How to use knowledge of hyperfocal distance...?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by kasterborus@yahoo.com, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. Guest

    I've been reading more about hyperfocal distance and its importance
    when taking landscapes that require as much in focus as possible.

    However how do you actually apply it in the field? (pun intended)

    I have read that you "focus on infinity, then locate the leading edge
    of whatever is in focus, and focus on that". I'm not sure that my eyes
    would be good enough to see where the leading edge of anything was in a
    wide scene.

    Next to taking one of those laser guided "tape" measures on a shoot how
    can I practically apply knowledge of a hyperfocal distance?

    Thanks,
    Steve
     
    , Oct 26, 2005
    #1
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  2. Nikon User Guest

    In article <>,
    wrote:

    > I've been reading more about hyperfocal distance and its importance
    > when taking landscapes that require as much in focus as possible.
    >
    > However how do you actually apply it in the field? (pun intended)
    >
    > I have read that you "focus on infinity, then locate the leading edge
    > of whatever is in focus, and focus on that". I'm not sure that my
    > eyes would be good enough to see where the leading edge of anything
    > was in a wide scene.


    The way I've always done it is to first determine the f/stop I'll be
    using, and then set the infinity marker on the focus ring to that
    f/stop. That will set the focus to the hyperfocal distance.
     
    Nikon User, Oct 26, 2005
    #2
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  3. Roy Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've been reading more about hyperfocal distance and its importance
    > when taking landscapes that require as much in focus as possible.
    >
    > However how do you actually apply it in the field? (pun intended)
    >
    > I have read that you "focus on infinity, then locate the leading edge
    > of whatever is in focus, and focus on that". I'm not sure that my eyes
    > would be good enough to see where the leading edge of anything was in a
    > wide scene.
    >
    > Next to taking one of those laser guided "tape" measures on a shoot how
    > can I practically apply knowledge of a hyperfocal distance?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Steve
    >

    Hi there.

    That is what I always did using my film Cameras and AI lenses, but neither
    of my Auto Focus Nikors have DoF scales on the Lens, to which you can set
    the Infinity mark.

    So it just becomes a matter of Auto Focussing on a middle distance object
    and hoping for the best, sort of.

    Roy G
     
    Roy, Oct 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Bob Guest

    On 26 Oct 2005 07:33:07 -0700, wrote:

    >I've been reading more about hyperfocal distance and its importance
    >when taking landscapes that require as much in focus as possible.
    >
    >However how do you actually apply it in the field? (pun intended)
    >
    >I have read that you "focus on infinity, then locate the leading edge
    >of whatever is in focus, and focus on that". I'm not sure that my eyes
    >would be good enough to see where the leading edge of anything was in a
    >wide scene.
    >
    >Next to taking one of those laser guided "tape" measures on a shoot how
    >can I practically apply knowledge of a hyperfocal distance?
    >
    >Thanks,
    >Steve



    There are programs available that let you make a chart for your lens, and you
    just follow that.

    http://dfleming.ameranet.com/
     
    Bob, Oct 27, 2005
    #4
  5. Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Wed, 26 Oct 2005 23:15:31 +0000, Roy wrote:

    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I've been reading more about hyperfocal distance and its importance
    >> when taking landscapes that require as much in focus as possible.
    >>
    >> However how do you actually apply it in the field? (pun intended)
    >>
    >> I have read that you "focus on infinity, then locate the leading edge
    >> of whatever is in focus, and focus on that". I'm not sure that my eyes
    >> would be good enough to see where the leading edge of anything was in a
    >> wide scene.
    >>
    >> Next to taking one of those laser guided "tape" measures on a shoot how
    >> can I practically apply knowledge of a hyperfocal distance?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Steve
    >>

    > Hi there.
    >
    > That is what I always did using my film Cameras and AI lenses, but neither
    > of my Auto Focus Nikors have DoF scales on the Lens, to which you can set
    > the Infinity mark.
    >
    > So it just becomes a matter of Auto Focussing on a middle distance object
    > and hoping for the best, sort of.
    >
    > Roy G

    Have you tried the dof button and looking at the image through the
    view finder?

    --
    Neil
    Delete delete to reply by email
     
    Neil Ellwood, Oct 27, 2005
    #5
  6. Lorem Ipsum Guest

    "Nikon User" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I've been reading more about hyperfocal distance and its importance
    >> when taking landscapes that require as much in focus as possible.
    >>
    >> However how do you actually apply it in the field? (pun intended)
    >>
    >> I have read that you "focus on infinity, then locate the leading edge
    >> of whatever is in focus, and focus on that". I'm not sure that my
    >> eyes would be good enough to see where the leading edge of anything
    >> was in a wide scene.

    >
    > The way I've always done it is to first determine the f/stop I'll be
    > using, and then set the infinity marker on the focus ring to that
    > f/stop. That will set the focus to the hyperfocal distance.
     
    Lorem Ipsum, Oct 27, 2005
    #6
  7. Lorem Ipsum Guest

    In article <>,
    > wrote:
    >
    >I've been reading more about hyperfocal distance and its importance
    >when taking landscapes that require as much in focus as possible.
    >
    >However how do you actually apply it in the field? (pun intended)


    You will get some good answers here. Permit me to add: keep in mind that
    hyperfocal figures (the range given for a specific F-Stop) depends upon what
    is called the acceptable Circle of Confusion (CoC). Think of it as the
    'blurr tolerance'. The larger your print, the more strident or critical one
    has to be for the figures given. Large prints from a small sensor can look
    horrible when the hyperfocal figure (range) given presumes a large CoC, in
    other words, a CoC for small print.

    Even the top film-camera makers, for example Hasselblad, says not to use the
    hyperfocal scales on their lenses when the work is to be printed very large;
    but to use a more conservative range instead.
     
    Lorem Ipsum, Oct 27, 2005
    #7
  8. Lorem Ipsum Guest

    "Roy" <> wrote in message
    news:n6U7f.10176$...

    > That is what I always did using my film Cameras and AI lenses, but neither
    > of my Auto Focus Nikors have DoF scales on the Lens, to which you can set
    > the Infinity mark.
    >
    > So it just becomes a matter of Auto Focussing on a middle distance object
    > and hoping for the best, sort of.


    That's a fair rule-of-thumb. More accurately, the acceptable depth-of-focus
    is more like 1/3 in front of the focused image, and 2/3 to the rear.
     
    Lorem Ipsum, Oct 27, 2005
    #8
  9. John Bean Guest

    On Thu, 27 Oct 2005 11:07:45 -0500, "Lorem Ipsum"
    <> wrote:

    >"Roy" <> wrote in message
    >news:n6U7f.10176$...
    >
    >> That is what I always did using my film Cameras and AI lenses, but neither
    >> of my Auto Focus Nikors have DoF scales on the Lens, to which you can set
    >> the Infinity mark.
    >>
    >> So it just becomes a matter of Auto Focussing on a middle distance object
    >> and hoping for the best, sort of.

    >
    >That's a fair rule-of-thumb. More accurately, the acceptable depth-of-focus
    >is more like 1/3 in front of the focused image, and 2/3 to the rear.
    >

    That's ok except for hyperfocal focusing (which is what the
    OP asked about) - it's a bit hard to estimate what
    constitutes a third of infinity...

    --
    John Bean
     
    John Bean, Oct 27, 2005
    #9
  10. John Bean wrote:
    []
    > That's ok except for hyperfocal focusing (which is what the
    > OP asked about) - it's a bit hard to estimate what
    > constitutes a third of infinity...


    Not when expressed as 1 / distance, it isn't!

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Oct 28, 2005
    #10
  11. On Thu, 27 Oct 2005 21:11:52 +0100, John Bean <> wrote:
    > That's ok except for hyperfocal focusing (which is what the
    > OP asked about) - it's a bit hard to estimate what
    > constitutes a third of infinity...


    It's easy, actually. 1/3 of infinity is infinity...

    -dms
     
    Daniel Silevitch, Oct 28, 2005
    #11
  12. John Bean Guest

    On Fri, 28 Oct 2005 13:16:16 GMT, Daniel Silevitch
    <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 27 Oct 2005 21:11:52 +0100, John Bean <> wrote:
    >> That's ok except for hyperfocal focusing (which is what the
    >> OP asked about) - it's a bit hard to estimate what
    >> constitutes a third of infinity...

    >
    >It's easy, actually. 1/3 of infinity is infinity...


    Precisely. That's why the "1/3 in front, 2/3 behind"
    rule-of-thumb is less than helpful for hyperfocal
    guesstimates.

    --
    John Bean
     
    John Bean, Oct 28, 2005
    #12
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