Hoya warm polarizer filter

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Alan D, Jul 12, 2004.

  1. Alan D

    Alan D Guest

    I am looking to get a polarzing filter for my Canon Rebel. Hoya has several
    available including one that combines an 81A filter with the polarizer. Any
    thoughts on using the warm version rather than just a polarzing filter for
    outdoor shots in bright sunlight?

    Thanks,
    Alan D.
     
    Alan D, Jul 12, 2004
    #1
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  2. "Alan D" <> wrote in
    news:hwAIc.154$:

    > I am looking to get a polarzing filter for my Canon Rebel. Hoya has
    > several available including one that combines an 81A filter with the
    > polarizer. Any thoughts on using the warm version rather than just a
    > polarzing filter for outdoor shots in bright sunlight?


    I would guess it does not matter. Color correction
    filters are not all that effective when you have
    white balance correction in your camera.


    /Roland
     
    Roland Karlsson, Jul 12, 2004
    #2
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  3. Alan D

    Mark M Guest

    "Alan D" <> wrote in message
    news:hwAIc.154$...
    > I am looking to get a polarzing filter for my Canon Rebel. Hoya has

    several
    > available including one that combines an 81A filter with the polarizer.

    Any
    > thoughts on using the warm version rather than just a polarzing filter for
    > outdoor shots in bright sunlight?


    Are you talking about a film camera (Rebel)?
    If it's digital, you will still benefit from a polarizing filter because of
    it's ability to darken skies and to accentuate or repress reflection on
    glass or water.
    For warming, though, you should simply use the appropriate white balance.

    BTW--

    Polarizers and warming filters are NOT even remotely similar in purpose or
    function.
    Polarizers limit light transmission based upon the angle the light is
    hitting the filter (it rotates, so that you can adjust this for
    strongest/desired effect).

    Warming filters are simply to compensate for overly cool light in
    scenes--like a cloudy day, or in shade.
     
    Mark M, Jul 14, 2004
    #3
  4. Alan D

    Paul H. Guest

    "Mark M" <> wrote in message
    news:BO%Ic.3559$9I.2902@okepread02...
    >
    > "Alan D" <> wrote in message
    > news:hwAIc.154$...
    > > I am looking to get a polarzing filter for my Canon Rebel. Hoya has

    > several
    > > available including one that combines an 81A filter with the polarizer.

    > Any
    > > thoughts on using the warm version rather than just a polarzing filter

    for
    > > outdoor shots in bright sunlight?

    >
    > Are you talking about a film camera (Rebel)?
    > If it's digital, you will still benefit from a polarizing filter because

    of
    > it's ability to darken skies and to accentuate or repress reflection on
    > glass or water.
    > For warming, though, you should simply use the appropriate white balance.


    Hmm.... The physical filter will actually keep certain wavelengths from
    entering the camera, allowing bluish haze-attenuation to occur, thus making
    distant landscapes less obscure; changing the white balance after the shot
    won't achieve the same effect.
     
    Paul H., Jul 14, 2004
    #4
  5. Alan D

    Alan D Guest

    It is a digital rebel.

    Alan D.


    "Mark M" <> wrote in message
    news:BO%Ic.3559$9I.2902@okepread02...
    >
    > "Alan D" <> wrote in message
    > news:hwAIc.154$...
    > > I am looking to get a polarzing filter for my Canon Rebel. Hoya has

    > several
    > > available including one that combines an 81A filter with the polarizer.

    > Any
    > > thoughts on using the warm version rather than just a polarzing filter

    for
    > > outdoor shots in bright sunlight?

    >
    > Are you talking about a film camera (Rebel)?
    > If it's digital, you will still benefit from a polarizing filter because

    of
    > it's ability to darken skies and to accentuate or repress reflection on
    > glass or water.
    > For warming, though, you should simply use the appropriate white balance.
    >
    > BTW--
    >
    > Polarizers and warming filters are NOT even remotely similar in purpose or
    > function.
    > Polarizers limit light transmission based upon the angle the light is
    > hitting the filter (it rotates, so that you can adjust this for
    > strongest/desired effect).
    >
    > Warming filters are simply to compensate for overly cool light in
    > scenes--like a cloudy day, or in shade.
    >
    >
     
    Alan D, Jul 14, 2004
    #5
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