How was this photo created?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by brett, May 23, 2006.

  1. brett

    brett Guest

    How are photos such as this one created?
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/

    The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely
    crisp and has different light. It looks as though the foreground
    subject was almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is
    there more to it?

    If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these
    types of photos on the apartment walls.

    Thanks,
    Brett
     
    brett, May 23, 2006
    #1
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  2. brett

    BD Guest

    Yep, that's just the natural result of using a rather wide aperture. If
    that shot was taken at a fairly low f-stop, then this effect will
    result.

    As to lighting, it is very overcast, but I'd say some minor adjustment
    to the color balance has been made. There does not seem to be much blue
    in the image; the sky is almost completely grey.

    Notice also that the outermost area of the image is slightly darker.
    This is called 'vignetting', and is an adjustment that can be done in
    various software packages.
     
    BD, May 23, 2006
    #2
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  3. brett wrote:
    > How are photos such as this one created?
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/
    >
    > The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely
    > crisp and has different light. It looks as though the foreground
    > subject was almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is
    > there more to it?
    >
    > If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these
    > types of photos on the apartment walls.


    I've done something similar in the Gimp by selecting the subject,
    inverting the selection and using a Gaussian blur on the background. You
    can see the original here:
    <http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrywallis/125316278/> and the edited
    version here: <http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrywallis/151711780/>.

    --
    - Barry
     
    Barry L. Wallis, May 23, 2006
    #3
  4. brett

    brett Guest

    Thanks. That's pretty neat editing. I can see the wings have a type
    of glow around them, which the clear foreground subjects seem to always
    adopt.

    Thanks on the tips. I'll be trying it.

    Brett
     
    brett, May 23, 2006
    #4
  5. brett

    brett Guest

    brett, May 23, 2006
    #5
  6. brett

    Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Mon, 22 May 2006 21:45:51 -0700, brett wrote:

    > How are photos such as this one created?
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/
    >
    > The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely crisp
    > and has different light. It looks as though the foreground subject was
    > almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is there more to it?
    >
    > If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these types
    > of photos on the apartment walls.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Brett

    Differential focusing. Use a large aperture and focus on the subject.
    --
    Neil
    Delete 'l' to reply
     
    Neil Ellwood, May 23, 2006
    #6
  7. brett

    Mark² Guest

    brett wrote:
    > How are photos such as this one created?
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/
    >
    > The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely
    > crisp and has different light. It looks as though the foreground
    > subject was almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is
    > there more to it?
    >
    > If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these
    > types of photos on the apartment walls.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Brett


    -Shallow depth of field via large aperture.
    -Either a lens that vignettes heavily...or a software darkening of the
    edges.

    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson
     
    Mark², May 23, 2006
    #7
  8. brett

    Ron Hunter Guest

    brett wrote:
    > Would this be the same kind of thing or is that just f-stop:
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/gazowana/3653794/
    >
    > Brett
    >

    My guess is that the large white wall portion on the right affected the
    focus, and the exposure was shot a bit underexposed because of that
    resulting in a poor depth of field. Just not a good picture with a
    rather diffuse foreground subject matter. Lots of other ways to get the
    same effect...
     
    Ron Hunter, May 23, 2006
    #8
  9. brett wrote:
    > Would this be the same kind of thing or is that just f-stop:
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/gazowana/3653794/


    It looks like depth of field to me (i.e., f-stop). I don't use Photoshop
    but it has the ability to do what you want by simulating depth of field
    from a particular point.

    --
    - Barry as TDC Sorcerer
    - Magical Manager of the Mysteriously Missing Main Street Magic Shop
    - "Got a fever, got the flu, come on in and we'll cure you."
    - Dr. Benjamin Silverstein, Main Street, Disneyland
    - DLR Pictures: http://members.cox.net/dl.album
     
    Barry L. Wallis, May 23, 2006
    #9
  10. brett

    2 Guest

    2, May 23, 2006
    #10
  11. brett

    2 Guest

    "Barry L. Wallis" <> wrote in message
    news:vUwcg.87454$TK1.39241@fed1read06...

    > I've done something similar in the Gimp by selecting the subject,
    > inverting the selection and using a Gaussian blur on the background. You
    > can see the original here:
    > <http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrywallis/125316278/> and the edited
    > version here: <http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrywallis/151711780/>.


    "Something similar" is really not close, Barry. Out-of-focus (OOF) is not
    the same as Gaussian blur.
     
    2, May 23, 2006
    #11
  12. brett

    2 Guest

    2, May 23, 2006
    #12
  13. brett

    l e o Guest

    Barry L. Wallis wrote:
    > brett wrote:
    >> How are photos such as this one created?
    >> http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/
    >>
    >> The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely
    >> crisp and has different light. It looks as though the foreground
    >> subject was almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is
    >> there more to it?
    >>
    >> If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these
    >> types of photos on the apartment walls.

    >
    > I've done something similar in the Gimp by selecting the subject,
    > inverting the selection and using a Gaussian blur on the background. You
    > can see the original here:
    > <http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrywallis/125316278/> and the edited
    > version here: <http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrywallis/151711780/>.



    See the problem of editing? The edges of the wings are blurred.
     
    l e o, May 23, 2006
    #13
  14. brett

    Mark Guest

    Despite the other posts about large appeture lenses, this image was
    photoshopped.

    It is done fairley well though, as it looks OK


    "brett" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > How are photos such as this one created?
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/
    >
    > The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely
    > crisp and has different light. It looks as though the foreground
    > subject was almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is
    > there more to it?
    >
    > If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these
    > types of photos on the apartment walls.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Brett
    >
     
    Mark, May 23, 2006
    #14
  15. brett

    J. Clarke Guest

    brett wrote:

    > Would this be the same kind of thing or is that just f-stop:
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/gazowana/3653794/


    No, that's just out of focus. Here are a couple that demonstrate the effect
    using a somewhat different subject:

    <http://www.flickr.com/photos/39383723@N00/149198891/>
    <http://www.flickr.com/photos/39383723@N00/149198892/>

    Any lens is only able to maintain sharp focus at a single distance. Moving
    the lens closer to the sensor moves that distance closer, moving it away
    makes it farther away. Any object that is not at that _exact_ distance
    will be out of focus. How far out of focus will depend on the focal length
    of the lens, the aperture, how far from the sensor the lens is located, and
    how far away from the plane or curve of perfect focus the object is
    located.

    For any combination of lens design, focal length, aperture, and distance
    from the sensor, there will be a certain range of distances from the point
    of perfect focus in which an object will be sharp enough appear to be "in
    focus" for practical purposes, this is called the "depth of field".

    Generally speaking, for a subject a given distance from the camera, a longer
    focal length lens will give a shallower depth of field, and a wider
    aperture will give a shallower depth of field.

    In the photo you linked, the girl is within the depth of field of the lens
    and the background is not.

    You might not be able to replicate that photo with a "point and shoot" type
    camera--they generally have very short focal length lenses with extreme
    amounts of depth of field. An exception might be one of the "superzoom"
    types used at wide aperture and full zoom--I used one such to do the two
    maple seed photos but I was very close to the subject.

    > Brett


    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, May 23, 2006
    #15
  16. "Mark" <> writes:

    > "brett" <> wrote...
    >> How are photos such as this one created?
    >> http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/
    >>
    >> The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely
    >> crisp and has different light. It looks as though the foreground
    >> subject was almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is
    >> there more to it?
    >>
    >> If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these
    >> types of photos on the apartment walls.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Brett
    >>

    >
    > Despite the other posts about large appeture lenses, this image was
    > photoshopped.
    >
    > It is done fairley well though, as it looks OK


    To me it looks like something has been done to the colors, aside from
    anything to do with the focus.

    --
    Måns Rullgård
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?M=E5ns_Rullg=E5rd?=, May 23, 2006
    #16
  17. brett

    l e o Guest

    Måns Rullgård wrote:
    > "Mark" <> writes:
    >
    >> "brett" <> wrote...
    >>> How are photos such as this one created?
    >>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/
    >>>
    >>> The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely
    >>> crisp and has different light. It looks as though the foreground
    >>> subject was almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is
    >>> there more to it?
    >>>
    >>> If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these
    >>> types of photos on the apartment walls.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> Brett
    >>>

    >> Despite the other posts about large appeture lenses, this image was
    >> photoshopped.
    >>
    >> It is done fairley well though, as it looks OK

    >
    > To me it looks like something has been done to the colors, aside from
    > anything to do with the focus.



    Look like fill flash to me; look at her nose. It can be done with a P&S.
    Just use long tele range and also note the size of the boy. He's far
    from the girl. Yes, that's all you need to do, make sure the background
    is far away from the subject!
     
    l e o, May 23, 2006
    #17
  18. l e o <> writes:

    > Måns Rullgård wrote:
    >> "Mark" <> writes:
    >>
    >>> "brett" <> wrote...
    >>>> How are photos such as this one created?
    >>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/
    >>>>
    >>>> The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely
    >>>> crisp and has different light. It looks as though the foreground
    >>>> subject was almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is
    >>>> there more to it?
    >>>>
    >>>> If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these
    >>>> types of photos on the apartment walls.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>> Brett
    >>>>
    >>> Despite the other posts about large appeture lenses, this image was
    >>> photoshopped.
    >>>
    >>> It is done fairley well though, as it looks OK

    >> To me it looks like something has been done to the colors, aside from
    >> anything to do with the focus.

    >
    > Look like fill flash to me; look at her nose. It can be done with a
    > P&S. Just use long tele range and also note the size of the boy. He's
    > far from the girl. Yes, that's all you need to do, make sure the
    > background is far away from the subject!


    I was talking about the brownish color cast.

    --
    Måns Rullgård
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?M=E5ns_Rullg=E5rd?=, May 23, 2006
    #18
  19. brett

    Guest

    brett wrote:
    > How are photos such as this one created?
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremycowart/29402198/
    >
    > The background is a kind of blur while the foreground is extremely
    > crisp and has different light. It looks as though the foreground
    > subject was almost pasted into the photo. Is that just f-stop or is
    > there more to it?


    Could be photoshop (if you look at the photographer's other
    pictures on flickr, there is a lot of photoshop alteration of the
    light) and probably also use of fill flash to help create the "pop."
    Other people covered the depth of field issue.

    > If any one has seen the movie 'High Art', there were a few of these
    > types of photos on the apartment walls.


    FWIW, the Sheedy character in "High Art" is loosely based
    on the photographer Nan Goldin, although I can't recall if
    any of the photos themselves were styled on her work.
     
    , May 23, 2006
    #19
  20. brett

    2 Guest

    "Mark" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Despite the other posts about large appeture lenses, this image was
    > photoshopped.


    Show me.
     
    2, May 24, 2006
    #20
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