i386 folder delete it?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Billh, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. Billh

    Billh Guest

    I have some Dell computers at work that I want to image and get the
    image under 4 gigs as my imagecast program does not play well with over
    4 gig files.

    Fact in the c drive there is a folder called i386

    Second fact if you install XP SP2 in the Windows folder there is a
    service pack folder called i386 of about the same size.

    Third fact if you format the hard drive and using the windows install cd
    from Dell no I386 fold is created on the c drive.

    Question can I delete the i386 folder in the c drive safely?

    These computers are in a lab and hardware is not added to them often if
    at all. And if hardware is added it is done by me and I have the xp cd
    any ways.
     
    Billh, Mar 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. Billh

    JANA Guest

    If you want to make a lot of problems in your system, go and delete it. I
    think you should go back for some retraining!

    --

    JANA
    _____


    "Billh" <> wrote in message
    news:44286f50$0$17610$...
    I have some Dell computers at work that I want to image and get the
    image under 4 gigs as my imagecast program does not play well with over
    4 gig files.

    Fact in the c drive there is a folder called i386

    Second fact if you install XP SP2 in the Windows folder there is a
    service pack folder called i386 of about the same size.

    Third fact if you format the hard drive and using the windows install cd
    from Dell no I386 fold is created on the c drive.

    Question can I delete the i386 folder in the c drive safely?

    These computers are in a lab and hardware is not added to them often if
    at all. And if hardware is added it is done by me and I have the xp cd
    any ways.
     
    JANA, Mar 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. Billh

    VICIBICI Guest

    there are many ways of getting image under 4 gb. but deleting the i386 is
    not included in that. before creating image reduce the image size by getting
    rid of unnecessary programs, turn of system restore, disk clean up, defrag.
    Standard desktop SOEs do not exceed 4gb most of the time.
    You can use imaging program like Norton Ghost .

    Sam Duru www.teknohelp.com.au Mobile: 0412724307
    "Billh" <> wrote in message
    news:44286f50$0$17610$...
    >I have some Dell computers at work that I want to image and get the image
    >under 4 gigs as my imagecast program does not play well with over 4 gig
    >files.
    >
    > Fact in the c drive there is a folder called i386
    >
    > Second fact if you install XP SP2 in the Windows folder there is a service
    > pack folder called i386 of about the same size.
    >
    > Third fact if you format the hard drive and using the windows install cd
    > from Dell no I386 fold is created on the c drive.
    >
    > Question can I delete the i386 folder in the c drive safely?
    >
    > These computers are in a lab and hardware is not added to them often if at
    > all. And if hardware is added it is done by me and I have the xp cd any
    > ways.
     
    VICIBICI, Mar 28, 2006
    #3
  4. Billh

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Mon, 27 Mar 2006 18:25:36 -0500, "JANA" <> wrote:

    >If you want to make a lot of problems in your system, go and delete it. I
    >think you should go back for some retraining!


    I think YOU should go back for some 'retraining' and let the people
    who know what they're talking about give the answers.

    Yes, i386 can be deleted.
     
    Evan Platt, Mar 28, 2006
    #4
  5. Billh

    Billh Guest

    VICIBICI wrote:
    > there are many ways of getting image under 4 gb. but deleting the i386 is
    > not included in that. before creating image reduce the image size by getting
    > rid of unnecessary programs, turn of system restore, disk clean up, defrag.
    > Standard desktop SOEs do not exceed 4gb most of the time.
    > You can use imaging program like Norton Ghost .
    >
    > Sam Duru www.teknohelp.com.au Mobile: 0412724307
    > "Billh" <> wrote in message
    > news:44286f50$0$17610$...
    >> I have some Dell computers at work that I want to image and get the image
    >> under 4 gigs as my imagecast program does not play well with over 4 gig
    >> files.
    >>
    >> Fact in the c drive there is a folder called i386
    >>
    >> Second fact if you install XP SP2 in the Windows folder there is a service
    >> pack folder called i386 of about the same size.
    >>
    >> Third fact if you format the hard drive and using the windows install cd
    >> from Dell no I386 fold is created on the c drive.
    >>
    >> Question can I delete the i386 folder in the c drive safely?
    >>
    >> These computers are in a lab and hardware is not added to them often if at
    >> all. And if hardware is added it is done by me and I have the xp cd any
    >> ways.

    >
    >

    These labs have lots of programs on them thus the reason they can go
    over 4 gigs. I do clear system restore and even boot up with Bart PE
    and delete the pagefile and all profiles before I do the image. I was
    able to get it down to 3.99! But I know if I add even more I item I
    will be over.

    Ghost is a good idea but I am stuck with Image cast.
     
    Billh, Mar 28, 2006
    #5
  6. Billh

    rancid de Guest

    "Billh" <> wrote in message
    news:44286f50$0$17610$...
    >I have some Dell computers at work that I want to image and get the image
    >under 4 gigs as my imagecast program does not play well with over 4 gig
    >files.
    >
    > Fact in the c drive there is a folder called i386
    >
    > Second fact if you install XP SP2 in the Windows folder there is a service
    > pack folder called i386 of about the same size.
    >
    > Third fact if you format the hard drive and using the windows install cd
    > from Dell no I386 fold is created on the c drive.
    >
    > Question can I delete the i386 folder in the c drive safely?
    >
    > These computers are in a lab and hardware is not added to them often if at
    > all. And if hardware is added it is done by me and I have the xp cd any
    > ways.


    http://www.netbsd.org/Ports/i386/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I386
     
    rancid de, Mar 28, 2006
    #6
  7. Billh

    Billh Guest

    JANA wrote:
    > If you want to make a lot of problems in your system, go and delete it. I
    > think you should go back for some retraining!
    >

    I am self taught by reading books websites and newsgroups and just doing
    it. So in a way I am getting retrained by reading your post. As no one
    can know everything this is why I asked the question.

    So what problems will I have. As I said if I use an oem build it has it
    but if I format and do a clean install it is not there so what defect is
    in my clean install?
     
    Billh, Mar 28, 2006
    #7
  8. Billh

    Plato Guest

    Plato, Mar 28, 2006
    #8
  9. Billh

    Billh Guest

    If it is good design then when you do a clean install of Windows why did
    Microsoft not put the folder there.


    Plato wrote:
    > Billh wrote:
    >> Fact in the c drive there is a folder called i386

    >
    > Good design.
    >
    >
     
    Billh, Mar 28, 2006
    #9
  10. Billh

    Evan Platt Guest

    Re: Swollen anus and constant gas!!

    Evan Platt <> wrote in message
    <>...

    > If all else fails, I throw up.
     
    Evan Platt, Mar 28, 2006
    #10
  11. Billh

    greg Guest

    The i386 is basically the main install folder that windows uses for
    install. the folder is on the windows cd and can always be referenced when
    a piece of hardware or software is installed and a file is needed from that
    folder. The reason companies like dell and other companies put it on your
    root drive is they no longer give you a copy of windows(although i think
    dell still does). they usually give you a sort of image of their software
    package usually spanning 3-6 cd's or a hidden partition. Therefore by
    putting the i386 folder on the root drive and pointing to it, this allows
    the end user to install hardware/software without requiring the install cd.
    as far as including it with your image, it depends on how much control your
    going to have on the computers that they will deploy to. If the users are
    to have no install control, then you can always keep the i386 folder off
    (you can have one copy of the folder on a network share or just walk around
    with the windows cd from computer to computer). Hope this clears things
    up.


    Greg
     
    greg, Mar 28, 2006
    #11
  12. Billh

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Mon, 27 Mar 2006 22:40:44 -0500, "JANA" <> wrote:

    >I can just see in a business environment, everyone needing their own copy of
    >the installation CD to do the updates, or whatever. This is not a practical
    >solution.


    At a 'business environment', the end user would not be reinstalling
    the O/S on their computer. A IT manager would.

    And he would either have a CD handy, or the image somewhere on a
    network drive.
    --
    To reply, remove TheObvious from my e-mail address.
     
    Evan Platt, Mar 28, 2006
    #12

  13. > Or do you keep going on about grown-ups in the hope I might reveal that I'm
    > under the legal age of consent?
    >
    >


    This wasn't surprising
     
    Roger Jansson, Mar 28, 2006
    #13
  14. Billh

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Mon, 27 Mar 2006 18:16:39 -0500, Billh wrote:

    > I have some Dell computers at work that I want to image and get the
    > image under 4 gigs as my imagecast program does not play well with over
    > 4 gig files.
    >
    > Fact in the c drive there is a folder called i386
    >
    > Second fact if you install XP SP2 in the Windows folder there is a
    > service pack folder called i386 of about the same size.
    >
    > Third fact if you format the hard drive and using the windows install cd
    > from Dell no I386 fold is created on the c drive.
    >
    > Question can I delete the i386 folder in the c drive safely?
    >
    > These computers are in a lab and hardware is not added to them often if
    > at all. And if hardware is added it is done by me and I have the xp cd
    > any ways.


    Have the CEO spring for some decent image software.
    --

    Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004
     
    Meat Plow, Mar 28, 2006
    #14
  15. Billh

    Peaches Guest

    Re: i386 folder delete it? Ian Hamilton Finlay CBE

    ">>>>>
    >>>>> So it's a yes then?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>> Yes
    >>>
    >>> Do your local police know about what you do on usenet then?
    >>>

    >>
    >>So no deviation from set strategies then KM,
    >>Once you start to lose the argument, you
    >>change from foul/obscene comments to
    >>personal abuse, you are so very predictable KM.
    >>

    > Look out or the foul/obscene personal abuse taunts will be directed
    > towards you, fucking useless twat.
    >
    > --
    >
    > So no deviation from set strategies then KM,
    > Once you start to lose the argument, you
    > change from foul/obscene comments to
    > personal abuse, you are so very predictable KM.


    POint out the argument.
    --

    > So no deviation from set strategies then KM,
    > Once you start to lose the argument, you
    > change from foul/obscene comments to
    > personal abuse, you are so very predictable KM.


    What fucking argument, you stupid, slab-sided trollop?

    Ah, you are all so sweet,
    and all the while I thought
    you were ignoring me.
    Cuddles to you all
    xxxxxxxxx


    PS.
    Scottish Poet and Artist, Ian Hamilton Finlay, CBE
    passed away march 27, 2006 aged 80

    http://www.geo.ed.ac.uk/scotgaz/people/famousfirst2498.html


    The Seas waves:
    http://tinyurl.com/jo66t
     
    Peaches, Mar 28, 2006
    #15
  16. Billh

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 08:21:53 +0200, Roger Jansson <>
    wrote:

    >That was a grown-up answer


    I think you'll see you're one of the few that hasn't killfiled KM.
    Please either do so, or if you keep responding to him, you'll find
    yourself killfiled also.
    --
    To reply, remove TheObvious from my e-mail address.
     
    Evan Platt, Mar 28, 2006
    #16
  17. Billh

    10_4 Guest

    "Evan Platt" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 27 Mar 2006 22:40:44 -0500, "JANA" <> wrote:
    >
    >>I can just see in a business environment, everyone needing their own copy
    >>of
    >>the installation CD to do the updates, or whatever. This is not a
    >>practical
    >>solution.

    >
    > At a 'business environment', the end user would not be reinstalling
    > the O/S on their computer. A IT manager would.
    >
    > And he would either have a CD handy, or the image somewhere on a
    > network drive.
    > --
    > To reply, remove TheObvious from my e-mail address.


    Evan,

    It appears we have a self made IT pro and a babbling idiot here. I offered
    an answer with an explanation and yes, I will add the babbling idiot to my
    kill list.

    I work with a company that spans five continents and has thousands of
    computers on hundreds of networks. I stand behind my answer and know of no
    dire consequences deleting the i386 folder will cause. Minor yes! Dire NO!

    Thanks,
    10_4
     
    10_4, Mar 28, 2006
    #17
  18. Billh

    10_4 Guest

    "greg" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9793EB0B7FE03gregnix20.yahoo.com@24.93.43.121...
    > The i386 is basically the main install folder that windows uses for
    > install. the folder is on the windows cd and can always be referenced
    > when
    > a piece of hardware or software is installed and a file is needed from
    > that
    > folder. The reason companies like dell and other companies put it on your
    > root drive is they no longer give you a copy of windows(although i think
    > dell still does). they usually give you a sort of image of their software
    > package usually spanning 3-6 cd's or a hidden partition. Therefore by
    > putting the i386 folder on the root drive and pointing to it, this allows
    > the end user to install hardware/software without requiring the install
    > cd.
    > as far as including it with your image, it depends on how much control
    > your
    > going to have on the computers that they will deploy to. If the users are
    > to have no install control, then you can always keep the i386 folder off
    > (you can have one copy of the folder on a network share or just walk
    > around
    > with the windows cd from computer to computer). Hope this clears things
    > up.
    >
    >
    > Greg
    >


    Yes it does Greg but KM doesn't have a brain or clue so look for his
    babbling.
     
    10_4, Mar 28, 2006
    #18
  19. Billh

    Billh Guest

    Greg thank you for taking the time to reply. I did not know my question
    would set off such a fire storm. What you have stated is what I had
    figured was the case. As these are in labs for middle and high school
    students use they would not be installing anything. And I would have
    the cd with me.

    I had just hoped some one had deleted the folder and could give me a
    first hand account. If it worked out or if they regretted it. I guess I
    will just try and delete on a few and see what comes of it.


    greg wrote:
    > The i386 is basically the main install folder that windows uses for
    > install. the folder is on the windows cd and can always be referenced when
    > a piece of hardware or software is installed and a file is needed from that
    > folder. The reason companies like dell and other companies put it on your
    > root drive is they no longer give you a copy of windows(although i think
    > dell still does). they usually give you a sort of image of their software
    > package usually spanning 3-6 cd's or a hidden partition. Therefore by
    > putting the i386 folder on the root drive and pointing to it, this allows
    > the end user to install hardware/software without requiring the install cd.
    > as far as including it with your image, it depends on how much control your
    > going to have on the computers that they will deploy to. If the users are
    > to have no install control, then you can always keep the i386 folder off
    > (you can have one copy of the folder on a network share or just walk around
    > with the windows cd from computer to computer). Hope this clears things
    > up.
    >
    >
    > Greg
    >
     
    Billh, Mar 28, 2006
    #19
  20. 10_4 <> wrote:

    > "Evan Platt" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Mon, 27 Mar 2006 22:40:44 -0500, "JANA" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I can just see in a business environment, everyone needing their
    >>> own copy of
    >>> the installation CD to do the updates, or whatever. This is not a
    >>> practical
    >>> solution.

    >>
    >> At a 'business environment', the end user would not be reinstalling
    >> the O/S on their computer. A IT manager would.
    >>
    >> And he would either have a CD handy, or the image somewhere on a
    >> network drive.
    >> --
    >> To reply, remove TheObvious from my e-mail address.

    >
    > Evan,
    >
    > It appears we have a self made IT pro and a babbling idiot here. I
    > offered an answer with an explanation and yes, I will add the
    > babbling idiot to my kill list.
    >
    > I work with a company that spans five continents and has thousands of
    > computers on hundreds of networks. I stand behind my answer and know
    > of no dire consequences deleting the i386 folder will cause. Minor
    > yes! Dire NO!


    Who said dire? I could have sworn it was only 'consequences'. Maybe you
    could learn to read?
     
    Antarpreet Subramanya, Mar 29, 2006
    #20
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