i386, i586, i686

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Jax, Dec 30, 2003.

  1. Jax

    Jax Guest

    hmm i should know this....

    what architectures do the above refer to?

    thx
    Jax, Dec 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. Jax

    Io Guest

    Jax wrote:

    > hmm i should know this....
    >
    > what architectures do the above refer to?
    >
    > thx


    i386 = Intel 386 32bit IA-32 architecture (PC CPUs basically)
    i586 = Intel Pentium
    i686 = Intel Pentium Pro & various marketing rebrandings (such as the
    Pentium II)
    Io, Dec 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. Jax

    Jay Guest

    Jax wrote:

    > hmm i should know this....
    >
    > what architectures do the above refer to?
    >
    > thx


    Crazy Intel Architecture (aka CIA).
    Jay, Dec 30, 2003
    #3
  4. Hi there,

    Jax wrote:
    > hmm i should know this....
    >
    > what architectures do the above refer to?
    >
    > thx


    Generally speaking...

    i386 refers to Intel 80386 CPU's (and clones)

    i586 refers to Intel Pentium I's (and clones)

    i686 refers to Pentium II/III/IV etc...

    There is also i486 for Intel 80486 and clones...

    My AMD Athlon XP 2500+ is recognised as an i686...

    --
    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Remove spamblocker to send replies direct to my email...
    Chris Wilkinson, Dec 30, 2003
    #4
  5. Jax

    The Flash Guest

    "Jax" <> wrote in message
    news:3ff16cd9$0$13347$...
    > hmm i should know this....
    >
    > what architectures do the above refer to?
    >
    > thx


    The use of such acronms can be missleading.

    The are refering to instruction sets (operational codes that a class of
    processor can decode and execute and data strings that can be processed)

    i386 code set was the first to allow useful 32 bit addressing and thus
    allowed large memory,
    Techniacally if a processor claims i386 compatibility it can either execute
    any Intel 386 instruction or emulate said instruction and apear to be an
    Intel 386 CPu even if it is a Cyrix or AMD.

    Intel never used i586 or i686 these were made up by other companies as Intel
    used 'Pentium' after the 486 (you could not register a number as a
    trademark, only a word at that time and thus Pentium is a registed trademark
    of Intel)

    After the i486 extensions to the i386 instruction set things got very muddy.

    All the chip makers did there own things and dreamed up weird names and
    strange names for the new and wonderful instructions that their CPU's could
    execute.

    AMD came up with multimedia instructions for its K6 CPU's, Intel had its own
    which it called MMX, Cyrix just ignored them anc called its CPU '6x86'

    If a CPU is identifed as a i686 one must still be very careful as its true
    capabilites can very from that of a fast 486 (VIA winchip) to have 4
    megabyte paging extended memory addressing and multimedia extensions (Athlon
    or P3 etc)

    i586 is almost redundant it was used by makers whos CPUS's did not support
    the entire Pentium instruction set. These were the like of 5x86 overdrivers
    for 486 based computers.
    The Flash, Dec 30, 2003
    #5
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