HP vs Epson paper?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by louise, Feb 11, 2007.

  1. louise

    louise Guest

    Just bought an HP 8250 and discover I seem to prefer Epson
    paper but I'm concerned about making archival prints which I
    hope will last a long long time. I was also under an
    impression that the printer and the paper should be of the
    same brand when possible - is this true?

    I'm planning to print a large quantity of prints to last a
    long time, I hope :)

    Any thoughts about quality and longevity of

    Epson Ultra Premium Glossy photo paper
    or
    HP Premium Plus HP Photo Paper high gloss

    TIA

    Louise
     
    louise, Feb 11, 2007
    #1
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  2. louise

    bluezfolk Guest

    On Feb 10, 11:58 pm, louise <> wrote:
    > Just bought an HP 8250 and discover I seem to prefer Epson
    > paper but I'm concerned about making archival prints which I
    > hope will last a long long time. I was also under an
    > impression that the printer and the paper should be of the
    > same brand when possible - is this true?
    >
    > I'm planning to print a large quantity of prints to last a
    > long time, I hope :)
    >
    > Any thoughts about quality and longevity of
    >
    > Epson Ultra Premium Glossy photo paper
    > or
    > HP Premium Plus HP Photo Paper high gloss
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Louise


    I'm sure the manufacturers would like us to believe that.


    Eric
     
    bluezfolk, Feb 11, 2007
    #2
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  3. louise wrote:
    > Just bought an HP 8250 and discover I seem to prefer Epson paper but I'm
    > concerned about making archival prints which I hope will last a long
    > long time. I was also under an impression that the printer and the
    > paper should be of the same brand when possible - is this true?
    >
    > I'm planning to print a large quantity of prints to last a long time, I
    > hope :)
    >
    > Any thoughts about quality and longevity of
    >
    > Epson Ultra Premium Glossy photo paper
    > or
    > HP Premium Plus HP Photo Paper high gloss


    I am under the impression that HP and Epson/Canon papers are different
    because the printers lay down the ink in a slightly different manner.
    The best you can do is try the papers out. I know that Epson papers are
    fine in Canon printers, so I buy those exclusively. Whatever course you
    take, it would be good to profile your printer/paper combination at
    Cathy's Profiles (just Google it up).

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Feb 11, 2007
    #3
  4. The other option is to use a flourescent light to test your paper/ink
    combination for durability.

    1. Get a 2 tube flourescent light fixture and hang 8" to 10" above a table
    in an unused area.

    2. Print out 2 copies of each paper/ink combination that you want to test.
    Mark what they are on the back.

    3. Place one of each pair under the light at the same time. Turn the light
    on.

    4. After a few days or weeks check the prints against each other and the
    twin to it stored in the dark.

    You should pretty quickly be able to decide if the paper/ink combination that
    you like is a good one.

    Have a good day. William

    --
    Message posted via http://www.photokb.com
     
    William Hathaway via PhotoKB.com, Feb 11, 2007
    #4
  5. louise

    Marvin Guest

    louise wrote:
    > Just bought an HP 8250 and discover I seem to prefer Epson paper but I'm
    > concerned about making archival prints which I hope will last a long
    > long time. I was also under an impression that the printer and the
    > paper should be of the same brand when possible - is this true?
    >
    > I'm planning to print a large quantity of prints to last a long time, I
    > hope :)
    >
    > Any thoughts about quality and longevity of
    >
    > Epson Ultra Premium Glossy photo paper
    > or
    > HP Premium Plus HP Photo Paper high gloss
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Louise


    I get good results with Kodak papers and HP ink, but when I
    tried an Epson paper the colors were all wrong. I haven't
    done extensive testing, but my experience with the longevity
    of that combination has been good. One print is a little
    larger than the frame, which is just two sheets of glass
    that make a sandwich with the print. The part of the print
    that sticks out is indistinguishable from the part under
    glass, after six years under room light. I see no fading
    over-all. I'm not positive the print is on Kodak paper with
    hP ink, but that combination has been my norm from before
    that print was made.
     
    Marvin, Feb 11, 2007
    #5
  6. louise

    frederick Guest

    William Hathaway via PhotoKB.com wrote:
    > The other option is to use a flourescent light to test your paper/ink
    > combination for durability.
    >
    > 1. Get a 2 tube flourescent light fixture and hang 8" to 10" above a table
    > in an unused area.
    >
    > 2. Print out 2 copies of each paper/ink combination that you want to test.
    > Mark what they are on the back.
    >
    > 3. Place one of each pair under the light at the same time. Turn the light
    > on.
    >
    > 4. After a few days or weeks check the prints against each other and the
    > twin to it stored in the dark.
    >
    > You should pretty quickly be able to decide if the paper/ink combination that
    > you like is a good one.
    >
    > Have a good day. William
    >

    That might give some indication of relative light fastness.
    Unfortunately, "gas fading" is likely to fade dye inks on "fast-dry" RC
    papers like Epson Premium Glossy much more quickly than light will in a
    normal display situation.
     
    frederick, Feb 11, 2007
    #6
  7. > Any thoughts about quality and longevity of
    >
    > Epson Ultra Premium Glossy photo paper
    > or
    > HP Premium Plus HP Photo Paper high gloss


    Hello,

    I've tried my HP8750 with Epson premium Glossy: the results were good, but
    the colours have changed (a lot) in several weeks.

    Now I print on Ilford "classic gloss" paper. In 6 weeks, it seems the
    colours has not changed. Wait and see...

    The prints on HP premium glossy paper are still good after 1,5 years. But
    i'm agree the Epson paper looks better. Ilford is good also.

    Good evening.

    Fred
     
    Fred le Barbu, Feb 11, 2007
    #7
  8. louise wrote:
    > Just bought an HP 8250 and discover I seem to prefer Epson paper but I'm
    > concerned about making archival prints which I hope will last a long
    > long time. I was also under an impression that the printer and the
    > paper should be of the same brand when possible - is this true?
    >
    > I'm planning to print a large quantity of prints to last a long time, I
    > hope :)
    >
    > Any thoughts about quality and longevity of
    >
    > Epson Ultra Premium Glossy photo paper
    > or
    > HP Premium Plus HP Photo Paper high gloss
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Louise


    Hi,

    I can't comment on Epson paper. I do know that HP Premium Plus papers
    have a thick resin coat, and that the ink is absorbed into the resin,
    not just on top. This not only gives depth to the colors, it is
    responsible for the relative permanence of the images. I therefor euse
    HP Premium Plus (glossy) paper and HP inks with my HP 8250 printer.

    Good luck.

    Morton
     
    Morton Linder, Feb 12, 2007
    #8
  9. louise

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Fred le Barbu wrote:
    >> Any thoughts about quality and longevity of
    >>
    >> Epson Ultra Premium Glossy photo paper
    >> or
    >> HP Premium Plus HP Photo Paper high gloss

    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I've tried my HP8750 with Epson premium Glossy: the results were good, but
    > the colours have changed (a lot) in several weeks.
    >
    > Now I print on Ilford "classic gloss" paper. In 6 weeks, it seems the
    > colours has not changed. Wait and see...
    >
    > The prints on HP premium glossy paper are still good after 1,5 years. But
    > i'm agree the Epson paper looks better. Ilford is good also.
    >
    > Good evening.
    >
    > Fred
    >
    >
    >

    Modern inkjet printers are a system, consisting of the printer, the ink,
    and the paper. Use what the manufacturer of the printer, and ink,
    recommends. They have a vested interest in producing the best image to
    satisfy their customers. Many new inks and papers react chemically, as
    well as mechanically, to produce a better image that will last a long time.
    I suspect that many of the complaints about fading are related to using
    incompatible ink and paper. I have a picture in my wallet that is about
    8 years old which was printed on an inkjet printer (HP), and it looks as
    good now as it did the day it was printed.
     
    Ron Hunter, Feb 12, 2007
    #9
  10. In article <>,
    Ron Hunter <> wrote:

    > Modern inkjet printers are a system, consisting of the printer, the ink,
    > and the paper. Use what the manufacturer of the printer, and ink,
    > recommends. They have a vested interest in producing the best image to
    > satisfy their customers. Many new inks and papers react chemically, as
    > well as mechanically, to produce a better image that will last a long time.
    > I suspect that many of the complaints about fading are related to using
    > incompatible ink and paper. I have a picture in my wallet that is about
    > 8 years old which was printed on an inkjet printer (HP), and it looks as
    > good now as it did the day it was printed.


    Just adding that;

    I think the two biggest culprits, dye set inks and instant dry papers
    that came early on the history of printers gave many a bad impression of
    what will happen over time.

    Though I would like to think the newer pigmented inks resolve these
    issues only time will tell, I am reserved and somewhat skeptical,
    there's a statement and it say if you want permanance stick with B&W
    silver printing-I tend to agree.

    --
    Would thou choose to meet a rat eating dragon, or
    a dragon, eating rat? The answer of: I am somewhere
    in the middle. "Me who is part taoist and part Christian".
     
    Little Green Eyed Dragon, Feb 12, 2007
    #10
  11. louise

    Arthur Bond Guest

    On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 23:58:13 -0500, louise <> wrote:

    >Just bought an HP 8250 and discover I seem to prefer Epson
    >paper but I'm concerned about making archival prints which I
    >hope will last a long long time. I was also under an
    >impression that the printer and the paper should be of the
    >same brand when possible - is this true?
    >
    >I'm planning to print a large quantity of prints to last a
    >long time, I hope :)
    >
    >Any thoughts about quality and longevity of
    >
    >Epson Ultra Premium Glossy photo paper
    >or
    >HP Premium Plus HP Photo Paper high gloss
    >
    >TIA
    >
    >Louise

    I don't think you can beat the combination of HP Vivera inks and HP Premium
    Plus paper for fade resistance quality from the reports that I have seen.
    -
    Replace 'invalid' with 'net' to reply.
     
    Arthur Bond, Feb 13, 2007
    #11
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