I was a big fan of Mozilla, but...

Discussion in 'Firefox' started by Kerberos, Nov 20, 2004.

  1. Kerberos

    Kerberos Guest

    I switched from Internet Explorer early 2003 when I discovered the Mozilla
    Suite, it was quite good, although the GUI was not as clean as Internet
    Explorer, but I was pretty happy because it had roughly everything in one
    application (browser, e-mail, composer, address book and IRC). I was also
    very happy to use an open-source and fairly secure browser, and that's a
    good thing. Then Mozilla released Phoenix, that I gave a try and I found
    it was pretty good, it had a much cleaner user interface than the Mozilla
    Suite, however I found a real pitty that they took out the other goodies
    such as the e-mail client, the composer and the IRC client. That was the
    Mozilla Foundation's goal anyway.

    Well, I started using both, and then I used Thunderbird for a while, I
    also updated Phoenix to Firebird and to Firefox earlier this year. That
    wasn't too bad, but I was always seperated between Mozilla's wealth of
    options in the Preferences menu, with all in one application, and to the
    other side, Firefox with a nicer GUI, but very little options in the
    Configuration menu. I didn't like the fact of having to download
    extentions, and browse an endless list of extentions. There are several
    behaviors of Firefox that drived me nuts such as clicking the tab of a
    page not toggling between active/inactive for instance. The lack of
    options in the basic installation plus the same download speed as other
    browsers (Mozilla and Internet Explorer) made me look for something else.

    I found several other browsers in Download.com, but I was more
    disappointed. Guess what I tried for instance: Avant Browser, which is
    based on Internet Explorer. How can I trust this browser? It's free, but
    all I got was what I paid for. Then I found Opera had a pretty high rank,
    and I said "Let's give it a try again", I had used it several years ago,
    and didn't like it that much because of the large banner ad at that time.
    I downloaded the 7.54 version, and it was a real good first impression.

    The first thing that surprised me was the non intrusive little text-based
    ad on top. I started configuring and customizing the browser to my taste,
    and it was very easy, I right-clicked every bar, and replaced them to my
    taste. I also removed the useless search fields on top, configured the
    e-mail client, Usenet client, imported the bookmarks from Mozilla, and
    began to use the Internet. Download speed was very fast, this is not just
    hype, I was surprised. It's a little less rapid that loading a local page,
    but it's real fast. Pages are now displayed just like in Internet Explorer
    in 90% of times, and that's a good thing, it used to be a problem years
    back. Interface is real clean and uncluttered. It has a pretty neat tool
    bar on the left-hand side, and there is something that I love is that
    everything is docked, even the download manager. The number of options in
    the configuration menu is impressive. I also love the Wand feature that
    works this way: When I access a page where I previously accessed with a
    password, the fields get an orange outline showing that I stored the
    password. I just have to click the Wand icon, and Opera types in my user,
    password and clicks the Submit button automatically. I like the Filter
    feature of the e-mail client a lot. When I select an e-mail address in the
    address book, all related messages are displayed. The Notes feature saves
    me a lot of time, and double-clicking a note add it to a message in the
    Compose page. Opera is also the most advanced application that takes
    advantage of XHTML, CSS, and standards in general advised by the W3C. It's
    the only browser that displays tags such as <link href="chapter2.html"
    rel="prev" rev="next" /> in the top navbar.

    I'm doing a lot more things with Opera, and I work more efficiently, and
    everything is quickly accessed. I decided to buy a license to get rid of
    the ad on top (It was not expensive at all - US$39), and I'll stick with
    Opera. It's not just a browser, but a real professional productivity suite
    gathering several docked applications that one uses during the day
    (Browser, E-mail client, Chat client, Address Book, etc...) The
    application is very light, setup file is just 3.5MB compared to Firefox
    (4.52MB) that has just a simple browser.

    I found a comparison chart of several popular browsers here:
    http://spreadopera.auriance.com/browser_comparison.php

    I don't know about those of you who may have used different browsers, but
    I think Opera is the most advanced browser nowadays. That would be great
    if it were open-source, but also sometimes I say to myself, if it were
    open-source, it wouldn't have had all the money to finance intensive
    programming and design skills at full time.


    --

    Kerberos.

    http://www.opera.com
    http://www.freebsd.org
    http://www.osresources.com
    Kerberos, Nov 20, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Kerberos

    :: BRIAN :: Guest

    (On 11/20/2004 12:25 PM) Kerberos wrote:
    > I switched from Internet Explorer early 2003 when I discovered the
    > Mozilla Suite, it was quite good, although the GUI was not as clean as
    > Internet Explorer, but I was pretty happy because it had roughly
    > everything in one application (browser, e-mail, composer, address book
    > and IRC). I was also very happy to use an open-source and fairly secure
    > browser, and that's a good thing. Then Mozilla released Phoenix, that I
    > gave a try and I found it was pretty good, it had a much cleaner user
    > interface than the Mozilla Suite, however I found a real pitty that
    > they took out the other goodies such as the e-mail client, the composer
    > and the IRC client. That was the Mozilla Foundation's goal anyway.


    You like having one program to do everything? Not me.

    > Well, I started using both, and then I used Thunderbird for a while, I
    > also updated Phoenix to Firebird and to Firefox earlier this year. That
    > wasn't too bad, but I was always seperated between Mozilla's wealth of
    > options in the Preferences menu, with all in one application, and to
    > the other side, Firefox with a nicer GUI, but very little options in
    > the Configuration menu. I didn't like the fact of having to download
    > extentions, and browse an endless list of extentions. There are several
    > behaviors of Firefox that drived me nuts such as clicking the tab of a
    > page not toggling between active/inactive for instance. The lack of
    > options in the basic installation plus the same download speed as other
    > browsers (Mozilla and Internet Explorer) made me look for something else.


    So you don't like the option of being able to install an endless amount
    of extensions to add functionality to FF... and like being stuck with a
    set number of "tools" in Opera with no option to add functionality...
    got it.

    > I found several other browsers in Download.com, but I was more
    > disappointed. Guess what I tried for instance: Avant Browser, which is
    > based on Internet Explorer. How can I trust this browser? It's free,
    > but all I got was what I paid for. Then I found Opera had a pretty high
    > rank, and I said "Let's give it a try again", I had used it several
    > years ago, and didn't like it that much because of the large banner ad
    > at that time. I downloaded the 7.54 version, and it was a real good
    > first impression.
    >
    > The first thing that surprised me was the non intrusive little
    > text-based ad on top. I started configuring and customizing the browser
    > to my taste, and it was very easy, I right-clicked every bar, and
    > replaced them to my taste. I also removed the useless search fields on
    > top, configured the e-mail client, Usenet client, imported the
    > bookmarks from Mozilla, and began to use the Internet. Download speed
    > was very fast, this is not just hype, I was surprised. It's a little
    > less rapid that loading a local page, but it's real fast. Pages are now
    > displayed just like in Internet Explorer in 90% of times, and that's a
    > good thing, it used to be a problem years back. Interface is real clean
    > and uncluttered. It has a pretty neat tool bar on the left-hand side,
    > and there is something that I love is that everything is docked, even
    > the download manager. The number of options in the configuration menu
    > is impressive. I also love the Wand feature that works this way: When I
    > access a page where I previously accessed with a password, the fields
    > get an orange outline showing that I stored the password. I just have
    > to click the Wand icon, and Opera types in my user, password and clicks
    > the Submit button automatically. I like the Filter feature of the
    > e-mail client a lot. When I select an e-mail address in the address
    > book, all related messages are displayed. The Notes feature saves me a
    > lot of time, and double-clicking a note add it to a message in the
    > Compose page. Opera is also the most advanced application that takes
    > advantage of XHTML, CSS, and standards in general advised by the W3C.
    > It's the only browser that displays tags such as <link
    > href="chapter2.html" rel="prev" rev="next" /> in the top navbar.


    I don't have to do anything to get FF to input my username and
    passwords; it just fills in the saved ones for me. No stupid little
    fairy wand.

    > I'm doing a lot more things with Opera, and I work more efficiently,
    > and everything is quickly accessed. I decided to buy a license to get
    > rid of the ad on top (It was not expensive at all - US$39), and I'll
    > stick with Opera. It's not just a browser, but a real professional
    > productivity suite gathering several docked applications that one uses
    > during the day (Browser, E-mail client, Chat client, Address Book,
    > etc...) The application is very light, setup file is just 3.5MB
    > compared to Firefox (4.52MB) that has just a simple browser.


    But I thought the ads were "non intrusive"? Why would you spend $39 to
    get rid of the "non intrusive" ads? And what is this the 80s? You're
    worried about 1MB? You are using Windows... you can't be worried too
    much about minimal file sizes and wasting space.

    > I found a comparison chart of several popular browsers here:
    > http://spreadopera.auriance.com/browser_comparison.php
    >
    > I don't know about those of you who may have used different browsers,
    > but I think Opera is the most advanced browser nowadays. That would be
    > great if it were open-source, but also sometimes I say to myself, if it
    > were open-source, it wouldn't have had all the money to finance
    > intensive programming and design skills at full time.


    I love how it doesn't work on a number of sites I need to access... and
    FF works just fine.

    I guess we have different opinions of what "cluttered" means... Opera is
    not "clean" IMHO.

    [http://68.1.17.8/p0nykiller/images/temp/operaebay.png]
    [http://68.1.17.8/p0nykiller/images/temp/ffebay.png]

    Enjoy your browser. You might want to check out news://opera.general
    for more loving Opera discussion.

    --
    Brian
    :: BRIAN ::, Nov 20, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Kerberos

    :: BRIAN :: Guest

    (On 11/20/2004 1:04 PM) :: BRIAN :: wrote:

    > I love how it doesn't work on a number of sites I need to access... and
    > FF works just fine.
    >
    > I guess we have different opinions of what "cluttered" means... Opera is
    > not "clean" IMHO.
    >
    > [http://68.1.17.8/p0nykiller/images/temp/operaebay.png]
    > [http://68.1.17.8/p0nykiller/images/temp/ffebay.png]


    And yes I know the FF and Opera pages look different. That's because I
    have AdBlock removing everything from http://*.doubleclick.* and those
    eBay pages have a lot of crap from Doubleclick... thus it's removed.

    Disable AdBlock and the page looks a lot different.

    [http://68.1.17.8/p0nykiller/images/temp/blocked_crap.png]
    :: BRIAN ::, Nov 20, 2004
    #3
  4. Kerberos

    Kerberos Guest

    Em Sat, 20 Nov 2004 13:04:14 -0500, :: BRIAN :: <user@127.0.1.1> escreveu:

    > So you don't like the option of being able to install an endless amount
    > of extensions to add functionality to FF... and like being stuck with a
    > set number of "tools" in Opera with no option to add functionality...
    > got it.


    I'm lost with all these extentions. I prefer to have them all bundled,
    best of all, the whole application remains lighter than Firefox without
    any extention. Frankly, I don't anything more that the current features of
    Opera. Version 7.6 is about to be out, and I don't know how they will
    improve Opera this time.


    > I don't have to do anything to get FF to input my username and
    > passwords; it just fills in the saved ones for me. No stupid little
    > fairy wand.


    This is just not true. For instance if you have an e-mail account at
    Yahoo.com, go to http://mail.yahoo.com. Does Firefox fill in automatically
    your username and password and click the "Sign In" button automatically
    for you? Not on my computer.


    > I love how it doesn't work on a number of sites I need to access... and
    > FF works just fine.


    I hardly ever see web sites that won't work properly with Opera. There are
    some web sites such as Microsoft web sites that have javascripts to switch
    style sheets according to the browser used, but again, the vast majority
    of web sites display just fine in Opera, which wasn't true a year ago.



    > I guess we have different opinions of what "cluttered" means... Opera is
    > not "clean" IMHO.
    >
    > [http://68.1.17.8/p0nykiller/images/temp/operaebay.png]
    > [http://68.1.17.8/p0nykiller/images/temp/ffebay.png]


    I would have removed the Price Comparison and Amazon search boxed to save
    room.
    If you don't use the left toolbar that much, clicking the left thick
    border toggles the bar. In that case, it would look just like Firefox, and
    still, options and the toolbar would be easily accessible.



    --

    Kerberos.

    http://www.opera.com
    http://www.freebsd.org
    http://www.osresources.com
    Kerberos, Nov 20, 2004
    #4
  5. Kerberos

    Tom Betz Guest

    Quoth Kerberos <> in
    news:eek::

    >
    > Well, I started using both, and then I used Thunderbird for a
    > while, I also updated Phoenix to Firebird and to Firefox
    > earlier this year. That wasn't too bad, but I was always
    > seperated between Mozilla's wealth of options in the
    > Preferences menu, with all in one application, and to the other
    > side, Firefox with a nicer GUI, but very little options in the
    > Configuration menu.


    Have you ever types about:config in the address bar?

    You get a HUGE list of configuration options you can edit. You can
    tweak just about everything to suit yourself.

    --
    George Bush's War of Choice on Iraq is a totally unnecessary war.
    Every life lost, every limb lost, every disfigurement, every
    disability caused there is more blood on George W. Bush's hands,
    and on the hands of everyone who voted for George W. Bush.
    The more you know, the less likely you were to vote for Bush.
    <http://shorterlink.com/?47TBP8>
    Feeling a draft? <http://shorterlink.com/?930B5U>
    For the facts on Iraq, see <http://optruth.org>.
    Tom Betz, Nov 21, 2004
    #5
  6. Kerberos

    Lou Guest

    On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 00:21:15 +0000 (UTC), Tom Betz
    <> wrote:

    > George Bush's War of Choice on Iraq is a totally unnecessary war.
    > Every life lost, every limb lost, every disfigurement, every
    > disability caused there is more blood on George W. Bush's hands,
    > and on the hands of everyone who voted for George W. Bush.
    > The more you know, the less likely you were to vote for Bush.
    > <http://shorterlink.com/?47TBP8>
    > Feeling a draft? <http://shorterlink.com/?930B5U>
    > For the facts on Iraq, see <http://optruth.org>.


    Hey Betz, it looks like you've contracted a classic case of PEST.

    How can you tell if you’re afflicted with PEST (Post Election
    Selection Trauma)? First you must be a Democrat and in extreme
    denial that your most favorite empty suit lost the presidential
    election.

    PEST--Post-election selection trauma is agravated by eating
    sour grapes........ Read it and weep, Betz, 4 more years...... 8^)

    Never, never, "misunderestimate" Dubya.

    YAAA-friggin-HOOOOOO from a "knuckle dragging Cracker from Redneckia"
    Lou, Nov 21, 2004
    #6
  7. Kerberos

    Lil' Abner Guest

    I tried Opera a couple of times. Right off I noticed when I went to my
    online banking account and after I got logged in, my options menu was
    gone. I kicked it around in the opera newsgroup a bit, and they finally
    traced it to some script or something and said I should notify the bank
    to fix it. Shortly after that, I opened a second account at another
    bank, and ran into the same thing under a different format. I doubt if
    either bank is going to revamp their code just because one customer is
    using Opera and can't make it work. This shows what's missing:
    http://www.mewnlite.com/bankdisplay.jpg

    Kerberos <> wrote in
    news:eek::

    > I switched from Internet Explorer early 2003 when I discovered the
    > Mozilla Suite, it was quite good, although the GUI was not as clean
    > as Internet Explorer, but I was pretty happy because it had roughly
    > everything in one application (browser, e-mail, composer, address
    > book and IRC). I was also very happy to use an open-source and fairly
    > secure browser, and that's a good thing. Then Mozilla released
    > Phoenix, that I gave a try and I found it was pretty good, it had a
    > much cleaner user interface than the Mozilla Suite, however I found a
    > real pitty that they took out the other goodies such as the e-mail
    > client, the composer and the IRC client. That was the Mozilla
    > Foundation's goal anyway.
    >
    > Well, I started using both, and then I used Thunderbird for a while, I
    > also updated Phoenix to Firebird and to Firefox earlier this year.
    > That wasn't too bad, but I was always seperated between Mozilla's
    > wealth of options in the Preferences menu, with all in one
    > application, and to the other side, Firefox with a nicer GUI, but
    > very little options in the Configuration menu. I didn't like the fact
    > of having to download extentions, and browse an endless list of
    > extentions. There are several behaviors of Firefox that drived me
    > nuts such as clicking the tab of a page not toggling between
    > active/inactive for instance. The lack of options in the basic
    > installation plus the same download speed as other browsers (Mozilla
    > and Internet Explorer) made me look for something else.
    >
    > I found several other browsers in Download.com, but I was more
    > disappointed. Guess what I tried for instance: Avant Browser, which is
    > based on Internet Explorer. How can I trust this browser? It's free,
    > but all I got was what I paid for. Then I found Opera had a pretty
    > high rank, and I said "Let's give it a try again", I had used it
    > several years ago, and didn't like it that much because of the large
    > banner ad at that time. I downloaded the 7.54 version, and it was a
    > real good first impression.
    >
    > The first thing that surprised me was the non intrusive little
    > text-based ad on top. I started configuring and customizing the
    > browser to my taste, and it was very easy, I right-clicked every bar,
    > and replaced them to my taste. I also removed the useless search
    > fields on top, configured the e-mail client, Usenet client, imported
    > the bookmarks from Mozilla, and began to use the Internet. Download
    > speed was very fast, this is not just hype, I was surprised. It's a
    > little less rapid that loading a local page, but it's real fast.
    > Pages are now displayed just like in Internet Explorer in 90% of
    > times, and that's a good thing, it used to be a problem years back.
    > Interface is real clean and uncluttered. It has a pretty neat tool
    > bar on the left-hand side, and there is something that I love is that
    > everything is docked, even the download manager. The number of options
    > in the configuration menu is impressive. I also love the Wand feature
    > that works this way: When I access a page where I previously accessed
    > with a password, the fields get an orange outline showing that I
    > stored the password. I just have to click the Wand icon, and Opera
    > types in my user, password and clicks the Submit button
    > automatically. I like the Filter feature of the e-mail client a lot.
    > When I select an e-mail address in the address book, all related
    > messages are displayed. The Notes feature saves me a lot of time, and
    > double-clicking a note add it to a message in the Compose page. Opera
    > is also the most advanced application that takes advantage of XHTML,
    > CSS, and standards in general advised by the W3C. It's the only
    > browser that displays tags such as <link href="chapter2.html"
    > rel="prev" rev="next" /> in the top navbar.
    >
    > I'm doing a lot more things with Opera, and I work more efficiently,
    > and everything is quickly accessed. I decided to buy a license to get
    > rid of the ad on top (It was not expensive at all - US$39), and I'll
    > stick with Opera. It's not just a browser, but a real professional
    > productivity suite gathering several docked applications that one
    > uses during the day (Browser, E-mail client, Chat client, Address
    > Book, etc...) The application is very light, setup file is just 3.5MB
    > compared to Firefox (4.52MB) that has just a simple browser.
    >
    > I found a comparison chart of several popular browsers here:
    > http://spreadopera.auriance.com/browser_comparison.php
    >
    > I don't know about those of you who may have used different browsers,
    > but I think Opera is the most advanced browser nowadays. That would
    > be great if it were open-source, but also sometimes I say to myself,
    > if it were open-source, it wouldn't have had all the money to finance
    > intensive programming and design skills at full time.
    >
    >
    Lil' Abner, Nov 21, 2004
    #7
  8. Kerberos

    Tony Raven Guest

    Tony Raven, Nov 21, 2004
    #8
  9. Kerberos

    Guest

    It's funny you posted this, because I went just the opposite
    direction. I used Opera 5.x and 6.x. I was pretty satisfied, but did
    have a few complaints. The biggest complaint was that Opera was
    slower than IE. Yes, I said SLOWER !!! Maybe just my slow computer,
    I dont know, but IE was faster. When Opera 7.x came out, I installed
    it and found it crashed regularly, I hated the look of it, it was
    slower still, had far too many bells and whistles and settings to deal
    with, and I pretty much hated the whole thing. I had installed it
    over the top of ver. 6.x and had a big mess of both versions combined
    in the same directory. I finally just deleted the whole mess and went
    back to IE.

    Then IE got hijacked and got all screwed up. Eventually I fixed that,
    but in the process I had gone back to an older version of Netscape. I
    used that for awhile, but found it would not load many newer webpages.
    I had already refused to use the newest Netscape, because I know they
    are tied with AOL, and I hate AOL.

    I found Avant browser, and liked many of the features. However, I got
    both IE and Avant hijacked once again. That's when I said the hell
    with IE and anything based on it. I used the old Netscape again for
    awhile, and thats when I found Firefox. I love it !!!
    It never crashes, it does loads kind of slow, but once loaded, the
    individual pages load faster than any other browser I ever used. It's
    not bloated with a ton of crap, and it is easy to use. I love it !!!
    Now, I say that for the overall program. There are two particular
    features that I dislike. One is lacking, the other is useless and
    impossible to get rid of. One other dislike is that it does not
    handle test scrolling like IE, and my own webpage has some very
    advanced scrolling feature that took me months to develop, and it dont
    work in Firefox. Aside from that. Firefox is the best, and I will be
    sticking with it. Simply the fact that it dont crash has me sold. I
    just hope firefox dont do the screwup that Opera did when they changed
    from earlier versions to ver. 7.x. To me, thats when Opera died.

    Thats my 2 cents !!!

    Mark



    On Sat, 20 Nov 2004 15:25:47 -0200, Kerberos <> wrote:

    >I switched from Internet Explorer early 2003 when I discovered the Mozilla
    >Suite, it was quite good, although the GUI was not as clean as Internet
    >Explorer, but I was pretty happy because it had roughly everything in one
    >application (browser, e-mail, composer, address book and IRC). I was also
    >very happy to use an open-source and fairly secure browser, and that's a
    >good thing. Then Mozilla released Phoenix, that I gave a try and I found
    >it was pretty good, it had a much cleaner user interface than the Mozilla
    >Suite, however I found a real pitty that they took out the other goodies
    >such as the e-mail client, the composer and the IRC client. That was the
    >Mozilla Foundation's goal anyway.
    >
    >Well, I started using both, and then I used Thunderbird for a while, I
    >also updated Phoenix to Firebird and to Firefox earlier this year. That
    >wasn't too bad, but I was always seperated between Mozilla's wealth of
    >options in the Preferences menu, with all in one application, and to the
    >other side, Firefox with a nicer GUI, but very little options in the
    >Configuration menu. I didn't like the fact of having to download
    >extentions, and browse an endless list of extentions. There are several
    >behaviors of Firefox that drived me nuts such as clicking the tab of a
    >page not toggling between active/inactive for instance. The lack of
    >options in the basic installation plus the same download speed as other
    >browsers (Mozilla and Internet Explorer) made me look for something else.
    >
    >I found several other browsers in Download.com, but I was more
    >disappointed. Guess what I tried for instance: Avant Browser, which is
    >based on Internet Explorer. How can I trust this browser? It's free, but
    >all I got was what I paid for. Then I found Opera had a pretty high rank,
    >and I said "Let's give it a try again", I had used it several years ago,
    >and didn't like it that much because of the large banner ad at that time.
    >I downloaded the 7.54 version, and it was a real good first impression.
    >
    >The first thing that surprised me was the non intrusive little text-based
    >ad on top. I started configuring and customizing the browser to my taste,
    >and it was very easy, I right-clicked every bar, and replaced them to my
    >taste. I also removed the useless search fields on top, configured the
    >e-mail client, Usenet client, imported the bookmarks from Mozilla, and
    >began to use the Internet. Download speed was very fast, this is not just
    >hype, I was surprised. It's a little less rapid that loading a local page,
    >but it's real fast. Pages are now displayed just like in Internet Explorer
    >in 90% of times, and that's a good thing, it used to be a problem years
    >back. Interface is real clean and uncluttered. It has a pretty neat tool
    >bar on the left-hand side, and there is something that I love is that
    >everything is docked, even the download manager. The number of options in
    >the configuration menu is impressive. I also love the Wand feature that
    >works this way: When I access a page where I previously accessed with a
    >password, the fields get an orange outline showing that I stored the
    >password. I just have to click the Wand icon, and Opera types in my user,
    >password and clicks the Submit button automatically. I like the Filter
    >feature of the e-mail client a lot. When I select an e-mail address in the
    >address book, all related messages are displayed. The Notes feature saves
    >me a lot of time, and double-clicking a note add it to a message in the
    >Compose page. Opera is also the most advanced application that takes
    >advantage of XHTML, CSS, and standards in general advised by the W3C. It's
    >the only browser that displays tags such as <link href="chapter2.html"
    >rel="prev" rev="next" /> in the top navbar.
    >
    >I'm doing a lot more things with Opera, and I work more efficiently, and
    >everything is quickly accessed. I decided to buy a license to get rid of
    >the ad on top (It was not expensive at all - US$39), and I'll stick with
    >Opera. It's not just a browser, but a real professional productivity suite
    >gathering several docked applications that one uses during the day
    >(Browser, E-mail client, Chat client, Address Book, etc...) The
    >application is very light, setup file is just 3.5MB compared to Firefox
    >(4.52MB) that has just a simple browser.
    >
    >I found a comparison chart of several popular browsers here:
    >http://spreadopera.auriance.com/browser_comparison.php
    >
    >I don't know about those of you who may have used different browsers, but
    >I think Opera is the most advanced browser nowadays. That would be great
    >if it were open-source, but also sometimes I say to myself, if it were
    >open-source, it wouldn't have had all the money to finance intensive
    >programming and design skills at full time.
    , Nov 21, 2004
    #9
  10. Kerberos

    Tom Betz Guest

    Quoth Lou <> in
    news::

    >
    > Hey Betz, it looks like you've contracted a classic case of PEST.


    Well, I just got rid of a pest, that's for damned sure.

    --
    George Bush's War of Choice on Iraq is a totally unnecessary war.
    Every life lost, every limb lost, every disfigurement, every
    disability caused there is more blood on George W. Bush's hands,
    and on the hands of everyone who voted for George W. Bush.
    The more you know, the less likely you were to vote for Bush.
    <http://shorterlink.com/?47TBP8>
    Feeling a draft? <http://shorterlink.com/?930B5U>
    For the facts on Iraq, see <http://optruth.org>.
    Tom Betz, Nov 21, 2004
    #10
  11. Kerberos

    Kerberos Guest

    Em Sun, 21 Nov 2004 04:46:45 -0600, <> escreveu:

    > It's funny you posted this, because I went just the opposite
    > direction. I used Opera 5.x and 6.x. I was pretty satisfied, but did
    > have a few complaints. The biggest complaint was that Opera was
    > slower than IE. Yes, I said SLOWER !!! Maybe just my slow computer,


    Very strange. We have 4 computers in the office, and we didn't find any
    loss in speed over the time when we updated Opera.

    > I had installed it
    > over the top of ver. 6.x and had a big mess of both versions combined
    > in the same directory.


    Then there has been something wrong during installation. When updating,
    the only thing that is kept is the user's preferences, e-mail, etc. I
    never saw such a thing as having a little bit of both versions.

    > just hope firefox dont do the screwup that Opera did when they changed
    > from earlier versions to ver. 7.x. To me, thats when Opera died.


    Come on, Opera recently reported a significant increase of revenue and has
    doubled its workforce this year.
    I'm having a hard time believing this, sorry.


    > On Sat, 20 Nov 2004 15:25:47 -0200, Kerberos <> wrote:
    >
    >> I switched from Internet Explorer early 2003 when I discovered the
    >> Mozilla
    >> Suite, it was quite good, although the GUI was not as clean as Internet
    >> Explorer, but I was pretty happy because it had roughly everything in
    >> one
    >> application (browser, e-mail, composer, address book and IRC). I was
    >> also
    >> very happy to use an open-source and fairly secure browser, and that's a
    >> good thing. Then Mozilla released Phoenix, that I gave a try and I found
    >> it was pretty good, it had a much cleaner user interface than the
    >> Mozilla
    >> Suite, however I found a real pitty that they took out the other goodies
    >> such as the e-mail client, the composer and the IRC client. That was the
    >> Mozilla Foundation's goal anyway.
    >>
    >> Well, I started using both, and then I used Thunderbird for a while, I
    >> also updated Phoenix to Firebird and to Firefox earlier this year. That
    >> wasn't too bad, but I was always seperated between Mozilla's wealth of
    >> options in the Preferences menu, with all in one application, and to the
    >> other side, Firefox with a nicer GUI, but very little options in the
    >> Configuration menu. I didn't like the fact of having to download
    >> extentions, and browse an endless list of extentions. There are several
    >> behaviors of Firefox that drived me nuts such as clicking the tab of a
    >> page not toggling between active/inactive for instance. The lack of
    >> options in the basic installation plus the same download speed as other
    >> browsers (Mozilla and Internet Explorer) made me look for something
    >> else.
    >>
    >> I found several other browsers in Download.com, but I was more
    >> disappointed. Guess what I tried for instance: Avant Browser, which is
    >> based on Internet Explorer. How can I trust this browser? It's free, but
    >> all I got was what I paid for. Then I found Opera had a pretty high
    >> rank,
    >> and I said "Let's give it a try again", I had used it several years ago,
    >> and didn't like it that much because of the large banner ad at that
    >> time.
    >> I downloaded the 7.54 version, and it was a real good first impression.
    >>
    >> The first thing that surprised me was the non intrusive little
    >> text-based
    >> ad on top. I started configuring and customizing the browser to my
    >> taste,
    >> and it was very easy, I right-clicked every bar, and replaced them to my
    >> taste. I also removed the useless search fields on top, configured the
    >> e-mail client, Usenet client, imported the bookmarks from Mozilla, and
    >> began to use the Internet. Download speed was very fast, this is not
    >> just
    >> hype, I was surprised. It's a little less rapid that loading a local
    >> page,
    >> but it's real fast. Pages are now displayed just like in Internet
    >> Explorer
    >> in 90% of times, and that's a good thing, it used to be a problem years
    >> back. Interface is real clean and uncluttered. It has a pretty neat tool
    >> bar on the left-hand side, and there is something that I love is that
    >> everything is docked, even the download manager. The number of options
    >> in
    >> the configuration menu is impressive. I also love the Wand feature that
    >> works this way: When I access a page where I previously accessed with a
    >> password, the fields get an orange outline showing that I stored the
    >> password. I just have to click the Wand icon, and Opera types in my
    >> user,
    >> password and clicks the Submit button automatically. I like the Filter
    >> feature of the e-mail client a lot. When I select an e-mail address in
    >> the
    >> address book, all related messages are displayed. The Notes feature
    >> saves
    >> me a lot of time, and double-clicking a note add it to a message in the
    >> Compose page. Opera is also the most advanced application that takes
    >> advantage of XHTML, CSS, and standards in general advised by the W3C.
    >> It's
    >> the only browser that displays tags such as <link href="chapter2.html"
    >> rel="prev" rev="next" /> in the top navbar.
    >>
    >> I'm doing a lot more things with Opera, and I work more efficiently, and
    >> everything is quickly accessed. I decided to buy a license to get rid of
    >> the ad on top (It was not expensive at all - US$39), and I'll stick with
    >> Opera. It's not just a browser, but a real professional productivity
    >> suite
    >> gathering several docked applications that one uses during the day
    >> (Browser, E-mail client, Chat client, Address Book, etc...) The
    >> application is very light, setup file is just 3.5MB compared to Firefox
    >> (4.52MB) that has just a simple browser.
    >>
    >> I found a comparison chart of several popular browsers here:
    >> http://spreadopera.auriance.com/browser_comparison.php
    >>
    >> I don't know about those of you who may have used different browsers,
    >> but
    >> I think Opera is the most advanced browser nowadays. That would be great
    >> if it were open-source, but also sometimes I say to myself, if it were
    >> open-source, it wouldn't have had all the money to finance intensive
    >> programming and design skills at full time.

    >




    --

    Kerberos.

    http://www.opera.com
    http://www.freebsd.org
    http://www.osresources.com
    Kerberos, Nov 22, 2004
    #11
  12. Kerberos

    Kerberos Guest

    Em Sun, 21 Nov 2004 00:21:15 +0000 (UTC), Tom Betz
    <> escreveu:

    > Have you ever types about:config in the address bar?
    > You get a HUGE list of configuration options you can edit. You can
    > tweak just about everything to suit yourself.


    I know, but it's very unintuitve, it's only a list of variables...
    I prefer a clean GUI for options.

    --

    Kerberos.

    http://www.opera.com
    http://www.freebsd.org
    http://www.osresources.com
    Kerberos, Nov 22, 2004
    #12
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