) recommend using the sRGB as the working
    > RGB with Photoshop but I've seen elsewhere that they recommend "Adobe
    > RGB (1998)". What is the difference ?


    AdobeRGB has a wider gamut or range of colors and is typically used for
    people printing on high-end printers making larger prints. sRGB has a
    smaller gamut and is used for web images and most of the quickie
    printers. Your camera has a wider gamut than sRGB so you are throwing
    away some colors, but given where you are printing you probably won't
    notice a difference if you decide to make two prints, one edited in
    sRGB and one in AdobeRGB.

    >I'm printing my photos thru an internet photo printing provider that
    >gave me his icc profile.
    >When I want to do a prewiew I use the menu "View | Proof Setup |
    >Custom" and I chose his icc profile. Is it OK ?


    Yes, this is called "soft proofing" and you are doing it right, though
    you might ask what they suggest for 'rendering intent' (either Relative
    Col or Perceptual), this could make a difference in how you see it on
    the screen. Also enabling 'simulate: paper white' will dull it down a
    lot, more like you see on paper vs on a backlit monitor. Basically if
    their profile is accurate (not a certainty) and if your monitor ICC
    profile is very accurate (likewise not a certainty) then you will get a
    pretty good preview of what the print should look like.

    This article explains soft proofing pretty well ...
    http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/10150.html?origin=story

    Bill
    Bill Hilton, May 25, 2006
    #6
  7. leuj

    D Mac Guest

    leuj wrote:
    >> Another question
    >>
    >> I'm using a scanner for 35 mm color films. It is an Epson and I have
    >> his icc profile.
    >> Should I convert to sRGB also when working in Photoshop ?
    >>
    >> Gilles



    sRGB IEC1966-2.1 is just the version of the standard in use by Adobe. There
    are plenty more RGB standards but for simplification, stick with sRGB. The
    profile; Adobe RGB is a wide gamut profile used by commercial printers and
    magazine publishers. It displays more variation in colours but at the
    expense of a dull looking image. If the camera takes sRGB, it is a moot
    point to convert it to a standard wider than that unless you have a need for
    specific gamut past what sRGB produces. You know, most photo labs using Fuji
    equipment, convert any file you give them to sRGB in order to print it.

    The profile supplied by your photo printer is peculiar to his particular
    printer. When I need to provide a file with a peculiar ICC profile, I apply
    it to the image after it is edited in sRGB. Sometimes this results in the
    image looking off colour on your screen but the photos come back looking
    right.

    Epson scanners (the ones I've owned) all use sRGB by default.

    Douglas
    D Mac, May 25, 2006
    #7
  8. D Mac wrote:

    > Panasonic cameras use sRGB profile as do nearly all P&S digital cameras.


    This is not strictly true. Cameras embed the sRGB profile and present
    RGB numbers relative to that gamut, but that is not the profile of
    the camera device itself.
    Michael Sierchio, May 25, 2006
    #8
  9. Michael Sierchio wrote:
    > D Mac wrote:
    >
    >> Panasonic cameras use sRGB profile as do nearly all P&S digital cameras.

    >
    > This is not strictly true. Cameras embed the sRGB profile and present
    > RGB numbers relative to that gamut, but that is not the profile of
    > the camera device itself.


    Sorry, that slipped away before I could summarize as:

    distinguish between profile and working space.

    TYVM.
    Michael Sierchio, May 25, 2006
    #9
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