HP PSC 1315

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by geopelia, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    I'm thinking of getting a new printer. (inkjet)
    HP PSC 1315 has been recommended. It is a complete printer, scanner etc.
    It looks good, but are there any drawbacks to it?

    It will mostly be used for printing out emails, letters etc, not photos.

    Our present printer is a Lexmark, but it is so hard to find ink cartridges
    for it. I did find one eventually, but something inside the cartridge
    (driver?) broke down. I suspect it may have been a refilled one, as it just
    had a white label stuck on it, unlike the usual packaging of a new one. Same
    price though.

    I've got the weekend and Monday to decide.

    Thank you.

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Jan 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. geopelia

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:ZzACf.38440$...
    > I'm thinking of getting a new printer. (inkjet)
    > HP PSC 1315 has been recommended. It is a complete printer, scanner etc.
    > It looks good, but are there any drawbacks to it?
    >
    > It will mostly be used for printing out emails, letters etc, not photos.
    >
    > Our present printer is a Lexmark, but it is so hard to find ink cartridges
    > for it. I did find one eventually, but something inside the cartridge
    > (driver?) broke down. I suspect it may have been a refilled one, as it
    > just
    > had a white label stuck on it, unlike the usual packaging of a new one.
    > Same
    > price though.
    >
    > I've got the weekend and Monday to decide.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Geopelia


    Having seen a cheap HP 1410 in action. The scanning is good, and the
    printing is good. The bad news on that printer is the alignment of the
    pages. Photos get a border that tapers off. Also for photos it leaves a
    clear tab on the end of the paper.
    Cheap enough to run.

    I like my cheap Canon better. The print quality is slightly better and it
    does borderless prints. Cartidges are cheap enough for both printers. The
    Canon has a good LCD display.

    I'd recommend a Canon , but the HP will do a good enough job for what you
    want. Funny thing on the HP, every time you change a cartridge the bugger
    wants to print out a test page which it then wants to scan. If it's not
    done it will give an error every time you use it and cancel the the error.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Jan 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    news:1138438075.373293@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:ZzACf.38440$...
    > > I'm thinking of getting a new printer. (inkjet)
    > > HP PSC 1315 has been recommended. It is a complete printer, scanner etc.
    > > It looks good, but are there any drawbacks to it?
    > >
    > > It will mostly be used for printing out emails, letters etc, not photos.
    > >
    > > Our present printer is a Lexmark, but it is so hard to find ink

    cartridges
    > > for it. I did find one eventually, but something inside the cartridge
    > > (driver?) broke down. I suspect it may have been a refilled one, as it
    > > just
    > > had a white label stuck on it, unlike the usual packaging of a new one.
    > > Same
    > > price though.
    > >
    > > I've got the weekend and Monday to decide.
    > >
    > > Thank you.
    > >
    > > Geopelia

    >
    > Having seen a cheap HP 1410 in action. The scanning is good, and the
    > printing is good. The bad news on that printer is the alignment of the
    > pages. Photos get a border that tapers off. Also for photos it leaves a
    > clear tab on the end of the paper.
    > Cheap enough to run.
    >
    > I like my cheap Canon better. The print quality is slightly better and it
    > does borderless prints. Cartidges are cheap enough for both printers.

    The
    > Canon has a good LCD display.
    >
    > I'd recommend a Canon , but the HP will do a good enough job for what you
    > want. Funny thing on the HP, every time you change a cartridge the bugger
    > wants to print out a test page which it then wants to scan. If it's not
    > done it will give an error every time you use it and cancel the the error.
    >
    > E. Scrooge
    >


    Thank you Scrooge.

    I wonder if the 1315 is better than the 1410

    The NetGuide says the scanner is badly aligned. I suppose a bit of trial and
    error is needed to find out where to put the object to be scanned..
    I've had a look through our Consumers, but they don't seem to have that
    model. I'll keep in mind what you say about it wanting to print a test page.

    HP PSC 1315 is the one our computer shop recommends, and their technician
    can come and get it going. You can't just plug it in with Windows ME.
    If it wasn't for the ink problem, I'd stick to our old Lexmark.

    Thanks for your help.

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Jan 28, 2006
    #3
  4. geopelia

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:OKHCf.47568$...
    >
    > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > news:1138438075.373293@ftpsrv1...
    >>
    >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> news:ZzACf.38440$...
    >> > I'm thinking of getting a new printer. (inkjet)
    >> > HP PSC 1315 has been recommended. It is a complete printer, scanner
    >> > etc.
    >> > It looks good, but are there any drawbacks to it?
    >> >
    >> > It will mostly be used for printing out emails, letters etc, not
    >> > photos.
    >> >
    >> > Our present printer is a Lexmark, but it is so hard to find ink

    > cartridges
    >> > for it. I did find one eventually, but something inside the cartridge
    >> > (driver?) broke down. I suspect it may have been a refilled one, as it
    >> > just
    >> > had a white label stuck on it, unlike the usual packaging of a new one.
    >> > Same
    >> > price though.
    >> >
    >> > I've got the weekend and Monday to decide.
    >> >
    >> > Thank you.
    >> >
    >> > Geopelia

    >>
    >> Having seen a cheap HP 1410 in action. The scanning is good, and the
    >> printing is good. The bad news on that printer is the alignment of the
    >> pages. Photos get a border that tapers off. Also for photos it leaves a
    >> clear tab on the end of the paper.
    >> Cheap enough to run.
    >>
    >> I like my cheap Canon better. The print quality is slightly better and
    >> it
    >> does borderless prints. Cartidges are cheap enough for both printers.

    > The
    >> Canon has a good LCD display.
    >>
    >> I'd recommend a Canon , but the HP will do a good enough job for what you
    >> want. Funny thing on the HP, every time you change a cartridge the
    >> bugger
    >> wants to print out a test page which it then wants to scan. If it's not
    >> done it will give an error every time you use it and cancel the the
    >> error.
    >>
    >> E. Scrooge
    >>

    >
    > Thank you Scrooge.
    >
    > I wonder if the 1315 is better than the 1410
    >
    > The NetGuide says the scanner is badly aligned. I suppose a bit of trial
    > and
    > error is needed to find out where to put the object to be scanned..
    > I've had a look through our Consumers, but they don't seem to have that
    > model. I'll keep in mind what you say about it wanting to print a test
    > page.
    >
    > HP PSC 1315 is the one our computer shop recommends, and their technician
    > can come and get it going. You can't just plug it in with Windows ME.
    > If it wasn't for the ink problem, I'd stick to our old Lexmark.
    >
    > Thanks for your help.
    >
    > Geopelia


    As long as you've got a USB port you can plug any printer into your PC. The
    software with it will help set it up. In the control Panel under printer
    you can select the right printer or the new driver that's with your new
    printer. It won't take much to get a printer up and running.

    With the all in one printers you don't even need the PC on to copy
    something. Just put it in the scanner and have a piece of paper ready for
    the print out and press either colour copy or black & white copy. Great if
    you want to quickly copy photographs that someone is showing you.
    It will do good photos but the HP with the tab nonsense makes it a bad
    choice for photos.

    The 1315 is probably the next model up from the 1410, be bugger all
    difference.

    One more thing, the HPs feed the paper in the front twist it round a roller
    and spit it back out the front. The Canon takes the paper from the back and
    shoots it straight through to the front. The software with the HP is
    nothing great.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Jan 28, 2006
    #4
  5. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    news:1138445977.126103@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:OKHCf.47568$...
    > >
    > > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > > news:1138438075.373293@ftpsrv1...


    (snip)
    > >
    > > I wonder if the 1315 is better than the 1410
    > >
    > > The NetGuide says the scanner is badly aligned. I suppose a bit of trial
    > > and
    > > error is needed to find out where to put the object to be scanned..
    > > I've had a look through our Consumers, but they don't seem to have that
    > > model. I'll keep in mind what you say about it wanting to print a test
    > > page.
    > >
    > > HP PSC 1315 is the one our computer shop recommends, and their

    technician
    > > can come and get it going. You can't just plug it in with Windows ME.
    > > If it wasn't for the ink problem, I'd stick to our old Lexmark.
    > >
    > > Thanks for your help.
    > >
    > > Geopelia

    >
    > As long as you've got a USB port you can plug any printer into your PC.

    The
    > software with it will help set it up. In the control Panel under printer
    > you can select the right printer or the new driver that's with your new
    > printer. It won't take much to get a printer up and running.
    >
    > With the all in one printers you don't even need the PC on to copy
    > something. Just put it in the scanner and have a piece of paper ready for
    > the print out and press either colour copy or black & white copy. Great

    if
    > you want to quickly copy photographs that someone is showing you.
    > It will do good photos but the HP with the tab nonsense makes it a bad
    > choice for photos.
    >
    > The 1315 is probably the next model up from the 1410, be bugger all
    > difference.
    >
    > One more thing, the HPs feed the paper in the front twist it round a

    roller
    > and spit it back out the front. The Canon takes the paper from the back

    and
    > shoots it straight through to the front. The software with the HP is
    > nothing great.
    >
    > E. Scrooge
    >

    Thank you. I'm saving all this for reference.

    Apparently with XP you can plug a printer straight in, but Windows ME needs
    various things done with discs etc.. Safer to let the computer man do it,
    he can remove some errors at the same time.
    We can't afford anything expensive, and don't really need all the bells and
    whistles.

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Jan 28, 2006
    #5
  6. geopelia

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:p_QCf.49673$...
    >
    > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > news:1138445977.126103@ftpsrv1...
    >>
    >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> news:OKHCf.47568$...
    >> >
    >> > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    >> > news:1138438075.373293@ftpsrv1...

    >
    > (snip)
    >> >
    >> > I wonder if the 1315 is better than the 1410
    >> >
    >> > The NetGuide says the scanner is badly aligned. I suppose a bit of
    >> > trial
    >> > and
    >> > error is needed to find out where to put the object to be scanned..
    >> > I've had a look through our Consumers, but they don't seem to have that
    >> > model. I'll keep in mind what you say about it wanting to print a test
    >> > page.
    >> >
    >> > HP PSC 1315 is the one our computer shop recommends, and their

    > technician
    >> > can come and get it going. You can't just plug it in with Windows ME.
    >> > If it wasn't for the ink problem, I'd stick to our old Lexmark.
    >> >
    >> > Thanks for your help.
    >> >
    >> > Geopelia

    >>
    >> As long as you've got a USB port you can plug any printer into your PC.

    > The
    >> software with it will help set it up. In the control Panel under printer
    >> you can select the right printer or the new driver that's with your new
    >> printer. It won't take much to get a printer up and running.
    >>
    >> With the all in one printers you don't even need the PC on to copy
    >> something. Just put it in the scanner and have a piece of paper ready
    >> for
    >> the print out and press either colour copy or black & white copy. Great

    > if
    >> you want to quickly copy photographs that someone is showing you.
    >> It will do good photos but the HP with the tab nonsense makes it a bad
    >> choice for photos.
    >>
    >> The 1315 is probably the next model up from the 1410, be bugger all
    >> difference.
    >>
    >> One more thing, the HPs feed the paper in the front twist it round a

    > roller
    >> and spit it back out the front. The Canon takes the paper from the back

    > and
    >> shoots it straight through to the front. The software with the HP is
    >> nothing great.
    >>
    >> E. Scrooge
    >>

    > Thank you. I'm saving all this for reference.
    >
    > Apparently with XP you can plug a printer straight in, but Windows ME
    > needs
    > various things done with discs etc.. Safer to let the computer man do it,
    > he can remove some errors at the same time.
    > We can't afford anything expensive, and don't really need all the bells
    > and
    > whistles.
    >
    > Geopelia


    It's not that bad hooking up a printer to Windows 95 & 98. With Windows ME
    it will be much the same. You'll have an install CD with whatever printer
    you buy.
    You can have more than one printer on your computer, but one printer will be
    the default printer while you'll still get to choose the other printer.

    The instructions with a printer are easy enough. Once it's running you'll
    have to install the ink cartridges - real easy on the Canon as the entire
    print head comes out of the printer - put the cartridges in and then replace
    the print head. Also if the print head should pack up a new replacement
    shouldn't be to difficult.

    The instructions with a printer will cover setting up with Windows ME & 98.

    I bought the Canon MP110 because my old scanner packed up. The MP110 being
    a model that's recently been replaced was being sold off cheap at $99. At
    that price there was hardly anything to lose. I had been thinking about
    another Epson printer to replace the faithful ink drinking ESC P2. All the
    new Epsons look good and 6 individual inks has it's pluses and minuses.
    Despite the cheap price the Canon MP110 offers good photo quality. The
    little cartridges were suspect, but they turned out to be real light on ink.
    Only one colour cartidge at around $35 and a bit cheaper for the black one.
    Paper Plus has a special at only $27 for the colour cartridge and about $12
    for the black one - genuine Canon cartridges.

    Can't plug a camera straight into, but I edit the pictures before printing
    them first anyway. Some of the new replacement Canons aren't that much
    dearer. The Canon gives good warning on the cartridge levels, you can see
    them on the LCD display as well.

    No printer will be any harder to install to your computer than any other HP
    printer will be.

    If the computer man is honest he'll know which is the better printer for the
    money. of course the bottom line is that it's your money and your choice.

    It's not like you're trying to fit a new CD writer into your PC all by
    yourself. A printer is only a matter of plugging it in and installing the
    software.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Jan 29, 2006
    #6
  7. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    news:1138499940.321803@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:p_QCf.49673$...
    > >
    > > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > > news:1138445977.126103@ftpsrv1...
    > >>
    > >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:OKHCf.47568$...
    > >> >
    > >> > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > >> > news:1138438075.373293@ftpsrv1...

    > >
    > > (snip)

    >
    > The instructions with a printer are easy enough. Once it's running you'll
    > have to install the ink cartridges - real easy on the Canon as the entire
    > print head comes out of the printer - put the cartridges in and then

    replace
    > the print head. Also if the print head should pack up a new replacement
    > shouldn't be to difficult.
    >
    > The instructions with a printer will cover setting up with Windows ME &

    98.
    >
    > I bought the Canon MP110 because my old scanner packed up. The MP110

    being
    > a model that's recently been replaced was being sold off cheap at $99. At
    > that price there was hardly anything to lose. I had been thinking about
    > another Epson printer to replace the faithful ink drinking ESC P2. All

    the
    > new Epsons look good and 6 individual inks has it's pluses and minuses.
    > Despite the cheap price the Canon MP110 offers good photo quality. The
    > little cartridges were suspect, but they turned out to be real light on

    ink.
    > Only one colour cartidge at around $35 and a bit cheaper for the black

    one.
    > Paper Plus has a special at only $27 for the colour cartridge and about

    $12
    > for the black one - genuine Canon cartridges.
    >
    > Can't plug a camera straight into, but I edit the pictures before printing
    > them first anyway. Some of the new replacement Canons aren't that much
    > dearer. The Canon gives good warning on the cartridge levels, you can see
    > them on the LCD display as well.
    >
    > No printer will be any harder to install to your computer than any other

    HP
    > printer will be.
    >
    > If the computer man is honest he'll know which is the better printer for

    the
    > money. of course the bottom line is that it's your money and your choice.
    >
    > It's not like you're trying to fit a new CD writer into your PC all by
    > yourself. A printer is only a matter of plugging it in and installing the
    > software.
    >
    > E. Scrooge
    >

    The HP is the one the computer shop recommends, so I think I'll try that
    one. I'll see if they have a Canon there first and compare them though. I'll
    save this information about Canon.

    Thank you

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Jan 29, 2006
    #7
  8. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:VJ0Df.69638$...
    >
    > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > news:1138499940.321803@ftpsrv1...
    > >
    > > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > > news:p_QCf.49673$...
    > > >
    > > > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > > > news:1138445977.126103@ftpsrv1...
    > > >>
    > > >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > > >> news:OKHCf.47568$...
    > > >> >
    > > >> > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > > >> > news:1138438075.373293@ftpsrv1...
    > > >
    > > > (snip)

    > >
    > > The instructions with a printer are easy enough. Once it's running

    you'll
    > > have to install the ink cartridges - real easy on the Canon as the

    entire
    > > print head comes out of the printer - put the cartridges in and then

    > replace
    > > the print head. Also if the print head should pack up a new replacement
    > > shouldn't be to difficult.
    > >
    > > The instructions with a printer will cover setting up with Windows ME &

    > 98.
    > >
    > > I bought the Canon MP110 because my old scanner packed up. The MP110

    > being
    > > a model that's recently been replaced was being sold off cheap at $99.

    At
    > > that price there was hardly anything to lose. I had been thinking about
    > > another Epson printer to replace the faithful ink drinking ESC P2. All

    > the
    > > new Epsons look good and 6 individual inks has it's pluses and minuses.
    > > Despite the cheap price the Canon MP110 offers good photo quality. The
    > > little cartridges were suspect, but they turned out to be real light on

    > ink.
    > > Only one colour cartidge at around $35 and a bit cheaper for the black

    > one.
    > > Paper Plus has a special at only $27 for the colour cartridge and about

    > $12
    > > for the black one - genuine Canon cartridges.
    > >
    > > Can't plug a camera straight into, but I edit the pictures before

    printing
    > > them first anyway. Some of the new replacement Canons aren't that much
    > > dearer. The Canon gives good warning on the cartridge levels, you can

    see
    > > them on the LCD display as well.
    > >
    > > No printer will be any harder to install to your computer than any other

    > HP
    > > printer will be.
    > >
    > > If the computer man is honest he'll know which is the better printer for

    > the
    > > money. of course the bottom line is that it's your money and your

    choice.
    > >
    > > It's not like you're trying to fit a new CD writer into your PC all by
    > > yourself. A printer is only a matter of plugging it in and installing

    the
    > > software.
    > >
    > > E. Scrooge
    > >

    > The HP is the one the computer shop recommends, so I think I'll try that
    > one. I'll see if they have a Canon there first and compare them though.

    I'll
    > save this information about Canon.
    >
    > Thank you
    >
    > Geopelia
    >
    >

    I have bought the HP PSC 1315 and the computer man is calling tomorrow to
    install it. Been reading the user guide, it will be very handy if we ever
    buy a digital camera.

    Whether I will have the brains to use it for any more than simple printing
    remains to be seen!

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Jan 31, 2006
    #8
  9. geopelia

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:mYPDf.104956$...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:VJ0Df.69638$...
    >> >

    >> The HP is the one the computer shop recommends, so I think I'll try that
    >> one. I'll see if they have a Canon there first and compare them though.

    > I'll
    >> save this information about Canon.
    >>
    >> Thank you
    >>
    >> Geopelia
    >>
    >>

    > I have bought the HP PSC 1315 and the computer man is calling tomorrow to
    > install it. Been reading the user guide, it will be very handy if we ever
    > buy a digital camera.
    >
    > Whether I will have the brains to use it for any more than simple printing
    > remains to be seen!
    >
    > Geopelia


    A digital camera is the next step, and when you do get one you really will
    be glad that you did. Expect to pay around $300 for a good camera (damn
    near anything but a Kodak). 4 megapixels is enough, but even a 3 megapixel
    will give good results if it's a Canon like a friend bought a few weeks ago.
    I have a 4 mp Olympus, just before Olympus dumped the viewfinder from it's
    latest models.
    Never buy a digital that doesn't have a viewfinder, trying to see the LCD
    screen on the back of it outside in the sun is a bad joke.
    The main thing to get with a new camera is a 128MB memory card for it. Also
    a Nimh charger and Nimh AA batteries. Energizer has a cheap one with 2
    decent AA 2500 batteries with it at the suprermarkets for just over $30.
    Once you get over the initial expenses the rest of your photography will be
    really cheap and you'll have full control over what you print. You can crop
    away a lot of background to show more of your subject in in your prints. My
    friend is enjoying his new camera a lot, just took a while to get him to
    take plenty of photos each time he used it. As he doesn't have to be stingy
    like some people are making each shot count on a film camera. Gives him
    more shots to choose the best from afterwards as well.

    You might as well get a camera while you're still around to enjoy it. Don't
    rush into it though, have a good look around first they all have different
    features. The main thing that isn't good on my friend's new Canon is that
    irt doesn't have a seperate zoom button for the lens, you can easily change
    the settings while trying to zoom if not real careful. Also it can't be
    plugged straight into a TV set for viewing the shots to a few people.
    Dick Smith have some good genuine specials from time to time.

    With the printer. All you'll have to do is plug it in - run the install
    software CD - then fit the new ink cartridges while it's switched on so it
    can move the print head into position for you. The instructions are quite
    clear - the basic instruction guide will sooon have it going.

    It shouldn't take more than 10 minutes to have it running with the software
    installed. And a decent computer guy wouldn't even charge you for such a
    simple service - unless he had to travel over 40 miles to get to you.

    Here's the cheap Canon I suggested for my friend, it does all he needs:
    http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/43e017ce09c37e14273fc0a87f990718/Product/View/XG3009

    It's good small camera that can be taken anywhere. The website is wrong
    abong about it having a 2 inch screen. It's got a 1.5 inch screen.
    When you buy a camera you might like a slightly bigger screen to see the
    settings with. The display on the Canon is fairly clear for it's size, and
    is an easy point and shoot camera. The viewfinder is big and clear.
    Just take the time to check out different good brands when you decide to
    look at getting one, some might be easier to use than other.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Feb 1, 2006
    #9
  10. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    news:1138760414.719948@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:mYPDf.104956$...
    > >
    > > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > > news:VJ0Df.69638$...
    > >>

    > > I have bought the HP PSC 1315 and the computer man is calling tomorrow

    to
    > > install it. Been reading the user guide, it will be very handy if we

    ever
    > > buy a digital camera.
    > >
    > > Whether I will have the brains to use it for any more than simple

    printing
    > > remains to be seen!
    > >
    > > Geopelia

    >
    > A digital camera is the next step, and when you do get one you really will
    > be glad that you did. Expect to pay around $300 for a good camera (damn
    > near anything but a Kodak). 4 megapixels is enough, but even a 3

    megapixel
    > will give good results if it's a Canon like a friend bought a few weeks

    ago.
    > I have a 4 mp Olympus, just before Olympus dumped the viewfinder from it's
    > latest models.
    > Never buy a digital that doesn't have a viewfinder, trying to see the LCD
    > screen on the back of it outside in the sun is a bad joke.
    > The main thing to get with a new camera is a 128MB memory card for it.

    Also
    > a Nimh charger and Nimh AA batteries. Energizer has a cheap one with 2
    > decent AA 2500 batteries with it at the suprermarkets for just over $30.
    > Once you get over the initial expenses the rest of your photography will

    be
    > really cheap and you'll have full control over what you print. You can

    crop
    > away a lot of background to show more of your subject in in your prints.

    My
    > friend is enjoying his new camera a lot, just took a while to get him to
    > take plenty of photos each time he used it. As he doesn't have to be

    stingy
    > like some people are making each shot count on a film camera. Gives him
    > more shots to choose the best from afterwards as well.
    >
    > You might as well get a camera while you're still around to enjoy it.

    Don't
    > rush into it though, have a good look around first they all have different
    > features. The main thing that isn't good on my friend's new Canon is that
    > irt doesn't have a seperate zoom button for the lens, you can easily

    change
    > the settings while trying to zoom if not real careful. Also it can't be
    > plugged straight into a TV set for viewing the shots to a few people.
    > Dick Smith have some good genuine specials from time to time.
    >
    > With the printer. All you'll have to do is plug it in - run the install
    > software CD - then fit the new ink cartridges while it's switched on so it
    > can move the print head into position for you. The instructions are quite
    > clear - the basic instruction guide will sooon have it going.
    >
    > It shouldn't take more than 10 minutes to have it running with the

    software
    > installed. And a decent computer guy wouldn't even charge you for such a
    > simple service - unless he had to travel over 40 miles to get to you.
    >
    > Here's the cheap Canon I suggested for my friend, it does all he needs:
    >

    http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/43e017ce09c37e14273fc0a87f990718/Product/View/XG3009
    >
    > It's good small camera that can be taken anywhere. The website is wrong
    > abong about it having a 2 inch screen. It's got a 1.5 inch screen.
    > When you buy a camera you might like a slightly bigger screen to see the
    > settings with. The display on the Canon is fairly clear for it's size,

    and
    > is an easy point and shoot camera. The viewfinder is big and clear.
    > Just take the time to check out different good brands when you decide to
    > look at getting one, some might be easier to use than other.
    >
    > E. Scrooge
    >

    Thank you for that very full description, I'll save it. I suppose a digital
    camera will be next, but I have to pay over $500 for new glasses (bifocal
    and darkening) so it will be a while yet. I like to photograph birds, so
    I'll need a zoom. We have Netguide and Consumer to compare the different
    models, but it's good to hear from people who have tried them.

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Feb 1, 2006
    #10
  11. geopelia

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:T6WDf.105026$...
    >
    > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > news:1138760414.719948@ftpsrv1...
    >>
    >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> news:mYPDf.104956$...
    >> >
    >> > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:VJ0Df.69638$...
    >> >>
    >> > I have bought the HP PSC 1315 and the computer man is calling tomorrow

    > to
    >> > install it. Been reading the user guide, it will be very handy if we

    > ever
    >> > buy a digital camera.
    >> >
    >> > Whether I will have the brains to use it for any more than simple

    > printing
    >> > remains to be seen!
    >> >
    >> > Geopelia

    >>
    >> A digital camera is the next step, and when you do get one you really
    >> will
    >> be glad that you did. Expect to pay around $300 for a good camera (damn
    >> near anything but a Kodak). 4 megapixels is enough, but even a 3

    > megapixel
    >> will give good results if it's a Canon like a friend bought a few weeks

    > ago.
    >> I have a 4 mp Olympus, just before Olympus dumped the viewfinder from
    >> it's
    >> latest models.
    >> Never buy a digital that doesn't have a viewfinder, trying to see the LCD
    >> screen on the back of it outside in the sun is a bad joke.
    >> The main thing to get with a new camera is a 128MB memory card for it.

    > Also
    >> a Nimh charger and Nimh AA batteries. Energizer has a cheap one with 2
    >> decent AA 2500 batteries with it at the suprermarkets for just over $30.
    >> Once you get over the initial expenses the rest of your photography will

    > be
    >> really cheap and you'll have full control over what you print. You can

    > crop
    >> away a lot of background to show more of your subject in in your prints.

    > My
    >> friend is enjoying his new camera a lot, just took a while to get him to
    >> take plenty of photos each time he used it. As he doesn't have to be

    > stingy
    >> like some people are making each shot count on a film camera. Gives him
    >> more shots to choose the best from afterwards as well.
    >>
    >> You might as well get a camera while you're still around to enjoy it.

    > Don't
    >> rush into it though, have a good look around first they all have
    >> different
    >> features. The main thing that isn't good on my friend's new Canon is
    >> that
    >> irt doesn't have a seperate zoom button for the lens, you can easily

    > change
    >> the settings while trying to zoom if not real careful. Also it can't be
    >> plugged straight into a TV set for viewing the shots to a few people.
    >> Dick Smith have some good genuine specials from time to time.
    >>
    >> With the printer. All you'll have to do is plug it in - run the install
    >> software CD - then fit the new ink cartridges while it's switched on so
    >> it
    >> can move the print head into position for you. The instructions are
    >> quite
    >> clear - the basic instruction guide will sooon have it going.
    >>
    >> It shouldn't take more than 10 minutes to have it running with the

    > software
    >> installed. And a decent computer guy wouldn't even charge you for such a
    >> simple service - unless he had to travel over 40 miles to get to you.
    >>
    >> Here's the cheap Canon I suggested for my friend, it does all he needs:
    >>

    > http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/43e017ce09c37e14273fc0a87f990718/Product/View/XG3009
    >>
    >> It's good small camera that can be taken anywhere. The website is wrong
    >> abong about it having a 2 inch screen. It's got a 1.5 inch screen.
    >> When you buy a camera you might like a slightly bigger screen to see the
    >> settings with. The display on the Canon is fairly clear for it's size,

    > and
    >> is an easy point and shoot camera. The viewfinder is big and clear.
    >> Just take the time to check out different good brands when you decide to
    >> look at getting one, some might be easier to use than other.
    >>
    >> E. Scrooge
    >>

    > Thank you for that very full description, I'll save it. I suppose a
    > digital
    > camera will be next, but I have to pay over $500 for new glasses (bifocal
    > and darkening) so it will be a while yet. I like to photograph birds, so
    > I'll need a zoom. We have Netguide and Consumer to compare the different
    > models, but it's good to hear from people who have tried them.
    >
    > Geopelia


    The little cameras have a 3 X optical zoom, but you'll probably be better
    with a 10 or 12 X zoom. A cheap Panasonic model that has an image
    stabilizer to make for nice clear shots.
    It just depends how far away you are from the birds. Don't worry about the
    digital zoom that cameras offer on top of the optical zoom. Digital zoom
    simply isn't worth using.
    Some cameras take pretty good video clips. Mine doesn't, it's video is low
    resolution crap. The Canon takes good 640 x 480 video clips, the frame rate
    could be slightly better and it doesn't have sound. If you want reasonable
    video as well from the still camera look around very carefully.
    Some smaller cameras have 6 X zoom which may be enough for your needs. I've
    told my friend to put a note in his car to remind if should be taking the
    camera with him. The more use he gets out of it the better the value.

    Best bird shot I've taken with mine was of a seagull that was slowly gliding
    towards me at about head height. I had the camera set on multi shots taking
    about 3 pictures a second. A lot of my shots are usually close up ones of
    bees, butterflies, and certain creepy crawlies. The Olympus has 2 Macro
    settings, the second setting gets some amazing pictures.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Feb 1, 2006
    #11
  12. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    news:1138770414.320730@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:T6WDf.105026$...
    > >
    > > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > > news:1138760414.719948@ftpsrv1...
    > >>
    > >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:mYPDf.104956$...
    > >> >
    > >> > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > >> > news:VJ0Df.69638$...
    > >> >>
    > >> > I have bought the HP PSC 1315 and the computer man is calling

    tomorrow
    > > to
    > >> > install it. Been reading the user guide, it will be very handy if we

    > > ever
    > >> > buy a digital camera.
    > >> >
    > >> > Whether I will have the brains to use it for any more than simple

    > > printing
    > >> > remains to be seen!
    > >> >
    > >> > Geopelia
    > >>
    > >> A digital camera is the next step, and when you do get one you really
    > >> will
    > >> be glad that you did. Expect to pay around $300 for a good camera

    (damn
    > >> near anything but a Kodak). 4 megapixels is enough, but even a 3

    > > megapixel
    > >> will give good results if it's a Canon like a friend bought a few weeks

    > > ago.
    > >> I have a 4 mp Olympus, just before Olympus dumped the viewfinder from
    > >> it's
    > >> latest models.
    > >> Never buy a digital that doesn't have a viewfinder, trying to see the

    LCD
    > >> screen on the back of it outside in the sun is a bad joke.
    > >> The main thing to get with a new camera is a 128MB memory card for it.

    > > Also
    > >> a Nimh charger and Nimh AA batteries. Energizer has a cheap one with 2
    > >> decent AA 2500 batteries with it at the suprermarkets for just over

    $30.
    > >> Once you get over the initial expenses the rest of your photography

    will
    > > be
    > >> really cheap and you'll have full control over what you print. You can

    > > crop
    > >> away a lot of background to show more of your subject in in your

    prints.
    > > My
    > >> friend is enjoying his new camera a lot, just took a while to get him

    to
    > >> take plenty of photos each time he used it. As he doesn't have to be

    > > stingy
    > >> like some people are making each shot count on a film camera. Gives

    him
    > >> more shots to choose the best from afterwards as well.
    > >>
    > >> You might as well get a camera while you're still around to enjoy it.

    > > Don't
    > >> rush into it though, have a good look around first they all have
    > >> different
    > >> features. The main thing that isn't good on my friend's new Canon is
    > >> that
    > >> irt doesn't have a seperate zoom button for the lens, you can easily

    > > change
    > >> the settings while trying to zoom if not real careful. Also it can't

    be
    > >> plugged straight into a TV set for viewing the shots to a few people.
    > >> Dick Smith have some good genuine specials from time to time.
    > >>
    > >> With the printer. All you'll have to do is plug it in - run the

    install
    > >> software CD - then fit the new ink cartridges while it's switched on so
    > >> it
    > >> can move the print head into position for you. The instructions are
    > >> quite
    > >> clear - the basic instruction guide will sooon have it going.
    > >>
    > >> It shouldn't take more than 10 minutes to have it running with the

    > > software
    > >> installed. And a decent computer guy wouldn't even charge you for such

    a
    > >> simple service - unless he had to travel over 40 miles to get to you.
    > >>
    > >> Here's the cheap Canon I suggested for my friend, it does all he needs:
    > >>

    > >

    http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/43e017ce09c37e14273fc0a87f990718/Product/View/XG3009
    > >>
    > >> It's good small camera that can be taken anywhere. The website is

    wrong
    > >> abong about it having a 2 inch screen. It's got a 1.5 inch screen.
    > >> When you buy a camera you might like a slightly bigger screen to see

    the
    > >> settings with. The display on the Canon is fairly clear for it's size,

    > > and
    > >> is an easy point and shoot camera. The viewfinder is big and clear.
    > >> Just take the time to check out different good brands when you decide

    to
    > >> look at getting one, some might be easier to use than other.
    > >>
    > >> E. Scrooge
    > >>

    > > Thank you for that very full description, I'll save it. I suppose a
    > > digital
    > > camera will be next, but I have to pay over $500 for new glasses

    (bifocal
    > > and darkening) so it will be a while yet. I like to photograph birds, so
    > > I'll need a zoom. We have Netguide and Consumer to compare the different
    > > models, but it's good to hear from people who have tried them.
    > >
    > > Geopelia

    >
    > The little cameras have a 3 X optical zoom, but you'll probably be better
    > with a 10 or 12 X zoom. A cheap Panasonic model that has an image
    > stabilizer to make for nice clear shots.
    > It just depends how far away you are from the birds. Don't worry about

    the
    > digital zoom that cameras offer on top of the optical zoom. Digital zoom
    > simply isn't worth using.
    > Some cameras take pretty good video clips. Mine doesn't, it's video is

    low
    > resolution crap. The Canon takes good 640 x 480 video clips, the frame

    rate
    > could be slightly better and it doesn't have sound. If you want

    reasonable
    > video as well from the still camera look around very carefully.
    > Some smaller cameras have 6 X zoom which may be enough for your needs.

    I've
    > told my friend to put a note in his car to remind if should be taking the
    > camera with him. The more use he gets out of it the better the value.
    >
    > Best bird shot I've taken with mine was of a seagull that was slowly

    gliding
    > towards me at about head height. I had the camera set on multi shots

    taking
    > about 3 pictures a second. A lot of my shots are usually close up ones of
    > bees, butterflies, and certain creepy crawlies. The Olympus has 2 Macro
    > settings, the second setting gets some amazing pictures.
    >
    > E. Scrooge
    >

    Thank you. For us it is a matter of price, so we'll have to look at all the
    models available when we decide to buy one. More seem to be coming out all
    the time. It would have to be compatible with the new printer and this
    computer. I'll save this information.
    Geopelia
    geopelia, Feb 1, 2006
    #12
  13. geopelia

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:ue0Ef.105695$...
    >
    > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > news:1138770414.320730@ftpsrv1...
    >>
    >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> news:T6WDf.105026$...
    >> >
    >> > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    >> > news:1138760414.719948@ftpsrv1...
    >> >>
    >> >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> >> news:mYPDf.104956$...
    >> >> >
    >> >> > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> >> > news:VJ0Df.69638$...
    >> >> >>
    >> >> > I have bought the HP PSC 1315 and the computer man is calling

    > tomorrow
    >> > to
    >> >> > install it. Been reading the user guide, it will be very handy if
    >> >> > we
    >> > ever
    >> >> > buy a digital camera.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Whether I will have the brains to use it for any more than simple
    >> > printing
    >> >> > remains to be seen!
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Geopelia
    >> >>
    >> >> A digital camera is the next step, and when you do get one you really
    >> >> will
    >> >> be glad that you did. Expect to pay around $300 for a good camera

    > (damn
    >> >> near anything but a Kodak). 4 megapixels is enough, but even a 3
    >> > megapixel
    >> >> will give good results if it's a Canon like a friend bought a few
    >> >> weeks
    >> > ago.
    >> >> I have a 4 mp Olympus, just before Olympus dumped the viewfinder from
    >> >> it's
    >> >> latest models.
    >> >> Never buy a digital that doesn't have a viewfinder, trying to see the

    > LCD
    >> >> screen on the back of it outside in the sun is a bad joke.
    >> >> The main thing to get with a new camera is a 128MB memory card for it.
    >> > Also
    >> >> a Nimh charger and Nimh AA batteries. Energizer has a cheap one with
    >> >> 2
    >> >> decent AA 2500 batteries with it at the suprermarkets for just over

    > $30.
    >> >> Once you get over the initial expenses the rest of your photography

    > will
    >> > be
    >> >> really cheap and you'll have full control over what you print. You
    >> >> can
    >> > crop
    >> >> away a lot of background to show more of your subject in in your

    > prints.
    >> > My
    >> >> friend is enjoying his new camera a lot, just took a while to get him

    > to
    >> >> take plenty of photos each time he used it. As he doesn't have to be
    >> > stingy
    >> >> like some people are making each shot count on a film camera. Gives

    > him
    >> >> more shots to choose the best from afterwards as well.
    >> >>
    >> >> You might as well get a camera while you're still around to enjoy it.
    >> > Don't
    >> >> rush into it though, have a good look around first they all have
    >> >> different
    >> >> features. The main thing that isn't good on my friend's new Canon is
    >> >> that
    >> >> irt doesn't have a seperate zoom button for the lens, you can easily
    >> > change
    >> >> the settings while trying to zoom if not real careful. Also it can't

    > be
    >> >> plugged straight into a TV set for viewing the shots to a few people.
    >> >> Dick Smith have some good genuine specials from time to time.
    >> >>
    >> >> With the printer. All you'll have to do is plug it in - run the

    > install
    >> >> software CD - then fit the new ink cartridges while it's switched on
    >> >> so
    >> >> it
    >> >> can move the print head into position for you. The instructions are
    >> >> quite
    >> >> clear - the basic instruction guide will sooon have it going.
    >> >>
    >> >> It shouldn't take more than 10 minutes to have it running with the
    >> > software
    >> >> installed. And a decent computer guy wouldn't even charge you for
    >> >> such

    > a
    >> >> simple service - unless he had to travel over 40 miles to get to you.
    >> >>
    >> >> Here's the cheap Canon I suggested for my friend, it does all he
    >> >> needs:
    >> >>
    >> >

    > http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/43e017ce09c37e14273fc0a87f990718/Product/View/XG3009
    >> >>
    >> >> It's good small camera that can be taken anywhere. The website is

    > wrong
    >> >> abong about it having a 2 inch screen. It's got a 1.5 inch screen.
    >> >> When you buy a camera you might like a slightly bigger screen to see

    > the
    >> >> settings with. The display on the Canon is fairly clear for it's
    >> >> size,
    >> > and
    >> >> is an easy point and shoot camera. The viewfinder is big and clear.
    >> >> Just take the time to check out different good brands when you decide

    > to
    >> >> look at getting one, some might be easier to use than other.
    >> >>
    >> >> E. Scrooge
    >> >>
    >> > Thank you for that very full description, I'll save it. I suppose a
    >> > digital
    >> > camera will be next, but I have to pay over $500 for new glasses

    > (bifocal
    >> > and darkening) so it will be a while yet. I like to photograph birds,
    >> > so
    >> > I'll need a zoom. We have Netguide and Consumer to compare the
    >> > different
    >> > models, but it's good to hear from people who have tried them.
    >> >
    >> > Geopelia

    >>
    >> The little cameras have a 3 X optical zoom, but you'll probably be better
    >> with a 10 or 12 X zoom. A cheap Panasonic model that has an image
    >> stabilizer to make for nice clear shots.
    >> It just depends how far away you are from the birds. Don't worry about

    > the
    >> digital zoom that cameras offer on top of the optical zoom. Digital zoom
    >> simply isn't worth using.
    >> Some cameras take pretty good video clips. Mine doesn't, it's video is

    > low
    >> resolution crap. The Canon takes good 640 x 480 video clips, the frame

    > rate
    >> could be slightly better and it doesn't have sound. If you want

    > reasonable
    >> video as well from the still camera look around very carefully.
    >> Some smaller cameras have 6 X zoom which may be enough for your needs.

    > I've
    >> told my friend to put a note in his car to remind if should be taking the
    >> camera with him. The more use he gets out of it the better the value.
    >>
    >> Best bird shot I've taken with mine was of a seagull that was slowly

    > gliding
    >> towards me at about head height. I had the camera set on multi shots

    > taking
    >> about 3 pictures a second. A lot of my shots are usually close up ones
    >> of
    >> bees, butterflies, and certain creepy crawlies. The Olympus has 2 Macro
    >> settings, the second setting gets some amazing pictures.
    >>
    >> E. Scrooge
    >>

    > Thank you. For us it is a matter of price, so we'll have to look at all
    > the
    > models available when we decide to buy one. More seem to be coming out all
    > the time. It would have to be compatible with the new printer and this
    > computer. I'll save this information.
    > Geopelia


    As long as the PC has USB ports any camera will plug into it. Plugging
    directly to the printer doesn't matter much unless you don't want to edit
    the pictures first by getting rid of a lot of background to make the
    subjects a bigger part of the pictures.

    A compact camera you're liable to get more use of as it's a lot easier to
    cart round. A bigger camera woth zoom will need a shoulder bag, you're more
    likely to leave it at home except for certain times.
    For price and more practical uses overall go for a cheap small brand name
    (not Kodak) for starters. Later on you can look at a bigger zoom camera if
    you think you'll get enough use out of it.
    A 4 mp camera gives a picture resolution of around 2,288 X 1,712. In one
    shot of thaqt size you can get 2 different pictures out of it if there are
    more than one subject in parts of the original picture.
    A 128MB card will store over 100 good quality pictures, or a bit under 50
    best quality pictures. You just erase the card after downloading the
    pictures you want. You'll take far more pictures than you ever did with a
    film camera, as there are no more big costs and no more running around
    getting films developed into little prints. You can do good quality A4
    pints on your printer. The size would cost a lot if was film at a photo
    shop.
    You can even go much larger than A4 on your printer by selecting poster
    mode - one setting will put a quarter of the picture on 4 sheets of A4
    paper.
    Juist don't expect to do nice borderless prints on a cheap HP printer. The
    quality will still be pretty good though.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Feb 1, 2006
    #13
  14. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    news:1138793256.593070@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:ue0Ef.105695$...
    > >
    > > Thank you. For us it is a matter of price, so we'll have to look at all
    > > the
    > > models available when we decide to buy one. More seem to be coming out

    all
    > > the time. It would have to be compatible with the new printer and this
    > > computer. I'll save this information.
    > > Geopelia

    >
    > As long as the PC has USB ports any camera will plug into it. Plugging
    > directly to the printer doesn't matter much unless you don't want to edit
    > the pictures first by getting rid of a lot of background to make the
    > subjects a bigger part of the pictures.
    >
    > A compact camera you're liable to get more use of as it's a lot easier to
    > cart round. A bigger camera woth zoom will need a shoulder bag, you're

    more
    > likely to leave it at home except for certain times.
    > For price and more practical uses overall go for a cheap small brand name
    > (not Kodak) for starters. Later on you can look at a bigger zoom camera

    if
    > you think you'll get enough use out of it.
    > A 4 mp camera gives a picture resolution of around 2,288 X 1,712. In one
    > shot of thaqt size you can get 2 different pictures out of it if there are
    > more than one subject in parts of the original picture.
    > A 128MB card will store over 100 good quality pictures, or a bit under 50
    > best quality pictures. You just erase the card after downloading the
    > pictures you want. You'll take far more pictures than you ever did with a
    > film camera, as there are no more big costs and no more running around
    > getting films developed into little prints. You can do good quality A4
    > pints on your printer. The size would cost a lot if was film at a photo
    > shop.
    > You can even go much larger than A4 on your printer by selecting poster
    > mode - one setting will put a quarter of the picture on 4 sheets of A4
    > paper.
    > Juist don't expect to do nice borderless prints on a cheap HP printer.

    The
    > quality will still be pretty good though.
    >
    > E. Scrooge
    >


    The computer man has just installed the HP (I could never have managed it)
    and I have printed out an email without stuffing up the machine. Progress!

    There is a PictBridge socket on the front and instructions for it in the
    User Guide, so we would look for a camera that would use it. (That's a long
    way off yet though, got to save up again.)

    Hubby says "Why not Kodak?" Isn't it compatible with HP?

    The user guide is great, it's in American English not Asian English. Very
    comprehensive.

    Thanks for all your help.

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Feb 1, 2006
    #14
  15. geopelia

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:flbEf.106176$...
    >
    > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > news:1138793256.593070@ftpsrv1...
    >>
    >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> news:ue0Ef.105695$...
    >> >
    >> > Thank you. For us it is a matter of price, so we'll have to look at
    >> > all
    >> > the
    >> > models available when we decide to buy one. More seem to be coming out

    > all
    >> > the time. It would have to be compatible with the new printer and this
    >> > computer. I'll save this information.
    >> > Geopelia

    >>
    >> As long as the PC has USB ports any camera will plug into it. Plugging
    >> directly to the printer doesn't matter much unless you don't want to edit
    >> the pictures first by getting rid of a lot of background to make the
    >> subjects a bigger part of the pictures.
    >>
    >> A compact camera you're liable to get more use of as it's a lot easier to
    >> cart round. A bigger camera woth zoom will need a shoulder bag, you're

    > more
    >> likely to leave it at home except for certain times.
    >> For price and more practical uses overall go for a cheap small brand name
    >> (not Kodak) for starters. Later on you can look at a bigger zoom camera

    > if
    >> you think you'll get enough use out of it.
    >> A 4 mp camera gives a picture resolution of around 2,288 X 1,712. In one
    >> shot of thaqt size you can get 2 different pictures out of it if there
    >> are
    >> more than one subject in parts of the original picture.
    >> A 128MB card will store over 100 good quality pictures, or a bit under 50
    >> best quality pictures. You just erase the card after downloading the
    >> pictures you want. You'll take far more pictures than you ever did with
    >> a
    >> film camera, as there are no more big costs and no more running around
    >> getting films developed into little prints. You can do good quality A4
    >> pints on your printer. The size would cost a lot if was film at a photo
    >> shop.
    >> You can even go much larger than A4 on your printer by selecting poster
    >> mode - one setting will put a quarter of the picture on 4 sheets of A4
    >> paper.
    >> Juist don't expect to do nice borderless prints on a cheap HP printer.

    > The
    >> quality will still be pretty good though.
    >>
    >> E. Scrooge
    >>

    >
    > The computer man has just installed the HP (I could never have managed it)
    > and I have printed out an email without stuffing up the machine. Progress!
    >
    > There is a PictBridge socket on the front and instructions for it in the
    > User Guide, so we would look for a camera that would use it. (That's a
    > long
    > way off yet though, got to save up again.)
    >
    > Hubby says "Why not Kodak?" Isn't it compatible with HP?
    >
    > The user guide is great, it's in American English not Asian English. Very
    > comprehensive.
    >
    > Thanks for all your help.
    >
    > Geopelia


    There's been enough people complaining about faults with Kodak cameras and
    bad service when it comes to trying to get them fixed.
    There's not much difference in price for the good brand names.

    For a quick print of picture from your camera the PictBridge could be
    useful. The PC with the right software is best for editing the pictures -
    removing background - changing the brightness and even sharpness of a
    picture before printing.
    Most new cameras these days will use the PictBridge - it's a standard on
    most printers.

    Installing the printing only appeared to be difficult because you've never
    had a go at it - the unknown worried you about going through the simple
    steps yourself.
    Learning what can be done on it with all the settings is going to take a bit
    more time and patience. Only photos need to be done on the best print
    quality setting and not on plain paper. You don't need to use the best HP
    paper on your printer either.
    A fool I know of went and got a cheap Kodak camera, then went to a digital
    camera session at her local Senior Net. The camera will give good results
    and could be quite reliable for her if she's lucky. Had she gone to Senior
    Net first she would've learnt what others are using and learnt that it
    would've been better to get a model that has an optical zoom instead of the
    model she's got that has no optical zoom at all. She's not happy probably
    won't be long before she buys another camera. The choice she made will
    still do as cheap point and shoot camera.

    Many programs you've got will be able to use your printer.
    Take time to read up and get familiar with the HP software that came with
    your printer. Part of that software lets you make your own custom 12 month
    calendars.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Feb 2, 2006
    #15
  16. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    news:1138841860.61910@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:flbEf.106176$...
    > >
    > > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > > news:1138793256.593070@ftpsrv1...
    > >>
    > >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:ue0Ef.105695$...
    > >> >

    > > There is a PictBridge socket on the front and instructions for it in the
    > > User Guide, so we would look for a camera that would use it. (That's a
    > > long
    > > way off yet though, got to save up again.)
    > >
    > > Hubby says "Why not Kodak?" Isn't it compatible with HP?
    > >
    > > The user guide is great, it's in American English not Asian English.

    Very
    > > comprehensive.
    > >
    > > Thanks for all your help.
    > >
    > > Geopelia

    >
    > There's been enough people complaining about faults with Kodak cameras and
    > bad service when it comes to trying to get them fixed.
    > There's not much difference in price for the good brand names.
    >
    > For a quick print of picture from your camera the PictBridge could be
    > useful. The PC with the right software is best for editing the pictures -
    > removing background - changing the brightness and even sharpness of a
    > picture before printing.
    > Most new cameras these days will use the PictBridge - it's a standard on
    > most printers.
    >
    > Installing the printing only appeared to be difficult because you've never
    > had a go at it - the unknown worried you about going through the simple
    > steps yourself.
    > Learning what can be done on it with all the settings is going to take a

    bit
    > more time and patience. Only photos need to be done on the best print
    > quality setting and not on plain paper. You don't need to use the best HP
    > paper on your printer either.
    > A fool I know of went and got a cheap Kodak camera, then went to a digital
    > camera session at her local Senior Net. The camera will give good results


    > and could be quite reliable for her if she's lucky. Had she gone to

    Senior
    > Net first she would've learnt what others are using and learnt that it
    > would've been better to get a model that has an optical zoom instead of

    the
    > model she's got that has no optical zoom at all. She's not happy probably
    > won't be long before she buys another camera. The choice she made will
    > still do as cheap point and shoot camera.
    >
    > Many programs you've got will be able to use your printer.
    > Take time to read up and get familiar with the HP software that came with
    > your printer. Part of that software lets you make your own custom 12

    month
    > calendars.
    >
    > E. Scrooge
    >
    >

    Thank you. I suppose people buy Kodak because it is cheap. I've got a lot of
    information saved on various cameras.
    I'll try scanning some photos next.

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Feb 2, 2006
    #16
  17. geopelia

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:H5lEf.119326$...
    >
    > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > news:1138841860.61910@ftpsrv1...
    >>
    >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> news:flbEf.106176$...
    >> >
    >> > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    >> > news:1138793256.593070@ftpsrv1...
    >> >>
    >> >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> >> news:ue0Ef.105695$...
    >> >> >
    >> > There is a PictBridge socket on the front and instructions for it in
    >> > the
    >> > User Guide, so we would look for a camera that would use it. (That's a
    >> > long
    >> > way off yet though, got to save up again.)
    >> >
    >> > Hubby says "Why not Kodak?" Isn't it compatible with HP?
    >> >
    >> > The user guide is great, it's in American English not Asian English.

    > Very
    >> > comprehensive.
    >> >
    >> > Thanks for all your help.
    >> >
    >> > Geopelia

    >>
    >> There's been enough people complaining about faults with Kodak cameras
    >> and
    >> bad service when it comes to trying to get them fixed.
    >> There's not much difference in price for the good brand names.
    >>
    >> For a quick print of picture from your camera the PictBridge could be
    >> useful. The PC with the right software is best for editing the
    >> pictures -
    >> removing background - changing the brightness and even sharpness of a
    >> picture before printing.
    >> Most new cameras these days will use the PictBridge - it's a standard on
    >> most printers.
    >>
    >> Installing the printing only appeared to be difficult because you've
    >> never
    >> had a go at it - the unknown worried you about going through the simple
    >> steps yourself.
    >> Learning what can be done on it with all the settings is going to take a

    > bit
    >> more time and patience. Only photos need to be done on the best print
    >> quality setting and not on plain paper. You don't need to use the best
    >> HP
    >> paper on your printer either.
    >> A fool I know of went and got a cheap Kodak camera, then went to a
    >> digital
    >> camera session at her local Senior Net. The camera will give good
    >> results

    >
    >> and could be quite reliable for her if she's lucky. Had she gone to

    > Senior
    >> Net first she would've learnt what others are using and learnt that it
    >> would've been better to get a model that has an optical zoom instead of

    > the
    >> model she's got that has no optical zoom at all. She's not happy
    >> probably
    >> won't be long before she buys another camera. The choice she made will
    >> still do as cheap point and shoot camera.
    >>
    >> Many programs you've got will be able to use your printer.
    >> Take time to read up and get familiar with the HP software that came with
    >> your printer. Part of that software lets you make your own custom 12

    > month
    >> calendars.
    >>
    >> E. Scrooge
    >>
    >>

    > Thank you. I suppose people buy Kodak because it is cheap. I've got a lot
    > of
    > information saved on various cameras.
    > I'll try scanning some photos next.
    >
    > Geopelia


    To copy a photograph.
    Put it in the scanner
    Select paper to photo - the semi gloss paper is cheap enough.
    Select colour copy
    From memory on the 1410.

    Handy if someone has a few pictures to show you, in a couple of minutes you
    can have your own copies. No need to even turn on the PC, just the printer
    when doing a direct copy.

    A few Kodak models look pretty good, but the reports of the cameras packing
    up in some cases is a bit off putting.
    Of course there's the chance that any camera could pack up, but more likely
    some brands have better quality control than others. Non camera brand that
    compares well seems to be Panasonic.

    When scanning a photo select a resolution of 600 or even 1200 if the MBs
    won't be too high. It will give a very large picture on the computer but
    the more detail the better. After that you can resample the picture down to
    better viewing size. A low resolution scan won't get the best results.
    First thing though is the quick pre-scan it then shows a broken scan border
    round a little picture. If the border shows what you want in the picture
    without moving the sides of the border to suit, then you can do the main
    high resolution scan.

    You'll have fun.
    The real hard work is when having to restore badly damaged old black and
    white photos. The results are worth it when one sees the improvements.
    Some old photos are usually bright and badly faded. PSP soon restores them.

    You should get good value and fun out of your printer.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Feb 2, 2006
    #17
  18. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    news:1138880174.684648@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:H5lEf.119326$...
    > >
    > > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > > news:1138841860.61910@ftpsrv1...
    > >>
    > >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > >>

    > > Thank you. I suppose people buy Kodak because it is cheap. I've got a

    lot
    > > of
    > > information saved on various cameras.
    > > I'll try scanning some photos next.
    > >
    > > Geopelia

    >
    > To copy a photograph.
    > Put it in the scanner
    > Select paper to photo - the semi gloss paper is cheap enough.
    > Select colour copy
    > From memory on the 1410.
    >
    > Handy if someone has a few pictures to show you, in a couple of minutes

    you
    > can have your own copies. No need to even turn on the PC, just the

    printer
    > when doing a direct copy.
    >
    > A few Kodak models look pretty good, but the reports of the cameras

    packing
    > up in some cases is a bit off putting.
    > Of course there's the chance that any camera could pack up, but more

    likely
    > some brands have better quality control than others. Non camera brand

    that
    > compares well seems to be Panasonic.
    >
    > When scanning a photo select a resolution of 600 or even 1200 if the MBs
    > won't be too high. It will give a very large picture on the computer but
    > the more detail the better. After that you can resample the picture down

    to
    > better viewing size. A low resolution scan won't get the best results.
    > First thing though is the quick pre-scan it then shows a broken scan

    border
    > round a little picture. If the border shows what you want in the picture
    > without moving the sides of the border to suit, then you can do the main
    > high resolution scan.
    >
    > You'll have fun.
    > The real hard work is when having to restore badly damaged old black and
    > white photos. The results are worth it when one sees the improvements.
    > Some old photos are usually bright and badly faded. PSP soon restores

    them.
    >
    > You should get good value and fun out of your printer.
    >
    > E. Scrooge
    >

    Thank you. It sounds very much like my old Acer scanner, to use. With that
    one though I had to scan, move it to My Documents, and then print it out.

    I've just scanned a photo and sent it to a friend. It looks quite simple
    once I get used to pushing the buttons etc, but took ages for a first try,
    it was on Yahoo, which always takes ages, OE is much quicker.

    With these messages going to the whole group, there must be many people
    benefiting from your wise advice.

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Feb 3, 2006
    #18
  19. geopelia

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    news:2%yEf.125898$...
    >
    > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    > news:1138880174.684648@ftpsrv1...
    >>
    >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> news:H5lEf.119326$...
    >> >
    >> > "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    >> > news:1138841860.61910@ftpsrv1...
    >> >>
    >> >> "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    >> >>
    >> > Thank you. I suppose people buy Kodak because it is cheap. I've got a

    > lot
    >> > of
    >> > information saved on various cameras.
    >> > I'll try scanning some photos next.
    >> >
    >> > Geopelia

    >>
    >> To copy a photograph.
    >> Put it in the scanner
    >> Select paper to photo - the semi gloss paper is cheap enough.
    >> Select colour copy
    >> From memory on the 1410.
    >>
    >> Handy if someone has a few pictures to show you, in a couple of minutes

    > you
    >> can have your own copies. No need to even turn on the PC, just the

    > printer
    >> when doing a direct copy.
    >>
    >> A few Kodak models look pretty good, but the reports of the cameras

    > packing
    >> up in some cases is a bit off putting.
    >> Of course there's the chance that any camera could pack up, but more

    > likely
    >> some brands have better quality control than others. Non camera brand

    > that
    >> compares well seems to be Panasonic.
    >>
    >> When scanning a photo select a resolution of 600 or even 1200 if the MBs
    >> won't be too high. It will give a very large picture on the computer but
    >> the more detail the better. After that you can resample the picture down

    > to
    >> better viewing size. A low resolution scan won't get the best results.
    >> First thing though is the quick pre-scan it then shows a broken scan

    > border
    >> round a little picture. If the border shows what you want in the picture
    >> without moving the sides of the border to suit, then you can do the main
    >> high resolution scan.
    >>
    >> You'll have fun.
    >> The real hard work is when having to restore badly damaged old black and
    >> white photos. The results are worth it when one sees the improvements.
    >> Some old photos are usually bright and badly faded. PSP soon restores

    > them.
    >>
    >> You should get good value and fun out of your printer.
    >>
    >> E. Scrooge
    >>

    > Thank you. It sounds very much like my old Acer scanner, to use. With that
    > one though I had to scan, move it to My Documents, and then print it out.
    >
    > I've just scanned a photo and sent it to a friend. It looks quite simple
    > once I get used to pushing the buttons etc, but took ages for a first try,
    > it was on Yahoo, which always takes ages, OE is much quicker.
    >
    > With these messages going to the whole group, there must be many people
    > benefiting from your wise advice.
    >
    > Geopelia


    I don't know about that, some around here would have their own ideas and
    experiences.

    A good free image program is Irfan View if you haven't got it already.
    It will work with your scanner and printer. It has some good basic picture
    editing features.

    When sending a jpg photo you can give it more compression while saving it
    under a different name so that you can send it as a small jpg file in an
    email to someone. Between 100KB and 200KB are small enough files for
    pictures to email.
    You don't want to send a 2MB picture by email on dial up to someone else on
    dial up - could take a good 10 minutes or so.
    Keep good high quality edited versions of pictures for yourself for
    printing. Heavy compressed email versions won't print out looking as good
    as high quality pictures will.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Feb 3, 2006
    #19
  20. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
    news:1138955887.977107@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "geopelia" <> wrote in message
    > news:2%yEf.125898$...
    > >
    > > Thank you. It sounds very much like my old Acer scanner, to use. With

    that
    > > one though I had to scan, move it to My Documents, and then print it

    out.
    > >
    > > I've just scanned a photo and sent it to a friend. It looks quite simple
    > > once I get used to pushing the buttons etc, but took ages for a first

    try,
    > > it was on Yahoo, which always takes ages, OE is much quicker.
    > >
    > > With these messages going to the whole group, there must be many people
    > > benefiting from your wise advice.
    > >
    > > Geopelia

    >
    > I don't know about that, some around here would have their own ideas and
    > experiences.
    >
    > A good free image program is Irfan View if you haven't got it already.
    > It will work with your scanner and printer. It has some good basic

    picture
    > editing features.
    >
    > When sending a jpg photo you can give it more compression while saving it
    > under a different name so that you can send it as a small jpg file in an
    > email to someone. Between 100KB and 200KB are small enough files for
    > pictures to email.
    > You don't want to send a 2MB picture by email on dial up to someone else

    on
    > dial up - could take a good 10 minutes or so.
    > Keep good high quality edited versions of pictures for yourself for
    > printing. Heavy compressed email versions won't print out looking as good
    > as high quality pictures will.
    >
    > E. Scrooge
    >

    I make the pictures smaller for emailing with the marks at the sides of the
    picture. People send me pictures that are huge and take ages to arrive.
    I won't be printing many pictures, the glossy paper and coloured ink is so
    expensive.

    Geopelia
    geopelia, Feb 3, 2006
    #20
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